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Topic: who has tried "perfect pitch supercourse"  (Read 4364 times)

Offline DK2

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who has tried "perfect pitch supercourse"
on: June 12, 2005, 06:11:46 PM
Hey !!
have some of you tried "perfect pitch supercourse" (www.perfectpitch.com) ??
        . ..  does it work?    is it the price worth???

is there some here who has perfect (absolute) pitch?  how is it?

Offline Toivot

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Re: who has tried "perfect pitch supercourse"
Reply #1 on: June 12, 2005, 06:13:41 PM
Does a musician need perfect pitch?
If yes, why?
The piano has you.

Offline jkristiand

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Re: who has tried "perfect pitch supercourse"
Reply #2 on: June 12, 2005, 06:58:35 PM
I have the supercourse and I have used it, then quit, now slowly starting to practise it again and will do so throughout the summer. Right now I can faintly
tell differences between pitch colours, but it depends of the octave... Try it, I have read plenty of posts by people who have benefitted from it. By the way try searching these forums..

Offline LVB op.57

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Re: who has tried "perfect pitch supercourse"
Reply #3 on: June 12, 2005, 11:29:37 PM
Does a musician need perfect pitch?
If yes, why?

Not by any means. Many people are led to believe this by the fact that most well known composers had it. In my opinion it's very helpful in composition, but not necesarry for a performer. Performers should, however develop a good sense of relative pitch. This will allow you to tell when you're hitting wrong notes, and you'll be able to sight sing.

Offline gorbee natcase

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Re: who has tried "perfect pitch supercourse"
Reply #4 on: June 12, 2005, 11:48:09 PM
Listen to music
(\_/)
(O.o)
(> <)      What ever Bernhard said

Offline Daevren

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Re: who has tried "perfect pitch supercourse"
Reply #5 on: June 13, 2005, 12:05:06 AM
Waste of money. It contains some guy talking endlessly about obvious or relatively minor things. There is no magic in it and the excersizes are nothing special.

Plus its doubtful that spending all that time learning PP is worth if. Especially for a classical pianist.

Offline nanabush

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Re: who has tried "perfect pitch supercourse"
Reply #6 on: June 13, 2005, 01:56:34 AM
I got perfect pitch :P we had a test in my school lol...It's only good I find on exams when the examiner plays a melody and you play it back... I just say the notes in my head, it helps a bit too with memorization, but I don't like rely on it, I don't think you need it at all.
Interested in discussing:

-Prokofiev Toccata
-Scriabin Sonata 2

Offline quantum

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Re: who has tried "perfect pitch supercourse"
Reply #7 on: June 13, 2005, 04:07:00 AM
I have a friend who quite regulary uses her perfect pitch.  Unfortunately it is confusing for her to accompany transposing instruments (Clarinet, Trumpet, Fr. Horn, etc.) because the note she sees on the score is not the note she hears.  An example of a disadvantage of perfect pitch, or at least the inablillity to control it. 
Made a Liszt. Need new Handel's for Soler panel & Alkan foil. Will Faure Stein on the way to pick up Mendels' sohn. Josquin get Wolfgangs Schu with Clara. Gone Chopin, I'll be Bach

Offline pseudopianist

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Re: who has tried "perfect pitch supercourse"
Reply #8 on: June 13, 2005, 10:26:52 AM
I have the supercourse and I have used it, then quit, now slowly starting to practise it again and will do so throughout the summer. Right now I can faintly
tell differences between pitch colours, but it depends of the octave... Try it, I have read plenty of posts by people who have benefitted from it. By the way try searching these forums..

Same here


What I didn't like was the some major jumps of difficulty in the excises. The first 3 was like "Listen to a note" and the other 6 was "Paint some something... something nice" then all of the sudden NAME 20 NOTES IN A ROW BEFORE MOVING ON THE NEXT DRILL.

I never did ._.
Whisky and Messiaen

Offline cadenz

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Re: who has tried "perfect pitch supercourse"
Reply #9 on: June 13, 2005, 10:29:05 AM
you could try www.prolobe.com you don't have to pay for this, but i don't know if its any good compared to other things

Offline Doodle

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Re: who has tried "perfect pitch supercourse"
Reply #10 on: June 17, 2005, 04:07:08 PM
For me .."Life is a Pitch."

Perfect pitch seems like a nice thing to others.  I am just happy the age of analog tapes is at an end.   Most tape players either sped things up, or slowed them down.   This would sometimes affect pitch by as much as a half step.  Have you ever tried singing in a church choir along with a taped accompaniment where you are having to mentally adjust all your pitches by a "flarp."  It made my head spin. 

The vacuum cleaner is an E flat.  The florescent light is close to B flat.  I was matching pitches to anything from as early as I can remember.  The Doppler affect as it relates to an ice cream truck.... makes me dizzy. 

A good relative pitch is perfectly O.K. for piano.   Good piano pitch is perfectly not OK for violin.   My violin teacher would chastise me for "well-tempering" my violin playing. 

I'm not in the camp that believes that someone can learn how to distinguish pitch by lstening to sound waves.   You either have that kind of sensitivity, or you don't.   My dad could not carry a tune in a bucket.   Having 4 musicians trying to teach him, never helped. 

Doodle

Offline gezellig2005

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Re: who has tried "perfect pitch supercourse"
Reply #11 on: June 21, 2005, 01:36:51 PM
I have a friend who quite regulary uses her perfect pitch.  Unfortunately it is confusing for her to accompany transposing instruments (Clarinet, Trumpet, Fr. Horn, etc.) because the note she sees on the score is not the note she hears.  An example of a disadvantage of perfect pitch, or at least the inablillity to control it. 



i have the same problem. i play piano for the choir. It really confuses me when they practice singing the notes, because I play differently.....e.g.  i have to play C when they say/sing E, I play E and they sing G...so and so...

Offline benedikt

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Prolobe
Reply #12 on: June 28, 2005, 09:44:03 AM
I dont know any other place where i could ask this:
Does anybody know what happened to www.prolobe.com? I started practising a few weeks ago, hope its not gone ...
cheers bene

Offline jazz_man

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Re: who has tried "perfect pitch supercourse"
Reply #13 on: June 28, 2005, 04:52:09 PM

is there some here who has perfect (absolute) pitch?  how is it?

I think I might have absolute pitch.  I can usually tell what note some one is playing on a piano,  but I play different instuments in different pitches,  so sometimes it confuses me.  I'm not very good at telling yet,  for example I couldn't tell you the individual notes in a chord,  only if one note at a time is played.  I don't know how I do it,  it just happens sometimes.  I don't really think that you can learn it,  some people just have it.  Weird...  It sounds sore of like being phychic,  but I don't believe in that... :-\

To me, It isn't a big deal,  it just means I can find notes a little faster.
"Music is a moral law. It gives soul to the universe, wings to the mind, flight to the imagination, and charm and gaiety to life and to everything."
- Plato

Offline shoshin

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Re: who has tried "perfect pitch supercourse"
Reply #14 on: June 29, 2005, 09:36:00 PM
um I'm not buying this "perfect pitch" stuff. So today instruments are tuned at 440Hz. That means if you brought Mozart, Bach, Beethoven to a modern day piano they wouldn't  have perfect pitch.  Tuning  your ears to 440Hz is the dumbest idea I've ever heard.

For example, if someone claims to have "perfect pitch" and  I tuned a piano to 410 Hz they wouldn't be able to know any notes because the definition of their perfect pitch relies on a 440Hz instrument.

Do you know that 440Hz is COMPLETELY an arbitrary number?

Offline ralessi

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Re: who has tried "perfect pitch supercourse"
Reply #15 on: June 29, 2005, 11:25:24 PM
um I'm not buying this "perfect pitch" stuff. So today instruments are tuned at 440Hz. That means if you brought Mozart, Bach, Beethoven to a modern day piano they wouldn't have perfect pitch. Tuning your ears to 440Hz is the dumbest idea I've ever heard.

For example, if someone claims to have "perfect pitch" and I tuned a piano to 410 Hz they wouldn't be able to know any notes because the definition of their perfect pitch relies on a 440Hz instrument.

Do you know that 440Hz is COMPLETELY an arbitrary number?

Not true....I have perfect pitch, and if you tuned a piano down i could still tell you what the notes were.  Just as if it were out of tune.  People with perfect pitch hear a pitch for the sound it makes and thats it....anyone with perfect pitch should be able to tell you exactly where that pitch is.....down to..."well that pitch is between an E and an F..."

Im not very good with words so i hope this made sense...and didnt sound like im talking out of my a$$!

Cheers!
Ricky

Offline c18cont

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Re: who has tried "perfect pitch supercourse"
Reply #16 on: June 29, 2005, 11:29:49 PM
Arbitrary perhaps shoshin,

But not to the ear, perhaps, of many.......at least for some...In fact the evidence available on the web did suggest that the tiny ciliated hair-like attachments to the cells determine pitch discrimination...as well as detect the sound coming in...They can TELL some people the actual pitch, once heard and identified...and many can learn at least limited relative pitch...

In other words, there are a large number of cells to cover all pitches we are sensitive to, and many people can "remember" the pitch very accurately from childhood on, after only a few hearings....Others require much longer, or even can never determine pitch....It is done as a result of the relation of the hair-cells to the sensory area in the brain that is sensitive to hearing....

They called  them hair cells in general,when I had a short course on the subject several years ago....(I have been working on a minor in acoustics...), and I remember in college bio. we studied them as hair cells for a short while many years ago... I haven't had any another course recently....

I don't know the latest from medical studies, but there is new info, as my friend in the business as a Dr. of the head wants to try to correct a prob I have had since a diving accident many years ago, as there is new technology and physical info, so he tells me.......

Perhaps myself or someone can look up the material and report back...Or perhaps someone already has the bio-physical facts at hand and can tell us more....(?)  (I will try, but don't promise anything).

John
 

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