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Topic: Mozart's forte  (Read 1622 times)

Offline kghayesh

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Mozart's forte
on: June 11, 2006, 02:10:51 AM
I am kindda having some confusion here. I think i heard somewhere that Mozart is played in a special different way than all other composers.

Maybe this extra sensitive touch  and the crystal clear clarity required in his music make us approach in a different way and a quite different touch.

I am asking about how to play forte in Mozart. I think it can't be the same like Beethoven. You can play those sforzandos and get all these drama in Mozart. I think Mozart is inteded to flow so easily and gently as if it came by nature.

So maybe when playing Mozart, we are restricted to an upper limit of dynamics (so that we don't get to the level of 'banging' on the keys). That is, a Mozart forte is equivalent to a Beethoven's mezzo forte and so on..... I don't know i am just writing my thoughts.

Opinions needed please..........................

Offline ivoryplayer_amf

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Re: Mozart's forte
Reply #1 on: June 11, 2006, 02:52:16 AM
I was playing an early beethoveen sonatina for my piano professor at college and he told me that during that specific time in beethoveen's life, forte was not as loud as it was later in his life.  I would think that mozart is that way as well.  For me, I think of the difference between the classical forte and the romantic forte, (Which is what my professor was talking about).  I hope thats somewhat what you were asking.  My professor also said that another reason for the difference in forte was in the instruments.  He said that on early classical songs (Like some beethoveen sonatinas) the instruments didnt have as much of a forte as the later ones did in the romantic era. 

Just something to think about.

Offline mikey6

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Re: Mozart's forte
Reply #2 on: June 11, 2006, 10:32:14 AM
It's partly to do with the piano - it didn't have the dynamic range or strenth of the modern grand and I think it's got to do with style as well.  I don't think Mozart needs nor wants a heavy romantic forte.  He hardly ever writes FF and never FFF - even Beethoven rarley used FFF.
There's a certain restraint to Classical (era) music which I dont think warrants a massive sound.
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Offline pianistimo

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Re: Mozart's forte
Reply #3 on: June 11, 2006, 12:41:00 PM
agreed.  even sudden sfz in beethoven doesn't have to be crashing.  i've learned 'in context.'  those two words are extremely important.

Offline maxy

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Re: Mozart's forte
Reply #4 on: June 11, 2006, 04:52:42 PM
disagreed,  a lot of Beethoven pieces were meant for "future" instruments.  SFZ in Beethoven should never be done with a sense of :"I apologize". 

I like to think of Mozart as a bad boy with a temper, but it seems people want to make sure his music is tame...  forte, but not too much... 

Offline ivoryplayer_amf

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Re: Mozart's forte
Reply #5 on: June 11, 2006, 06:14:38 PM
disagreed,  a lot of Beethoven pieces were meant for "future" instruments.  SFZ in Beethoven should never be done with a sense of :"I apologize". 

I like to think of Mozart as a bad boy with a temper, but it seems people want to make sure his music is tame...  forte, but not too much... 

Not that I disagree with your latter statement about Mozart, but I don't understand your reasoning.  What makes you think Mozart "As a bad boy with a temper?"  I wouldd definately agree with you on your first statement about beethoveen, but not when it comes to his early years of composing during the transition from classic to romantic.

Offline chocolatedog

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Re: Mozart's forte
Reply #6 on: June 11, 2006, 09:50:14 PM
I always tend to think of Mozart and Haydn fortes as mezzo fortes. And try to keep the general sound light and sparkling and elegant as much as possible with careful balance.....

Offline pianistimo

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Re: Mozart's forte
Reply #7 on: June 11, 2006, 11:42:38 PM
there's places in mozart AND beethoven where sfz is used in a 'piano' context.  that's all i meant.  and, there are places where it is in a 'forte' context.  to not distinguish between the two is all i meant.

and, to distinguish between a mozart forte and a beethoven forte (esp. later years) is not disputed. 

seems that people think sfz means crashing in general, sometimes, but u have to make it purposeful and not a sudden shout in the ear - like ur totally deaf.

Offline jehangircama

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Re: Mozart's forte
Reply #8 on: June 13, 2006, 09:24:58 AM
the thing which i've noticed recently about beethoven is the positions of the SFZs, normally just before a p or a pp marking. So i think the main thing is how to bring out the contrast, not just how loud it is. Barenboim explains it well; he says that the music should appear to be heading towards the edge of a cliff, and at the last moment should be pulled back. as pianistimo said everything has to be in context, whether it is beethoven or mozart
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