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Chopin Prelude no. 1 (Read 5265 times)

Offline daejiny

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Chopin Prelude no. 1
« on: April 03, 2008, 07:57:09 PM »
Ok, this is my first recording ever - and as my recording shows, I was a bit unprepared on the piano the school had (a nice Baldwin). It's a bit too bright and loud, or maybe they're just the school speakers. But here it is. Criticism and comments appreciated.

piano sheet music of Prelude


Offline gyzzzmo

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Re: Chopin Prelude no. 1
«Reply #1 on: April 04, 2008, 03:50:20 PM »
Bit hard to give comment on this piece. Alot of people play it in many ways. The notes are correct ofcourse (although it sounds like a honky tonk piano ;) )
I like playing it melody wise (thumb of right has melody), but thats more personal. Martha Argerich plays it like you, but then with more pedal and alot faster. Try my way, and then do whatever you like ;)

gyzzzmo
1+1=11

Offline daejiny

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Re: Chopin Prelude no. 1
«Reply #2 on: April 04, 2008, 06:12:12 PM »
Hmm, yes, the piano sounds a bit bad. In life though, I have no complaints about the piano. The tuning was off (it was tuned about 4 hours after I recorded).

About playing it with the right thumb, I've tried it that way too, but I like the Rubinstein version better, with the last and 3rd to last right hand notes having melody. I will record your way too, and see how it sounds.

Thanks for the response though.

Offline rachfan

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Re: Chopin Prelude no. 1
«Reply #3 on: April 05, 2008, 02:47:10 AM »
Hi daijiny,

You have the notes down, but the playing seems to have some bumpiness and turbulence in it.  I believe if you could smooth it out a bit, it would be more pleasing and creditable.  Below is a link to my own recording (using my Baldwin Model L grand).   It's not Rubinstein
 ;D, but it might give you a different perspective on the piece.  This isn't an easy piece to play.  Good effort!

http://www.pianostreet.com/smf/index.php/topic,19328.0.html
Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities.

Offline daejiny

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Re: Chopin Prelude no. 1
«Reply #4 on: April 05, 2008, 07:39:40 PM »
rachfan, thanks for responding, but could you explain the "bumpiness/turbulence" a bit more? As in, is it the rhythm? Or the notes themselves? Because I myself can hear me banging the notes out in the quintuplets, and the piano does sound honky-tonky, as gyzzzmo mentioned (must be the mp3).

I will record again, to be sure.

Offline rachfan

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Re: Chopin Prelude no. 1
«Reply #5 on: April 06, 2008, 03:56:06 AM »
Hi daejiny,

Yes, the clangy piano does not assist you much in this recording.  It needs work, and not just tuning!   :D

No, you don't exhibit any rhythmic problem.  Some pianists do fall into the trap of playing this prelude in 3/8, but you correctly execute it in 2/8 as written.  And your quintuplets are fine.  You "push through" them in the stretto section very nicely to create a surge there.

I believe there are three other performance necessities in this brief piece: 1) Always play the long line (and you're on the right track there).  2) As to technique, always roll the left hand bass upward toward the objective with the right taking over totally seamlessly. 

I listened again tonight, and believe the "bumps" I hear occur for three reasons: 1) When the right hand plays the second beat in a measure, it is always executing double notes.  What's required there is to voice the top notes only while very much deemphasizing the bottom notes.  2) Also, the second beat in 2/8 is, of course, a weaker beat, so must be played with less emphasis than the downbeat.  And: 3) The last 16th note in any measure played by the right hand ends a phrase, so there must be a noticeable tapered, lilting lift-off with the forearm and wrist, resulting in that last note being gently softer than the earlier part of the phrase.  (Same with the left hand phrase endings as well.)  Often you play those 16ths almost marcato such that there is little differentiation volume-wise between those last 16ths and what preceded them.  Makes it sound a little boisterous.  The punching of those notes contributes to the bumps.       

So, I believe that if you could play the second beat as more of a less-pronounced weaker beat while, voicing the tops of the double notes more, and then gently taper off the quieter final 16ths in those measures, the flow will become more fluid, seamless and pleasant.  And you'll like the additional clarity in your playing.

Just my opinion.  I hope this helps.
Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities.

Offline daejiny

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Re: Chopin Prelude no. 1
«Reply #6 on: April 07, 2008, 03:44:21 PM »
Ok, thank you for explaining.

The piano sounds like that only in the recording, and I don't know why. Maybe the compression was terrible, and took out many tones. Because as I said, in life it sounds very nice.

But thanks for the rest, it's pretty helpful. Yes, it does help, and I'll try it.

On a side note, how long have you played the piano? Because this is my second year.

Offline rachfan

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Re: Chopin Prelude no. 1
«Reply #7 on: April 07, 2008, 05:02:41 PM »
Hi daeginy,

I hate to admit it, but I've been playing the piano for 55 years now.   :)  If this is only your second year, my hat is off to you.  I'm amazed that you can play a piece at this level so well!  Keep up the good work!
Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities.

Offline Karli

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Re: Chopin Prelude no. 1
«Reply #8 on: April 08, 2008, 02:44:10 AM »
.

Offline gyzzzmo

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Re: Chopin Prelude no. 1
«Reply #9 on: April 08, 2008, 09:58:51 AM »
Hi daeginy,

I hate to admit it, but I've been playing the piano for 55 years now.   :)  If this is only your second year, my hat is off to you.  I'm amazed that you can play a piece at this level so well!  Keep up the good work!

I have to admit i play this piece in 3/8, mainly because i like the piece more that way. You're probably right that it should be played in 2/8, but i'm enjoying my musical freedom as a teacherless pianist ;)
1+1=11

Offline rachfan

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Re: Chopin Prelude no. 1
«Reply #10 on: April 09, 2008, 10:15:42 PM »
Hi gyzzzmo,

Welllllll... yeah, there are a couple of advantages to being teacher-less for sure.  It's kinda like "the noose is loose". :D  But in the matter of time signatures, there's no real flexibility there, as they are what they are.  Be mindful too that you always have to serve the composer to the best of your ability, with or without a teacher enforcing rules.  It's a high ideal, especially when you're learning on your own.  In your situation (and mine) there are no teachers to blame, so accountability for performance falls directly on our own shoulders.  The good news is that in this prelude, you're well aware that you're playing it in 2/8--more often pianists actually do that unknowingly. 
Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities.

Offline daejiny

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Re: Chopin Prelude no. 1
«Reply #11 on: April 10, 2008, 12:04:20 AM »
Hi daeginy,

I hate to admit it, but I've been playing the piano for 55 years now.   :)  If this is only your second year, my hat is off to you.  I'm amazed that you can play a piece at this level so well!  Keep up the good work!

Well, thank you. But I must return the compliments to someone who has been learning the piano such a long time. The dedication required must be amazing.

And thank you Karli.

Offline rachfan

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Re: Chopin Prelude no. 1
«Reply #12 on: April 10, 2008, 01:07:18 AM »
Hi daejiny,

When I was young I studied for 10 years with a wonderful teacher who gave me all the fundamentals of musical styles, theory and performance.  Then when I was around 40, I studied for another 7 years with an artist-teacher who taught me the fine points of musicianship and performance.  Much of the emphasis the second time around was on interpretation.  Certainly while doing formal studies, it did take dedication, as you surmised.  Since I've been studying on my own though, it's much more my passion for music.  Piano has always been a big part of my life, and I never tire of it.  There's always a new piece to learn.
Interpreting music means exploring the promise of the potential of possibilities.

Offline gyzzzmo

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Re: Chopin Prelude no. 1
«Reply #13 on: April 10, 2008, 08:54:25 AM »
Hi gyzzzmo,

Welllllll... yeah, there are a couple of advantages to being teacher-less for sure.  It's kinda like "the noose is loose". :D  But in the matter of time signatures, there's no real flexibility there, as they are what they are.  Be mindful too that you always have to serve the composer to the best of your ability, with or without a teacher enforcing rules.  It's a high ideal, especially when you're learning on your own.  In your situation (and mine) there are no teachers to blame, so accountability for performance falls directly on our own shoulders.  The good news is that in this prelude, you're well aware that you're playing it in 2/8--more often pianists actually do that unknowingly. 

Sometimes i also think i should take a teacher once. Now if im playing pieces i play them in a way i feel at that moment, a teacher would probably make my overall performance better, and also broaden my repetoire alot ;) (my repetoire is for like 70% chopin, 20% liszt and the rest abit bach and schubert  :-[ ) Maybe when i'm like 40....
Btw, im playing Choped 25/2 in 4/4, instead of 2/4. Although Chopin is pretty dead, maybe i should 'serve' him better there too. But in 2/4 its so boringly easy :p

gyzzzmo
1+1=11