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Video:Chopin Ballade No.1 (Read 3091 times)

Offline yw1935

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piano sheet music of Ballade 1


Offline teresa_b

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Re: Video:Chopin Ballade No.1
«Reply #1 on: July 10, 2008, 12:07:59 PM »
The audition room seems to have become the "Rachel" recital room.  Anyway, I listened to this Chopin ballade, the etude, and some of the Bach-Busoni Chaconne. 

I think this little girl is extremely talented, but across the board she is playing pieces far too difficult for her.  She is obviously struggling in the Ballade even to reach the notes. 

As I see it, one or two pieces out of one's difficulty range are not a bad thing, but if most of them are, then you have a problem.  You must use everything you've got just to play the notes to the exclusion of dynamics and phrasing.  The playing here is mechanical and does not stir the emotions of the listener. 

A child may not be able to lend the degree of emotional depth that a more experienced player might, but if given the right repertoire, I fully believe this girl could play much more convincingly. 

Teresa


Offline imbetter

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Re: Video:Chopin Ballade No.1
«Reply #2 on: July 10, 2008, 04:44:39 PM »
The audition room seems to have become the "Rachel" recital room.  Anyway, I listened to this Chopin ballade, the etude, and some of the Bach-Busoni Chaconne. 

I think this little girl is extremely talented, but across the board she is playing pieces far too difficult for her.  She is obviously struggling in the Ballade even to reach the notes. 

As I see it, one or two pieces out of one's difficulty range are not a bad thing, but if most of them are, then you have a problem.  You must use everything you've got just to play the notes to the exclusion of dynamics and phrasing.  The playing here is mechanical and does not stir the emotions of the listener. 

A child may not be able to lend the degree of emotional depth that a more experienced player might, but if given the right repertoire, I fully believe this girl could play much more convincingly. 

Teresa



I agree 100%

having a girl her age play all of these pieces is only doing her a mis justice. She clearly does not yet posses the technical or musical means to play this piece.
"My advice to young musicians: Quit music! There is no choice. It has to be a calling, and even if it is and you think there's a choice, there is no choice"-Vladimir Feltsman

Offline welltemperedpianist

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Re: Video:Chopin Ballade No.1
«Reply #3 on: July 17, 2008, 08:16:56 PM »
Yes, I would have to agree teresa on this. (as well as audition room becoming "Rachel's" recital room... I commented on her recordings before, and many of them are quite excellent and thoughtful. However, I almost feel that as a 10 year old -- she would probably benefit better learning pieces that are within her level, after all she has plenty of time to learn difficult pieces. Now though, I feel she's being forcefully pushed by her asian parents to have her life devoted to the piano and learn pieces which she is not capable in order to please their want of a "talented prodigy". And that's very unfortunate.

Sorry for the harsh comment, I just strongly disagree with this practice of using children to show off.

Offline perfect_pitch

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Re: Video:Chopin Ballade No.1
«Reply #4 on: July 18, 2008, 01:53:49 PM »
Sorry for the harsh comment, I just strongly disagree with this practice of using children to show off.

Dont be... I mean considering most of these kids start piano before they even realise truly what they are doing... I can't remember ever being asked anything at the age of 2... and I doubt that Rachel can either.

And unfortunately she does have the emotional depth of a twig... but thats because she's only 10. What she must realise to become a true musician is that notes is one thing... beauty is another.

I have a students that came to our university... and was brilliant technically... playing since he was 2. The first time he played Rachmaninoffs Variations on a theme by Paganini, the uni students were blown away at what he could play.

The second time however, when he played the first 4 of Chopins Op 10 Etudes... The audience realised just how stale his performances were. It was very sad to see someone brilliant technically but shoddy emotionally.

Offline pianistimo

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Re: Video:Chopin Ballade No.1
«Reply #5 on: August 08, 2008, 07:47:43 AM »
i admire this girl.  hardly any students nowdays have perseverance to listen well to a teacher, practice this much, and respect their parents.  i disagree.  i think that if she loves music and wants to practice - let her practice.  many portions of this piece showed great musicality, clear pedalling, good finger dexterity, PERFECT phrasing, and LEADS TO THE ENDING.  I've heard adults that simply could not compete with this at 50% and she is 10 years old.

amazing.  keep it up.  and just play what you like.  if you don't want to play simple pieces - kudo's to you.  you'll probably progress faster this way - even if it is a great deal of work right now.

Offline yw1935

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Re: Video:Chopin Ballade No.1
«Reply #6 on: August 31, 2008, 12:10:18 AM »
Thanks for your encouragement.Rachel still has much room to improve.She play this piece only after 3 lessons.Now she played much better.
Some professional has prejudice against kids playing big pieces.but I think it's by cases

Offline ramseytheii

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Re: Video:Chopin Ballade No.1
«Reply #7 on: September 05, 2008, 11:24:37 PM »
I don't think it is just prejudice.  When a person listens to music being performed, they want to be able to focus on the music.  When a child plays pieces like for instance the first ballade, the primary point of the performance, the focal point, is that a child is playing the first ballade.  The focal point is not the ballade.

I agree that talented children should be encouraged to challenge themselves, and learn big pieces.  I disagree that they should play them publicly; they shouldn't do that until they can make a musical event out of it.

Walter Ramsey



Offline yw1935

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Re: Video:Chopin Ballade No.1
«Reply #8 on: September 06, 2008, 03:48:35 AM »
Thanks for comment.I agree

Offline ganymed

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Re: Video:Chopin Ballade No.1
«Reply #9 on: September 07, 2008, 01:08:42 AM »
you cannot force a girl to play such extremely difficult pieces.
Unless she really loves playing piano from the bottom of her heart.
If she really likes playing  and enjoys practicing hard so much
then why not let her do it ????

this is really amazing actually that she into classical music that much. I think it needs maturity and good listening to even appreciate this hard piece.
"We can never know what to want, because, living only one life, we can neither compare it with our previous lives nor perfect it in our lives to come."

Milan Kundera,The Unbearable Lightness of Being

Offline ramseytheii

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Re: Video:Chopin Ballade No.1
«Reply #10 on: September 07, 2008, 12:46:18 PM »
In his editorial notes to his edition of Beethoven's Sonata op.110 (they are all published individually), Sir Donald Francis Tovey addressed the "experience" issue, as we might call it in America today.  He said that the last sonatas were often withheld from students, because they lacked "experience," and they needed to grow more before they played them.  He made the point that how can one have experience, except by gaining it through acquaintance with the most challenging repertoire?

Walter Ramsey



Offline thierry13

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Re: Video:Chopin Ballade No.1
«Reply #11 on: September 12, 2008, 07:26:09 PM »
He made the point that how can one have experience, except by gaining it through acquaintance with the most challenging repertoire?

I think those sonatas should be learned early, but performed later. It is not only playing experience, it is life experience. It takes time. But there's nothing wrong in LEARNING it, I would simply wait if I wanted to play it in an official concert, or even record it.

Offline martha argerrrrrich

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Re: Video:Chopin Ballade No.1
«Reply #12 on: September 12, 2008, 07:34:56 PM »
this reminds me of the 2008 beijeing olympics and the "new born" chinese kids doing gymnastics. They got away there but unfortunately Classical music and Piano playing is not gymnastics and i have yet come across a Asian piano player whose recording i would buy for a particular reportoire in any of classical music given that they mass produce pianists almost like mass produce cheap pianos! ;D  ;D

Offline iheartpiano

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Re: Video:Chopin Ballade No.1
«Reply #13 on: September 13, 2008, 01:06:57 AM »
I think she plays beautifully, although I do agree it looks to be a bit difficult for her.  She's amazing though.

this reminds me of the 2008 beijeing olympics and the "new born" chinese kids doing gymnastics. They got away there but unfortunately Classical music and Piano playing is not gymnastics and i have yet come across a Asian piano player whose recording i would buy for a particular reportoire in any of classical music given that they mass produce pianists almost like mass produce cheap pianos! ;D  ;D

Contrary to popular belief, "Asian piano players" aren't "mass produced" and many of us are NOT forced into playing.  I know I wasn't.  In fact, my father did not want me to play and bitched every time he had to take me orchestra rehearsal. 

Perhaps this young lady heard this piece and had an aching desire to play it.  I know it's hard to believe, but we just like any other race and human being play simply because we love music just as much as the rest of you do.

And not real clear on how this reminds you of the Beijing Olympics.   ::)  Come on now, let's keep race the hell out of this.

Offline kelly_kelly

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Re: Video:Chopin Ballade No.1
«Reply #14 on: September 13, 2008, 01:51:29 PM »
I completely agree with iheartpiano. I think it's clear that Rachel loves music, and even if the piece is beyond her, I see no reason why she shouldn't learn it (though I don't think she should try to perform it). In a few years I'm sure she'll play it very well. In the meantime, let her explore.

this reminds me of the 2008 beijeing olympics and the "new born" chinese kids doing gymnastics. They got away there but unfortunately Classical music and Piano playing is not gymnastics and i have yet come across a Asian piano player whose recording i would buy for a particular reportoire in any of classical music given that they mass produce pianists almost like mass produce cheap pianos! ;D  ;D

What a bad-spirited, racist comment.
It all happens on Discworld, where greed and ignorance influence human behavior... and perfectly ordinary people occasionally act like raving idiots.

A world, in short, totally unlike our own.

Offline thierry13

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Re: Video:Chopin Ballade No.1
«Reply #15 on: September 16, 2008, 02:31:26 AM »
What a bad-spirited, racist comment.

Wich is unfortunately too true (it's of course a generalisation, but still ...)