Piano Forum logo
August 20, 2018, 10:51:44 AM *
   Forum Home   Help Search  


Garrick Ohlsson and Chopin´s Complete Works on Hyperion

Garrick Ohlsson was the first American to win first prize in the International Frédéric Chopin Piano Competition in 1970. In recognition of the bicentenary of Chopin’s birthday Mr. Ohlsson just performed at the Chopin Birthday Concerts in Warzaw (watch video of Chopin's Piano Concerto no 1). The English label Hyperion has now re-released his 16-disc set of the complete works of Chopin. Read more >>

Pages: [1]   Go Down
  Print  
Author Topic: Is Chopin Op. 9 No. 2 a reasonable goal after Op. 24 No .15?  (Read 2642 times)
xpjamiexd
PS Silver Member
Jr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 74


« on: November 21, 2008, 09:24:48 PM »

So yes the question's in the title. Any help or advice?
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

piano sheet music of Nocturne
feddera
PS Silver Member
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 141


« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2008, 10:15:21 PM »

You do mean op.28? I've played the prelude, but not the nocturne. I went from this prelude to his nocturne in c#m, without much trouble. So I'd say it's a very reasonable goal.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
antichrist
PS Silver Member
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 165


« Reply #2 on: November 24, 2008, 02:06:03 PM »

9/2 is esaier than 28/15...

but it may be a little boring
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
quantum
PS Gold Member
Sr. Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 5209


« Reply #3 on: November 25, 2008, 04:25:38 AM »

Quite reasonable.  I wouldn't say the nocturne is easier, as it requires different technique than the prelude.  If you haven't done much oom-pah-pah LH passages yet, you will find the coordination of both hands an interesting but attainable challenge. 

Tips: you can't look at both hands at once in many parts because the distance is just too wide to be both in the visual field.  Choose one, and feel your way through the other.   Usually the hand with the jump is the one you want to look at.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

Made a Liszt. Need new Handel's for Soler panel & Alkan foil. Will Faure Stein on the way to pick up Mendels' sohn. Josquin get Wolfgangs Schu with Clara. Gone Chopin, I'll be Bach
xpjamiexd
PS Silver Member
Jr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 74


« Reply #4 on: November 28, 2008, 06:08:30 PM »

Quite reasonable.  I wouldn't say the nocturne is easier, as it requires different technique than the prelude.  If you haven't done much oom-pah-pah LH passages yet, you will find the coordination of both hands an interesting but attainable challenge. 

Tips: you can't look at both hands at once in many parts because the distance is just too wide to be both in the visual field.  Choose one, and feel your way through the other.   Usually the hand with the jump is the one you want to look at.

Thanks for the help and yes I meant Op. 28 Tongue
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
lflp
PS Gold Member
Jr. Member
*****
Offline Offline

Posts: 28


« Reply #5 on: October 24, 2012, 01:39:32 PM »

As a new member of this forum I find fascinated so many people
love the music of Chopin. I have piano for about 1 year and have a
problem as stated in the subject.
I hope someome can help me with what kind of notes I am going to play
in this secund bar (turn or turn inverted).

Greetings
Flemming

Sorry for my english  - my nationality is danish.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged
blazekenny
PS Silver Member
Full Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 158


« Reply #6 on: October 24, 2012, 01:59:34 PM »

¨Well, I have never heard this nocturne played well by students. I think dance forms by Chopin are among his hardest works, It is so hard to find the compromise between the rubatos and the waltz in this nocturne. Sure, It´s one of his shortest and doesnt have a lot of notes, but I would suggest starting with the f minor one, opus 55. If you are a little more mature pianist, the b flat minor one also works well. Dont underestimate the Chopin nocturnes, to play it with a rich sound, it can take as much effort as one scherzo.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

Janáček:Sonata I.X.1905
Smetana:Concert etude g sharp minor op.17
Schumann:Sonata f sharp minor op.11
Mozart:Concerto B flat major no.27 K595
tdawe
PS Silver Member
Jr. Member
***
Offline Offline

Posts: 80


« Reply #7 on: October 25, 2012, 05:34:04 PM »

If you are totally new to Chopin's nocturne the Op.posth. in C minor is a good starting exercise. If you can play Op.28/XV then you should be able to learn it in short order.
Do you find this post useful? Yes / No
Logged

Musicology student & amateur pianist
Currently focusing on:
Shostakovich Op.87, Chopin Op.37, Misc. Bartok
Pages: [1]   Go Up
  Print  


Need more info or help?


Search pianostreet.com - the web's largest resource of information about piano playing:



 
Jump to:  


Most popular classical piano composers:
Powered by MySQL Powered by PHP Powered by SMF 1.1.21 | SMF © 2006-2007, Simple Machines Valid XHTML 1.0! Valid CSS!

o