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Master Class with Leon Fleisher: The Late Schubert Sonatas

Filmed during a Professional Training Workshop in New York, Franz Schubert’s late piano sonatas come to life in this performance guide that includes video clips, written commentary, and an animated score, allowing the user to simultaneously watch Mr. Fleisher teach from the keyboard and study the notated music. Select any combination of 24 separate video clips from six categories to build your own tailor-made video master class from a range of topics. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Who is the best Beethoven Sonata Interpreter?  (Read 70225 times)
8_octaves
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« Reply #100 on: April 07, 2015, 08:09:30 AM »


BONUS: I feel that Glenn Gould's Beethoven is inspired.  Rough around the edges, spiritual, adventurous, and intellectually stimulating.  His playing of the third movement of the Moonlight Sonata is, I feel, the best version out there.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UBMqvuAYHSE

And as far as Schiff's lectures are relevant: In his talking about the "moonlight-sonata" he refers on "Beethoven's piano" at that time: But it wasn't the broadwood, then, as Schiff seemed to be of the opinion, but since the moonlight was from 1801 or 1802, it was an older one. The broadwood Beethoven got later.

Furthermore:

Maybe you didn't know, but:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0WhOhUbZLI

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=iLSTzg_cWoE

That's my FAVORURITE! Listen to the playing of the "octave - glissandi", ( the "octave-glissandi", which don't appear in sources, but e.g. only in my Schott-single-edition). Cziffra shows how it works using another approach ( at 8:20 , of mmt 3) - which I like very much !!!!

_____

Furthermore: Gulda (Hammerklavier, Fugue ), Petri (Hammerklavier ), and others.

 Grin cordially, 8_octaves!

PS.: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oAgT79Ea7j0
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"Never be afraid to play before an artist.
The artist listens for that which is well done,
the person who knows nothing listens for the faults." (T. Carreño, quoting her 2nd teacher, Gottschalk.)
bronnestam
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« Reply #101 on: April 07, 2015, 09:34:42 AM »

https://vimeo.com/123965934

Oh, I still count this one. Hauntingly beautiful.  Shocked
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stevensk
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« Reply #102 on: April 17, 2015, 02:54:55 PM »

I dont like this kind of threds, but ok. HJ Lim is my favorite!


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sFcrTycJlD0

Its beautiful, its fresh and impressive. Of course, she plays all of the sonatas ..whithout sheets
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kevonthegreatpianist
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« Reply #103 on: June 05, 2015, 03:27:17 AM »

BAREBOIM

He's god. He's the god.
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I made an account and hadn't used it in a year. Welcome back, kevon.
michael_sayers
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« Reply #104 on: June 05, 2015, 10:03:13 AM »

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=t6gHexGHjOo

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YwP4KYFdzBA

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0U2HuwzzLS4

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=rSi04AzfVKo#t=02m36s


Mvh,
Michael
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perfect_pitch
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« Reply #105 on: June 05, 2015, 10:13:33 AM »

BAREBOIM

You mean BARENBOIM???
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j_menz
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« Reply #106 on: June 05, 2015, 12:24:42 PM »

You mean BARENBOIM???

Nope. Bareboim is his nudist cousin.
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"What the world needs is more geniuses with humility. There are so few of us left" -- Oscar Levant
visitor
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« Reply #107 on: June 06, 2015, 10:49:47 AM »

Nope. Bareboim is his nudist cousin.
And then there's the hairy step brother
Bear Boim
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blackonwhite
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« Reply #108 on: June 08, 2015, 11:36:55 PM »

My favorite is Mr.Glenn Gould of course
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The piano a string instrument controlled by means of percussion.
martinrdb
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« Reply #109 on: January 09, 2016, 07:06:50 PM »

I always return to Schnabel for a point of reference and in a bygone era, I do not know whether he recorded the set but what I have heard of Solomon's recordings have been superb.  Brendel and Gilels deserve a mention and today I heard a recording of Annie Fischer playing op110: a very fine overall interpretation.

Of pianists playing today, I have never heard Martha Argerich put a foot wrong with anything that she plays.  It is the sense of overall command of the whole structure that marks out the great interpreters.
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piulento
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« Reply #110 on: January 23, 2016, 05:06:05 PM »

Definitely Arrau. Especially when playing the late ones.
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huaidongxi
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« Reply #111 on: February 25, 2016, 10:36:51 AM »

the noun in question is 'Interpreter', nicht wahr ?  since LvB's creations reach into the metaphysical, into our imagination and fantasies, there should be more than one high priest/priestess, because we each have different souls.

most of the pianists nominated in this thread can be considered demigods of Beethoven interpreters, could not protest against Kempff, Barenboim, Schnabel, Arrau, Richter, Gilels.  and thanks to the participant who shared Tengstrand, really enjoyed his playing.

on the basis of a very limited sample, as this artist was not particularly favored by the big record companies, have to nominate one more exceptional interpreter, Clara Haskil.  there is a transcendent performance from a 1953 recital of Op.111 that is exceptionally revelatory, and another recital recording from 1957 of Op.31 no.3 that is as true to the composer and composition that anyone is likely to encounter. she was revered for her Schubert D.960 sonata, so it's probably a very secure extrapolation from these two Beethoven sonatas, the Schubert, and the Beethoven concerti she was famous for, that it is our loss than more of her sonatas were not recorded.

leb' wohl  (a pity the sonata was 'translated' by the publisher to 'adieux', and unfortunate the name 
     musik lovers.                                   of the Fantasia became popularized as 'mondschein')             
                                                                                                                 
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bronnestam
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« Reply #112 on: February 26, 2016, 12:01:53 PM »

I was the one who shared Tengstrand, thank you for the appreciation.  Grin 

To comment what you say after that, it is always tricky to compare today's pianists, who we may even have heard live, to someone who made a recording some 50 years ago with the recording technique that was available by then. Personally I find it hard to listen to a very old recording with lots of crackling and a blurry sound and find it very enjoyable even though I can still recognize good piano playing when I hear it.


We also have to consider that there is a constant development in musical interpretation, even of the old works, because people are simply different. Today's young pianists have not only grown up with Beethoven, but also with comtemporary music including death metal and hip hop. Sounds and beats that would have made a musician cringe 70 years ago, are considered perfectly normal and even very cool today.

Therefore there is no use asking ourselves "how Beethoven would have played it" and think that is the perfect model. We have to adapt his music to our instruments, our time, our ears. The musical development is neither good nor bad; it's just the way it is. 

On the other hand, many of the modern recordings are heavily edited and digitally post-processed, which may result in an interpretation that actually just exist as a recording ... And I prefer live performances anytime! They are never "flawless", but that is not the point either. I never cry to recordings, no matter how good they are, but I have done so at live recitals.
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