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Chopin Etudes (Read 1821 times)

Offline akonow

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Chopin Etudes
« on: February 29, 2008, 12:21:23 AM »
Hi, I've been playing the piano for about 3 years now and I just finished learning Etude Op. 10 No. 3 by Chopin and I've really been wanting to learn another etude. Specifically, I had Op. 10 No. 4, Op. 10 No. 8, Op. 10 No. 9, and Op. 10 No. 12 in mind. Would these pieces be too difficult for me to try right away? ??? Annnd... if there are any other Chopin etudes that would maybe be easier, please share. :) Thanks for your time.

Sheet music to download and print: Etudes by Chopin



Offline lau

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Re: Chopin Etudes
«Reply #1 on: February 29, 2008, 03:01:09 AM »
i might want to just stay away from those etudes for now, but if you must....25/1 i think is one of the "easiest" ones. Perhaps work up some inspiration admiration for an easier set of works for now. Or just go for it and see what happens, sometimes it can work out surprisingly well, but it isn't likely, i don't think.
i'm not asian

Offline akonow

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Re: Chopin Etudes
«Reply #2 on: February 29, 2008, 03:55:58 AM »
What would be a good intermediary piece for Op. 25 No. 1? :)

Offline amelialw

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Re: Chopin Etudes
«Reply #3 on: February 29, 2008, 05:18:10 AM »
you should talk to your teacher if you have one? she/he would have a better idea of what you are capable off.

well, to give us an idea of your level what other pieces are you learning now?

not even taking the fact into consideration that you have only learnt the piano for 3 yrs, there if no particular order that everyone learns the etudes in. Everyone has their own strengths and weaknesses so the order of which the etudes are learnt in is always different.
what my teacher believes is that even learning one page of each etude can benefit an individual if he/she is at that stage where they can't handle the whole etude yet. Even if you can't handle it at full speed, still if the technique is learnt correctly and taught properly the individual can benefit alot.

for I myself, before I even started, I played around with a few like op.10 no.4,5,8 and op.25 no.1,7 and 11. Would have liked to start off with op.10 no.4 or 5 but after sampling each for about 2 weeks I could'nt go any further and decided to start off with op.10 no.8. Took a year to master it but it was well worth the effort. Started op.10 no.5 in in may'07 but I have put it aside as I can't handle the last few bars now. Currently finishing op.10 no.4 and learning the rest slowly.



J.S Bach Italian Concerto,Beethoven Sonata op.2 no.2,Mozart Sonatas K.330&333,Chopin Scherzo no.2,Etude op.10 no.12&Fantasie Impromptu

Offline akonow

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Re: Chopin Etudes
«Reply #4 on: February 29, 2008, 05:43:09 AM »
Well, right now I'm playing the posthumous Nocturne in C minor, a Bach invention, a Beethoven Sonata, and Waltz in B Minor Op. 69 No. 2 but I've pretty much finished up all of them. I've found I seem to be better at learning music from the Romantic period.

Offline gerry

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Re: Chopin Etudes
«Reply #5 on: February 29, 2008, 06:19:00 AM »
I have to say here that if you have only been playing for 3 years and you have just finished "learning" op10#3 you are quite accomplished. That being said, though, I've heard many beginners attempt to play this Etude because it seems the most accessible only to subsequently have them barely make it through the center section chromatics and 6ths - they remain very difficult even for more accomplished musicians to play "up to speed" and in a way that blends in with and completes the rest of the piece. Without hearing you play, it's hard to tell how you define "learning". If you have really mastered the whole piece and can handle this center section successfully then you are indeed ready to move on to another. As for the others you have indicated, you need to sit down and try to read through them - you will know soon enough if they are beyond you at the present time. I think as a 3rd year student, I'm not sure so much time spent on Chopin Etudes is the best use of your time--there's more to achieving musicianship than learning the crowd-pleasing show pieces--
but that is between you and your teacher. BTW there are other Etudes like the Moskowski ones that are useful, accessible, and can be incorporated into a recital. Good luck.
Durch alle Töne tönet
Im bunten Erdentraum
Ein leiser Ton gezogen
Für den, der heimlich lauschet.

Offline akonow

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Re: Chopin Etudes
«Reply #6 on: February 29, 2008, 06:23:09 AM »
Thanks for your feedback. :) I find that I have weak fourth and fifth fingers and this made "learning" the etude very time-consuming. Which pieces do you suggest, gerry?

Offline gyzzzmo

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Re: Chopin Etudes
«Reply #7 on: February 29, 2008, 07:39:38 AM »
if youre 4 and 5th finger are so bad, start practising 10/2. Its a great etude for making those fingers better.
I would advice you to read this ( http://www.pianostreet.com/smf/index.php/topic,28636.0.html ) topic very well for general advice how to handle them.

gyzzzmo
1+1=11

Offline akonow

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Re: Chopin Etudes
«Reply #8 on: February 29, 2008, 07:46:20 AM »
Thanks. That was really helpful. :D

Offline gerry

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Re: Chopin Etudes
«Reply #9 on: February 29, 2008, 07:55:14 AM »
Op10#2 would have been my suggestion also.
Durch alle Töne tönet
Im bunten Erdentraum
Ein leiser Ton gezogen
Für den, der heimlich lauschet.

Offline akonow

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Re: Chopin Etudes
«Reply #10 on: February 29, 2008, 08:20:35 AM »
I just saw that Op. 10 No. 2 is Grade 8+. Why?

Offline gerry

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Re: Chopin Etudes
«Reply #11 on: February 29, 2008, 09:40:42 AM »
Forget the grade stuff  - just go for it!
Durch alle Töne tönet
Im bunten Erdentraum
Ein leiser Ton gezogen
Für den, der heimlich lauschet.

Offline gyzzzmo

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Re: Chopin Etudes
«Reply #12 on: February 29, 2008, 12:24:10 PM »
I just saw that Op. 10 No. 2 is Grade 8+. Why?

To get it to performance level is very hard yes, but you can use this etude to train those 4/5 fingers anyway. Just dont rush, its about getting technique for you, not about being able to get this one to performance level ;)

gl, gyzzzmo
1+1=11

Offline nyonyo

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Re: Chopin Etudes
«Reply #13 on: February 29, 2008, 03:46:08 PM »
for I myself, before I even started, I played around with a few like op.10 no.4,5,8 and op.25 no.1,7 and 11. Would have liked to start off with op.10 no.4 or 5 but after sampling each for about 2 weeks I could'nt go any further and decided to start off with op.10 no.8. Took a year to master it but it was well worth the effort. Started op.10 no.5 in in may'07 but I have put it aside as I can't handle the last few bars now. Currently finishing op.10 no.4 and learning the rest slowly.

My teacher always says that Chopin etude is one of the indicator to discern people with technical prowess from the regular people.  I personally also believe this, if one can play most of Chopin etudes without too much difficulties, he or she has the technical ability to perform difficult pieces.

If it takes a long time to master those etudes (more than two months per etude) with 3 to 4 hours of practicing time, basically one has lack of technical capability to become a concert pianist. What do you guys think?

Offline amelialw

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Re: Chopin Etudes
«Reply #14 on: February 29, 2008, 04:03:20 PM »
My teacher always says that Chopin etude is one of the indicator to discern people with technical prowess from the regular people.  I personally also believe this, if one can play most of Chopin etudes without too much difficulties, he or she has the technical ability to perform difficult pieces.

If it takes a long time to master those etudes (more than two months per etude) with 3 to 4 hours of practicing time, basically one has lack of technical capability to become a concert pianist. What do you guys think?

I agree, but  would have to say except the 1st etude that one attempts to learn.
Usually after learning the 1st 1 or 2, the rest will be much easier to cope with. I know that i've only had op.10 no.4 for 2 months+ with 1 hr for that etude every 2 days and have it up at full-speed with minor corrections.
J.S Bach Italian Concerto,Beethoven Sonata op.2 no.2,Mozart Sonatas K.330&333,Chopin Scherzo no.2,Etude op.10 no.12&Fantasie Impromptu

Offline thierry13

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Re: Chopin Etudes
«Reply #15 on: February 29, 2008, 04:09:17 PM »
Hi, I've been playing the piano for about 3 years now and I just finished learning Etude Op. 10 No. 3 by Chopin and I've really been wanting to learn another etude. Specifically, I had Op. 10 No. 4, Op. 10 No. 8, Op. 10 No. 9, and Op. 10 No. 12 in mind. Would these pieces be too difficult for me to try right away? ??? Annnd... if there are any other Chopin etudes that would maybe be easier, please share. :) Thanks for your time.

stay away from 4 and 8 ... 9 is easy if your hands are not too small and 12 I guess would be possible to try out ...