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Topic: Begin competition with etude or lyrical?  (Read 1921 times)

Offline allchopin

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Begin competition with etude or lyrical?
on: August 17, 2003, 08:09:30 AM
At a competition, would one start with an etude first, and then go on with ballade, nocturne, etc.?

Here is a performace repertoir puzzle: please put them in order how you would perform them.
(all chopin pieces  :))

- Etude #9 Op. 10
- Etude #12 Op. 25
- Ballade #4
- Nocturne #1 Op. 9
- Fantasie-Impromptu
- Minute Waltz

What will the judges like?  8)
A modern house without a flush toilet... uncanny.

Offline tph

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Re: Begin competition with etude or lyrical?
Reply #1 on: August 23, 2003, 05:51:30 PM
I'm not sure what a judge's preference would be, but strictly out of a practical consideration of nerves and tension, I would start with the Nocturne before jumping into any etudes, and I would save the Ballade for last, as that will probably be your core piece.

Good luck!

tph

b.t.w. what competition is this for?

Offline Remon

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Re: Begin competition with etude or lyrical?
Reply #2 on: August 24, 2003, 05:13:36 PM
I think it's important for you to remember that you MUST NOT think all the time of playing for the jury, because this way it's harder to focus on what's real important: the music!
So, I would suggest that you play the pieces in such an order that YOU feel comfortable about it, because the more you feel comfortable, the better you play, the more the jury will be impressed by your playing!  :)

If I would play this pieces in a competition, I think I prefer the following order:
- Minute Waltz (It's not too difficult, and quite "light")
- Etudes (first Op 10 #9)
- Nocturne (After the technical difficult etudes, this more quiet piece is probably comfortable)
- Fantaisie Impromptu
- Ballade (I think this is the hardest piece concerning musicality)

Good luck!

Offline allchopin

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Re: Begin competition with etude or lyrical?
Reply #3 on: August 25, 2003, 01:58:33 AM
Thanks-
this is pretty close to what i was thinking of doing.
I dont know about the waltz first, however.  It is rather hard, and my fingers may not be warmed up enough yet to play that right away.  But other than that, ill go with whats good for me.  I just figured the judges would care what order they should go in.
A modern house without a flush toilet... uncanny.

Offline Remon

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Re: Begin competition with etude or lyrical?
Reply #4 on: August 25, 2003, 10:36:41 AM
Hey!
What do you mean by: "I just figured the judges would care what order they should go in." ?
Yeah maybe you should start with opus 10 # 9, it's not as fast as the minute-waltz.
But if you keep your fingers are at a good temperature, it should be possible to begin with any piece you like to.
Just be MENTALLY prepared for it!
Good luck, Remon

Offline allchopin

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Re: Begin competition with etude or lyrical?
Reply #5 on: August 26, 2003, 06:42:15 AM
I meant that i thought the judges would want the pieces in a certain order.
A modern house without a flush toilet... uncanny.

Offline Remon

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Re: Begin competition with etude or lyrical?
Reply #6 on: August 26, 2003, 09:04:40 PM
Allright, just don't think of the jury too much, YOU have to like the order in which you're going to play.
Anyway, I would start with something not too difficult and not too virtuosic, and I would save your best piece for the finale!
Remon

Offline david

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Re: Begin competition with etude or lyrical?
Reply #7 on: August 30, 2003, 07:07:04 PM
Hi, best luck with your competition.
I think you should play the two studies together, and it's a good idea to start with one of them.The balad should be last piece , and the rest as you feel comfortable. The waltz in the middle of two great pieces.
Good luck , again.
David
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