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Valentina Lisitsa on Searching for the Rachmaninoff Affinity

When Valentina Lisitsa came to Stockholm to play Rachmaninoff’s third piano concerto, it was a welcome fact not only for all her fans but also for anybody well aware of the enormous challenge this concerto means for any performer. In 2013 Lisitsa released her Complete Rachmaninoff Concertos (including the Paganini Rhapsody) on Decca and therefor this was a rare chance for Piano Street’s Patrick Jovell not to talk to her about YouTube but… Sergei Rachmaninoff. Read more >>

Poll
Question: What are the goldbergs
variations - 4 (80%)
polyphonic - 1 (20%)
suite - 0 (0%)
Total Voters: 5

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Author Topic: goldbergs  (Read 3021 times)
imbetter
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« on: March 10, 2007, 02:19:37 PM »

I've been curious of this for along time. start voting
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"My advice to young musicians: Quit music! There is no choice. It has to be a calling, and even if it is and you think there's a choice, there is no choice"-Vladimir Feltsman

piano sheet music of Goldberg Variations
nicco
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« Reply #1 on: March 10, 2007, 02:24:30 PM »

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goldberg_Variations
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"Without music, life would be a mistake." - Friedrich Nietzsche
mikey6
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« Reply #2 on: March 10, 2007, 11:40:19 PM »

 Huh
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Never look at the trombones. You'll only encourage them.
Richard Strauss
thalberg
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« Reply #3 on: March 10, 2007, 11:59:28 PM »

Okay, they're variations.

But they're variations on a BASS LINE, not a melody.  Once you know that, you'll be much happier when listening.  And beware the descending chromatic tetrachord.
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leahcim
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« Reply #4 on: March 11, 2007, 03:36:02 PM »


The Goldberg Variations were once seen as a dry and rather boring technical exercise. Today, however, they are seen as merely dry and rather boring...

The joys of wikipedia? Cheesy
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Mozartian
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« Reply #5 on: March 13, 2007, 02:31:38 AM »


hah thanks nicco, now I know what I'll be reading tonight. Tongue

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[lau] 10:01 pm: like in 10/4 i think those little slurs everywhere are pointless for the music, but I understand if it was for improving technique
thecrow
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« Reply #6 on: March 27, 2007, 08:06:16 PM »

Hello, I'm new to this forum. I love listening and playing (sight reading really) the Goldberg Variations. The first time I heard them was in Northern Ontario (Canada) at a friend's cottage (I was 20 years old). I was relaxing in the lake, just floating around when my friend put Glenn Gould's 2nd recording of the Goldbergs on and turned up the volume so I could hear it on the lake. It was incredible! I'm not sure what it is but I love to listen to it and I also get great satisfaction when I play these variations (even though I'm playing them very slowly). Maybe because this music is attached to the great memories of being up at the cottage, I'm not sure. Anyway, I know it's a bit off the original topic, I just can't help myself.
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