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Chopin Etudes progression (Read 2599 times)

Offline aewanko

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Chopin Etudes progression
« on: May 31, 2008, 10:59:40 AM »
I recently bought a book of Chopin's Etudes. And I'm wondering where to start. Something slow? Fast? I don't know. If I can't play these, then it would be a waste of $9.

Sheet music is rare here in our country. Very lame, no Liszt, Schubert, etc.

Trying to return to playing the piano.

Sheet music to download and print: Etudes by Chopin



Offline dan101

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Re: Chopin Etudes progression
«Reply #1 on: May 31, 2008, 11:54:33 AM »
All Chopin studies have built in difficulties. After all, they were written for students building technique.

I would start with the slower op. 10. no 3 or op. 25 no. 1. Do a lot of slow practice. Have fun.
Daniel E. Friedman, owner of www.musicmasterstudios.com
You CAN learn to play the piano and compose in a fun and effective way.

Offline aewanko

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Re: Chopin Etudes progression
«Reply #2 on: May 31, 2008, 12:53:18 PM »
All Chopin studies have built in difficulties. After all, they were written for students building technique.

I would start with the slower op. 10. no 3 or op. 25 no. 1. Do a lot of slow practice. Have fun.

I'll go with the "Aeolian Harp" and see how it goes. Maybe a "seperate hands" practice.
Trying to return to playing the piano.

Offline michel dvorsky

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Re: Chopin Etudes progression
«Reply #3 on: June 01, 2008, 11:04:51 PM »
Start with the easiest ones (i.e., 10/2, 25/6, 10/4) then once you've mastered those you can start some of the harder ones.
"Sokolov did a SH***Y job of playing Rachmaninoff's 3rd Piano Concerto." - Perfect_Pitch

Offline aewanko

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Re: Chopin Etudes progression
«Reply #4 on: June 02, 2008, 12:08:13 AM »
Start with the easiest ones (i.e., 10/2, 25/6, 10/4) then once you've mastered those you can start some of the harder ones.

Any tips for the speed of these? Besides, I can't really practice, you know. My piano only has 61 keys.
Trying to return to playing the piano.

Offline michel dvorsky

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Re: Chopin Etudes progression
«Reply #5 on: June 02, 2008, 01:19:24 AM »
Any tips for the speed of these? Besides, I can't really practice, you know. My piano only has 61 keys.

LOL.
"Sokolov did a SH***Y job of playing Rachmaninoff's 3rd Piano Concerto." - Perfect_Pitch

Offline pmz310

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Re: Chopin Etudes progression
«Reply #6 on: June 02, 2008, 01:22:17 AM »
Start with the easiest ones (i.e., 10/2, 25/6, 10/4) then once you've mastered those you can start some of the harder ones.

yo, are you mentally retarded? these are the HARDEST
"Lets put a smile on that face of yours" -Heath Ledger

Offline michel dvorsky

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Re: Chopin Etudes progression
«Reply #7 on: June 02, 2008, 01:28:26 AM »
yo, are you mentally retarded? these are the HARDEST

O OK THX.. I didn't no dat. respect 4 da correxxion.

"Sokolov did a SH***Y job of playing Rachmaninoff's 3rd Piano Concerto." - Perfect_Pitch

Offline pmz310

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Re: Chopin Etudes progression
«Reply #8 on: June 02, 2008, 12:38:45 PM »
its all good bro
"Lets put a smile on that face of yours" -Heath Ledger

Offline aewanko

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Re: Chopin Etudes progression
«Reply #9 on: June 03, 2008, 06:21:59 AM »
i can't do this anymore!
Trying to return to playing the piano.

Offline gregh87

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Re: Chopin Etudes progression
«Reply #10 on: June 06, 2008, 05:44:11 PM »
I think the Black Key Etude (10.5?) and Revolutionary are easier than they sound, and they are more fun to play than 10.3 and 25.1 imo.

Offline mike_lang

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Re: Chopin Etudes progression
«Reply #11 on: June 06, 2008, 06:39:16 PM »
Why not just play the one that sounds the most appealing to you?

Offline a-sharp

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Re: Chopin Etudes progression
«Reply #12 on: June 06, 2008, 07:38:08 PM »
 ::) (the thread in general, not the post above. sorry - short attention span today.)

Offline aewanko

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Re: Chopin Etudes progression
«Reply #13 on: June 07, 2008, 01:10:14 AM »
Why not just play the one that sounds the most appealing to you?

As I said, my keyboard only has 61 keys. And my favorite is the "Winter Wind" etude.

I think the Black Key Etude (10.5?) and Revolutionary are easier than they sound, and they are more fun to play than 10.3 and 25.1 imo.

Again, keyboard issues.

See? If only I had an 88-keyed piano, I'd do these etudes with ease (exaggeration).
Trying to return to playing the piano.

Offline mike_lang

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Re: Chopin Etudes progression
«Reply #14 on: June 07, 2008, 01:19:32 AM »
As I said, my keyboard only has 61 keys. And my favorite is the "Winter Wind" etude.

I understand - so find the one that is closest to that range.  The most important criteria are that you like it and are therefore motivated to practice it, and that you can play it on your instrument.



Offline ahkow

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Re: Chopin Etudes progression
«Reply #15 on: June 07, 2008, 09:03:05 AM »
op.10 no.2 one octave lower probably works?

Offline Nightscape

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Re: Chopin Etudes progression
«Reply #16 on: June 07, 2008, 11:27:07 AM »
These pieces are not to be taken lightly - if I were you I wouldn't learn any of them until you have mastered all of the basics and intermediates of playing the piano.  To play these etudes well advances you into a higher realm of piano playing.

It's just my opinion, but I think they should be learned in order, at least within the individual sets.  This might seem strange, seeing how difficult op. 10 no.1 is, but if you have tackled that etude and learned it well, the next etude seems like a logical step - and has become much easier now that you will have learned control of the weaker part of the hand.  These etudes were a radical reworking of piano technique that Chopin sought, and by learning them seriously in this manner you can realize his vision for yourself.  But only when you are ready to (and of course, only when you have access to a full length piano!  But sometimes there is nothing we can do about this.)

However, if you are interested in the etudes not for their didactic value, but for their intrinsic beauty (ideally, you would be interested in both!), the easier etudes to learn and play just for fun are the ones they don't require as much tricky technical demands.  op. 10 no. 3 (although the middle section is not easy at all), op.10 no. 6, op. 25 no. 7.  op.25 no.1 isn't too bad either, but it is really difficult to get it to sound as it really should, as intermediate pianists tend to butcher it.

But, if you don't feel confident to play them, there is no rush to!  They will always be there, tempting pianists....