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Author Topic: Chopin etude op 10 nr 2  (Read 3048 times)
lisztener
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« on: November 17, 2005, 03:56:08 PM »

Hi !  I know that Chopin's etudes are very difficult. But is there any chance that I can start working on op 10 nr 2?  It sounds very difficult, but the notes seem easy (no big gaps etc.) The trickiest part is presumably the speed. I've played Chopins waltz in C sharp minor, his nocturnes op 9 nr 1 and 2, and Debussys Clair de lune. Do you think it's reasonably of me to attempt to learn this etude? (Even though it it very fast)
Take care! /lisztener
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piano sheet music of Etude
zheer
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« Reply #1 on: November 17, 2005, 04:08:55 PM »

O yeah i dont see why not, i remember the first time i heard the Chopin Etudes by Ashkenazy i though ha i can play the second one, but then i saw that its play with the 3rd 4th and 5th finger i had a heart attack.
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lisztener
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« Reply #2 on: November 17, 2005, 04:24:50 PM »

I don't get it. Do you think it's too difficult or not?  Were you ironic ?   Huh
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BoliverAllmon
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« Reply #3 on: November 17, 2005, 04:34:53 PM »

that etude is probably one of if not the hardest one. who cares about gaps. playing 16th note chromatic passages with 3,4,and 5 while playing chords with the other fingers is crazy. very very difficult. More than likely it is over your head.
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zheer
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« Reply #4 on: November 17, 2005, 04:45:00 PM »

I don't get it. Do you think it's too difficult or not?  Were you ironic ?   Huh
Sorry i was trying to be funny. Any way i dont think its the most difficult etude, however its a good place to start, since it will help you with the winter Etude + the etude in thirds and finally the octave etudes.
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BoliverAllmon
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« Reply #5 on: November 17, 2005, 05:43:19 PM »

I find the octave etude harder than no. 2.
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Ruro
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« Reply #6 on: November 17, 2005, 06:24:59 PM »

You gotta love it (or hate it!), how they seem so simple, but aren't! Angry

I tried No.3 thinking it was easy, well... maybe just the first 10 bars!! One of those things that definately takes too much time to make it not worth it. I recently keep looking at the Harmonies Du Soir score, looks feasable besides the arpeggio bits in the bass... but I will soon print the first page and realise how pointless it is trying.

Interesting to find out what exactly is difficult about it though.

And BoliverAllmon, I swear the Octave should be easy, but I can't even be bothered to waste time proving myself wrong Smiley
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mrchops10
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« Reply #7 on: November 17, 2005, 06:48:25 PM »

I would be concerned about a person at your level attempting this etude. Although not quite as dangerous as 10/1, it still has its perils and can wreak physical havoc. Why do you want to play this so much? Other etudes are quite frankly more musically interesting (please don't kill me for that), and would probably at this point add more to your technique than sitting for hours practicing 10/2 at half speed.
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"In the crystal of his harmony he gathered the tears of the Polish people strewn over the fields, and placed them as the diamond of beauty in the diadem of humanity." --The poet Norwid, on Chopin
BoliverAllmon
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« Reply #8 on: November 18, 2005, 01:52:15 AM »

You gotta love it (or hate it!), how they seem so simple, but aren't! Angry

I tried No.3 thinking it was easy, well... maybe just the first 10 bars!! One of those things that definately takes too much time to make it not worth it. I recently keep looking at the Harmonies Du Soir score, looks feasable besides the arpeggio bits in the bass... but I will soon print the first page and realise how pointless it is trying.

Interesting to find out what exactly is difficult about it though.

And BoliverAllmon, I swear the Octave should be easy, but I can't even be bothered to waste time proving myself wrong Smiley

don't even worry about trying to prove me. I wrote that backwards. I meant to say that the octave is easier than no. 2. I must of had a brain fart or something.

boliver
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rimv2
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« Reply #9 on: November 18, 2005, 04:51:14 PM »

I would be concerned about a person at your level attempting this etude. Although not quite as dangerous as 10/1, it still has its perils and can wreak physical havoc. Why do you want to play this so much? Other etudes are quite frankly more musically interesting (please don't kill me for that), and would probably at this point add more to your technique than sitting for hours practicing 10/2 at half speed.

Practicing this piece at half speed aint really gonna help much. You either practice it stupid slow in its entirety or stupid fast in one or two beat groups. Ah practiced a while back and was able to get the first line going at tempo within a few days of practice using the stupid fast method ah devised. But turning around this way is really the hard part.
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lisztener
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« Reply #10 on: November 18, 2005, 10:19:04 PM »

I would be concerned about a person at your level attempting this etude. Although not quite as dangerous as 10/1, it still has its perils and can wreak physical havoc. Why do you want to play this so much? Other etudes are quite frankly more musically interesting (please don't kill me for that), and would probably at this point add more to your technique than sitting for hours practicing 10/2 at half speed.

I'm not at  all familiar with his etudes except his 10 #3  of which I have played a bit..
But I like #2, it crawles in my spine a bit when I hear it Smiley 
I havn't considered the technical problems that follows enough :/

What are your recommendations about which etude to play first (to benefit the most purely technically) ?  Or am I - since we are talking of Chopins etudes - not skilled enough to begin wiht anyone of them?  (In that case, please give advice of other pieces that might fit - not nescessarily a Chopin piece)
Take care ! /lisztener
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BoliverAllmon
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« Reply #11 on: November 18, 2005, 10:26:19 PM »

I have always felt personally that no. 4 is an overall good technique builder. It works with both hands, not just one.
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lisztener
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« Reply #12 on: November 18, 2005, 10:41:57 PM »

Ok, maybe I'll try it Wink
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mrchops10
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« Reply #13 on: November 18, 2005, 11:37:54 PM »

my first etude was op. 25 no. 2, a very nice and more modest piece. Then I played op. 10 no. 5 ("Black Keys") which is considerably more difficult, but very beneficial technically. Op. 10/4 is a very good technique builder, true, but more difficult than either of these etudes.
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"In the crystal of his harmony he gathered the tears of the Polish people strewn over the fields, and placed them as the diamond of beauty in the diadem of humanity." --The poet Norwid, on Chopin
BoliverAllmon
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« Reply #14 on: November 19, 2005, 12:25:18 AM »

I will give you that point. I have never really worked on an etude before, therefore my assumptions are based on what the sheet music looks like.
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rimv2
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« Reply #15 on: November 19, 2005, 03:19:54 AM »

I'm not at  all familiar with his etudes except his 10 #3  of which I have played a bit..
But I like #2, it crawles in my spine a bit when I hear it Smiley 
I havn't considered the technical problems that follows enough :/

What are your recommendations about which etude to play first (to benefit the most purely technically) ?  Or am I - since we are talking of Chopins etudes - not skilled enough to begin wiht anyone of them?  (In that case, please give advice of other pieces that might fit - not nescessarily a Chopin piece)
Take care ! /lisztener

Unfortunately, ahve only played 10-1 and 10-12.  Ah is a very quick learner, and fully capable of understanding  why ah can or cant do certain things at the piano, and adjusting myself to overcome as necessary. For this reason (ah think) mah teacher trusts meh in learning these etudes after playing for such a short while. She even suggested ah try the winter wind next Undecided

If you are really looking for an etude to get into, ah suggest the 25-1 or the 10-9. These ah believe are the easiest. 10-6 is just weird to play (many flats but there are patterns) and ah know nothing of the 10-3. 25-12 would also be a suggestion. 25-5 the outer portion look manageable, but the inner parts frighten meh a bit.
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