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New Bach Recordings – Four Preludes & Fugues from WTC

Piano Street’s series of recordings of Bach’s Well-Tempered Clavier with pianist Martin Sturfält continues with four pairs of Preludes and Fugues, two from the first book and two from the second book Read more >>

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Author Topic: scales in chopin c# nocturne  (Read 1123 times)
just_me
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« on: February 01, 2007, 03:35:19 AM »

'allo! i'm working on the c# min nocturne (the posthumous one) and i was wondering what is the convention on rhythmic division of the scales in the last few measures that are divided into 18, 35, 11 and 13 divisions, distributed over two full beats.  should these ornaments be distributed equally (e.g., 18 = 9 notes up and 9 back down) OR should the apex of the glissando come ON the beat (it appears to precede it, so i was wondering if that is something unique to chopin or the period or...the typeset of the edition i'm using). if anyone has any guidelines on how to divide these and/OR a good way to practice these microdivisions with the metrenome, i'd really appreciate it!
thanks! 
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piano sheet music of Nocturne
sznitzeln
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« Reply #1 on: February 02, 2007, 07:19:51 PM »

Why not just listen to some recordings and doing what you feel sounds best?
I dont think there is any right or wrong.
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landru
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« Reply #2 on: February 02, 2007, 07:36:43 PM »

I am learning this one now, a page at a time, I am just done with page 2 - with the final page coming up with these scales. My teacher demonstrated them to me and also said that it is okay/customary to slightly slow the left hand during these scales to accentuate the phrase but make sure to get back smoothly to the original tempo in between the scales - my image is to take this as a wave breaking and receding as far as tempo and sound.

The main thing here is the sound/overall impression/musicality and not strict meeting which right hand note with which left hand note - which I think will lead to choppiness (at least I think so - as I said I haven't attempted it yet!!!)
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pianohenry
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« Reply #3 on: February 11, 2007, 09:27:37 PM »

when heard fluently, the scales sound more like an upwards and downwards flourish, rather than a scale; you dont particularly hear certain notes on certain beats. but to actually learn the timing, i find it was best to break the scales up into groups of 2s,3s,4s and 5s. so you know roughly how quickly you have to play the scale in order to distribute it evenly across the four left hand notes. then when it becomes more fluent it will sound better.
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