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Topic: Bartok's music difficult to listen to???  (Read 2816 times)

Spatula

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Bartok's music difficult to listen to???
on: June 18, 2004, 08:17:42 AM
I find that much of Bartok's music is very rhythmic based yet somehow he always puts in "disruptive" chords to jar the music in unexpected ways, like there is no real smooth flow, but a lot of juxtaposition.  I'm somewhat biased because I haven't heard much of his works, but I really find it difficult especially after his PC #1.  

Is pretty much most of his stuff like this?  (ie all straight and wonky chords and rythms?)  I found that the composer that could successfully pull this off and still have a powerful statement is Prokofiev.  I haven't explored every single composers' works (because theres thousands upon thousands of works) including opears etc...immense!

But what are your thoughts?   :D  :P

Offline liszmaninopin

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Re: Bartok's music difficult to listen to???
Reply #1 on: June 18, 2004, 03:21:33 PM
try listening to Bartok's piano concerto #3.  It's much more traditional-one of my favorite concertos.

Offline Baron_Clavier

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Re: Bartok's music difficult to listen to???
Reply #2 on: June 19, 2004, 06:09:47 AM
Or listen to his Divertimenti for strings - Very intense, I always enjoy a good performance of these.

Offline Tash

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Re: Bartok's music difficult to listen to???
Reply #3 on: June 19, 2004, 02:57:39 PM
oh yeah the piano conerto #3 is my fave. as shown by my numerous posts on fave composers and compositions etc. you'll notice that i am a bartok fan. i found that he was easier to listen to after i learnt about him in class. the thing with him is that you really have to listen fully or it'll just be annoying. also love music for strings percussion and celeste and string quartet no.5. i find the way he's structured his compositions fascinating, with the mirror/arch form and whole golden section thing- very interesting
'J'aime presque autant les images que la musique' Debussy

Shagdac

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Re: Bartok's music difficult to listen to???
Reply #4 on: June 19, 2004, 11:03:29 PM
I too, Spatula have felt somewhat the same way. I do not necessarily find it difficult to "listen" to, but rather to interpret or understand. It reminds me of artwork which is referred to as being abstract. Or sculptures made from aluminum. It's just different. I have not heard the Concerto #3, and am looking forward to hearing it. I do enjoy his work, but it is very different than what I am used to hearing. I would like to learn some of his pieces. Can anyone suggest 1 or 2 to start with, that would be the easiest to start with as far as getting the feel for that style of playing?

Thanks,
S :)

Offline Dan

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Re: Bartok's music difficult to listen to???
Reply #5 on: June 30, 2004, 10:05:22 PM
Hello Spatula,

Keep listening ! I disliked Bartok's music when my teacher gave me the first pieces. It sounded so dissonant (I was used to the "tonal"music) but I thought : "how is it possible that Bartok is considered one of the great, am I missing something?" So I kept listening to his 1st violin concerto every day for months. At a certain moment it was as if I became enlightened, I suddenly understood his music and was totally shaken by the breathtaking, haunting beauty of this piece. His melodies seem illogical at first hearing but when you get "used"to them they are so wonderfull ! This is true for all of his works. Via Bartok's music I started listening to (and playing) other "modern music" between 1900 and 2000 and got rid of my prejudice against modern music. BTW go and see the horror film "the Shining"(with Jack Nicholson) and enjoy the Music for Strings and Celesta by Bartok playing on the background which makes the film even more haunting...
I can recommend the 1st violin concerto to listen to first, it's a late romantic, lyrical composition.
Cheers,
Dan    
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