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Topic: Pedalling in Beethoven's Les Adieux  (Read 2283 times)

Offline Jacey1973

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Pedalling in Beethoven's Les Adieux
on: August 06, 2005, 05:23:40 PM
Hiya,

I've just learnt this sonata (the notes at least) and i'm wondering for those who have played this/performed it, what do you think about pedalling?

I'm a bit out of touch with Beethoven haven't played any of his music for a couple of years and won't be having my 1st piano lesson till nearing the end of Sept, so i could do with a few ideas!

I'm thinking that the 1st mov't and 3rd dont need that much. But i'm finding it difficult to keep the notes really clear (because of their speed) whilst trying to pedal them a little - because i believe Beethoven needs more pedal than say Mozart with whom i am more familiar with.

Could anyone give a bit of advice - plus any other interpretative ideas you have on this sonata, i'm feeling a bit lost without my teacher's advice!
"Mozart makes you believe in God - it cannot be by chance that such a phenomenon arrives into this world and then passes after 36 yrs, leaving behind such an unbounded no. of unparalled masterpieces"

Offline mehmetbaj

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Re: Pedalling in Beethoven's Les Adieux
Reply #1 on: August 06, 2005, 09:24:41 PM
With Beethoven, 90% you should use the pedal to increase the amount of sound you get from the instrument. The other 10%, you can mess around with for effects. With passages with many notes that require a legato sound, try half-pedaling (depressing the pedal half-way, or even less, down).
All the movements could definately use the sound you achieve by pedaling. Do not let any movement go without pedaling or the structure will fall apart. The whole sonata is basically one giant movement of a sonata almost. Listen to some recordings to get an idea too. Preferrably Brendel, but Richter isn't bad either.

Hope this helps.

Offline Jacey1973

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Re: Pedalling in Beethoven's Les Adieux
Reply #2 on: August 06, 2005, 10:09:45 PM
With Beethoven, 90% you should use the pedal to increase the amount of sound you get from the instrument. The other 10%, you can mess around with for effects. With passages with many notes that require a legato sound, try half-pedaling (depressing the pedal half-way, or even less, down).
All the movements could definately use the sound you achieve by pedaling. Do not let any movement go without pedaling or the structure will fall apart. The whole sonata is basically one giant movement of a sonata almost. Listen to some recordings to get an idea too. Preferrably Brendel, but Richter isn't bad either.

Hope this helps.



Oh thanks! Yeah i've been experimenting with half pedalling will try and perfect it! I got an Alfred Brendal recording it is lovely to listen to... :)
"Mozart makes you believe in God - it cannot be by chance that such a phenomenon arrives into this world and then passes after 36 yrs, leaving behind such an unbounded no. of unparalled masterpieces"
 

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