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Topic: Chopin Etudes - Beneficial Slowly?  (Read 5236 times)

Offline mukubella

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Chopin Etudes - Beneficial Slowly?
on: July 07, 2008, 06:07:43 AM
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Offline richy321

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Re: Chopin Etudes - Beneficial Slowly?
Reply #1 on: July 07, 2008, 05:31:29 PM
This is my favorite etude, because of that soulful melody in the middle section. The rhythmic shift for the repetition is also intriguing.

Slow practice is necessary just to get the notes right in the beginning, but it won't guarantee success.  What is needed is to learn how to support every single note in the arpreggios so that each note is securely and efficiently produced.  It is the doubles embedded in the arpeggios that make it so difficult. That requires coordinating the entire body to achieve the desired musical end.  In other words, it requires advanced technique, and it must be built on a solid foundation.

I struggled with this piece for years without making real progress.  Then, a year ago, due to a serious injury (caused by unwise attempt on another Chopin etude), I went to a teacher to rebuild my technique, literally from the ground up.  I am not up to playing Chopin yet, but I think I have a much better idea of how to approach this etude when I do get back to it.  It will take the full deployment of everything I've learned about coordinated, tension-free, balanced, efficient playing.   

In short, I don't think slow practice or endless hours of practice will give you success with this piece, unless you have a solid technique to begin with.

     

Offline concorde331

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Re: Chopin Etudes - Beneficial Slowly?
Reply #2 on: July 20, 2008, 12:56:19 AM
Playing some of the études slowly helps a LOT, especially with working out the fingering and proper technique to be used.  I recently did the ocean (25.12, C minor) and I had to play that piece at half tempo (and sometimes even less) to build the correct fingering and proper hand positions.

Give Op. 10 no. 6 a shot.  It's marked at andante and is supposed to be played relatively slowly.  It sounds great, and it gives both hands a good workout (there's a lot of inner voicing), while not straining them.

I love the way Op. 25 no. 5 sounds but I've never actually sat down and really worked on it.  (I've fiddled around with bits and pieces of it.)

Richy, what étude did you try that caused your injury?  I'm just curious to know.
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Offline mukubella

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Re: Chopin Etudes - Beneficial Slowly?
Reply #3 on: August 02, 2008, 04:45:54 AM
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Offline cherub_rocker1979

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Re: Chopin Etudes - Beneficial Slowly?
Reply #4 on: August 04, 2008, 05:42:59 AM
Yes, slow practice is very important when learning these challenging pieces.  The technique required to play the Etude Op. 25 No. 12 was discussed in detail here https://pimpmypiano.com/Forum.htm under the "Compositions" section.  I hope you find the information given there useful.

Offline a-sharp

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Re: Chopin Etudes - Beneficial Slowly?
Reply #5 on: August 04, 2008, 06:46:23 AM
I believe not in slow practice, but slow motion practice... if the piece is ultimately placed fast...

Offline Bob

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Re: Chopin Etudes - Beneficial Slowly?
Reply #6 on: August 05, 2008, 03:07:29 AM
It's probaby not going to hurt to play them at any speed.  As long as you're getting something out of it.

I had one teacher tell me to just play as much as you can, even if it's badly.  That's assuming you come back to it late in life.  The point was to get stuff into your head and fingers.  That's the quantity over quality method I guess.
Favorite new teacher quote -- "You found the only possible wrong answer."

Offline cherub_rocker1979

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Re: Chopin Etudes - Beneficial Slowly?
Reply #7 on: August 08, 2008, 04:35:27 AM
Just wanted to apologize to those who have been trying to access PimpMyPiano.  I'm pleased to announce that the forum is now in working condition!
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