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A Jazz Piano Christmas 2022
There was a lot of love in the air when NPR’s annual A Jazz Piano Christmas concert and live taping took place this past weekend, Dec. 3, at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington. After more than two years of pandemic and lockdowns, audiences have been eager to get out and experience live music again and this event showed that plainly. Read more >>

Topic: J.S. Bach  (Read 1722 times)

Offline BoliverAllmon

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J.S. Bach
on: December 15, 2003, 06:07:00 PM
I think I found out way some on this forum dislike the genius of Bach. I was reading the preface to my beethoven sonata book and it put it like this.

Bach wrote in a polyphonic style. A style that atempts to make as many different voice repeating each other at the same time. Melody wasn't the main factor. Nearly everyone was to handle melody in some form or fashion.

Beethoven and others past him composed in a homophonic style. A style that has a very catchy soprano melody line with all other lines accompanying the soprano line.

I think that people hear love to sounds of beethoven, chopin, and others because of the melody line. They then listen to Bach and they want to hear the same thing, but Bach does not deliver because he composed differently.

By the way, I think I have found the first etudes. On the cover of Bach's English Suites, he states that these are "Keyboard exercises consisting of preludes, allemandes, courantes, sarabandes, gigues, minuets, and other gallantries."

boliver

Offline eddie92099

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Re: J.S. Bach
Reply #1 on: December 15, 2003, 06:13:54 PM
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Beethoven and others past him composed in a homophonic style. A style that has a very catchy soprano melody line with all other lines accompanying the soprano line.


Like...Wagner?!  ::),
Ed

Offline srdabney

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Re: J.S. Bach
Reply #2 on: December 16, 2003, 06:53:50 AM
Not to disagree entirely, but, there is quite a bit of counterpoint in Beethoven Sonatas. Not quite Bach counterpoint, but a really well played Beet. Sonata will bring out the second and third melodies in those seemingly inauspicious chords and albertis you refer to.  

Nice Wagner shot, btw ...  

I think Bach is dissed in piano circuit because he doesnt allow for technical brauvara. Thats why God invented Busoni ...

SRD

Offline cziffra

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Re: J.S. Bach
Reply #3 on: December 16, 2003, 04:19:41 PM
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Thats why God invented Busoni ...

and god bless the musically esoteric joke.  very funny, srdabney.   :D
What it all comes down to is that one does not play the piano with one’s fingers; one plays the piano with one’s mind.-  Glenn Gould
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