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Topic: Performing for no one's approval  (Read 1306 times)

Offline plunkyplink

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Performing for no one's approval
on: May 11, 2006, 05:28:29 PM
Is there any pianists who can perform infront of an audience, or judges without really truly wanting their approval? I just have this thing where I consciously or unconsciously want approval from the people I play for. If I could lose that, I think I would enjoy playing infront of people more. Why should I care what people think? I can't control it! It's not logical, but it seems HUGE to overcome it.

Offline nsvppp

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Re: Performing for no one's approval
Reply #1 on: May 11, 2006, 08:47:08 PM
A different way of thinking is, that you tell a story to your audience. You help them to understand what you are playing, like telling them a fairy tale. They don't have to approve your story, but it would be great if they could understand it.

succes

Offline lostinidlewonder

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Re: Performing for no one's approval
Reply #2 on: May 12, 2006, 02:12:50 AM
Peoples opinions can either crush you or motivate you. If you can't help but listen to peoples opinions then use it to motivate you instead of trying to ignore it. Peoples opinions afterall are just that, an opinion. It isn't right or wrong, but how you use what they say can be manipulated in your head in a right way or wrong.

The struggle, work and effort in our music is battled by ourselves with our piano. When you play for people it isn't an effort, it is just the result of all of your effort. So if you play badly it isn't because you yourself are bad, but rather you have to put more effort in your work, push the blame of failure to your lack of work rather than some mysterious talent gas inside you which can never be changed.

Of course you must humble yourself and never think that you have ever completed the study of a piece. You will always get better the longer you know a piece, it grows with you. Even if people say WOW you played that brilliantly! You must be modest, because it  can be better and it is only a result of all your work. So too if someone says, you played that badly, you shouldn't get distressed because it is afterall only a result of all your work as well.
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Offline timothy42b

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Re: Performing for no one's approval
Reply #3 on: May 12, 2006, 06:16:27 AM
I'm not trying to be critical, but I think maybe you're on the wrong track.

True, the added stress of worrying about what people may think may make your performance less enjoyable. 

But I think you're attacking the wrong "root cause."  Playing for people is really what it's all about.  Music is communication, which must involve an interaction between a player and a listener.  Personally, I tend to see it as a customer service interaction, but you may not want to go quite that far yet. 

I think you might be better served by redefining your problem.  Call it performance anxiety instead if you have to have a name, and seek to reduce that while still striving to do your best FOR the audience. 
Tim

Offline aisling_7

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Re: Performing for no one's approval
Reply #4 on: May 13, 2006, 06:14:45 AM
I just did an audition to be reaccepted into a music program.  I asked my professor if all musicians get nervous, he said he gets worried if they don't!  He said that he had a student who didn't get nervous, who incidentally didn't play very well ;D.   Take the fairy tale advice.  I use to audition for plays, and I would get really nervous.  I thought of it this way: I may not get accepted to this play, but I can perform NOW.  I still get really nervous. Mostly my legs shake.  During this last audition, I was shaking enough that I was making the piano shake!  They say that you have to focus on every note, so dont' ignore any notes.  Remember they are all part of your story; let them be heard.

Jackie
There's nothing remarkable about it. All one has to do is hit the right keys at the right time and the instrument plays itself.
-- Johann Sebastian Bach

Offline thorn

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Re: Performing for no one's approval
Reply #5 on: May 13, 2006, 09:56:03 AM
I dont really care what other people think of my playing. Unless someone really blatantly says "that was absolute rubbish".. that would dishearten me majorly, but other than that, it's enough that I can enjoy the piece for myself.

If you enjoy the music, other people are more likely to enjoy it right?

Offline gorbee natcase

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Re: Performing for no one's approval
Reply #6 on: May 13, 2006, 04:26:48 PM
A different way of thinking is, that you tell a story to your audience. You help them to understand what you are playing, like telling them a fairy tale. They don't have to approve your story, but it would be great if they could understand it.

succes
I love romantics, they are the easyest piano folk to get along with :)
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Offline quantum

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Re: Performing for no one's approval
Reply #7 on: May 15, 2006, 10:06:37 AM
I like to think that positive approval is great, and a good source for musical inspiration.  Negative response (while not as pleasant) is also great, and gives an even stronger source for musical inspiration. 

Think of the good number of angry, furious, mad, stormy piano music that sounds really cool!!! 
Made a Liszt. Need new Handel's for Soler panel & Alkan foil. Will Faure Stein on the way to pick up Mendels' sohn. Josquin get Wolfgangs Schu with Clara. Gone Chopin, I'll be Bach
 

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