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“Play Me, I’m Yours” – Street Pianos

Artist Luke Jerram has put together street pianos installations in various cities. The initiative comes as a reaction of a creative individual to the general rule, prohibiting anyone to play music in public places without special arrangement – no matter how skilful you are at playing your piano or how popular your music is with the audience. Read more >>

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Author Topic: How long should it take to master the first Invention?  (Read 9146 times)
jcabraham
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« on: August 30, 2009, 02:13:36 PM »

I've been playing off and on for years. There are a number of pieces I have learned, on the order of "Anna Magdalena Notebook", Mozart minuets, etc. I started to learn the first Invention, but it seems like it's taking forever. I'm not having any problem with technique -- the hand independence problems were overcome the first week. I'd say it's more to do with keeping ironclad fingering, and losing my place. I haven't been able to practice a lot each day, maybe 30-45 minutes, but still, it's been more than a month, and I'm still a couple of weeks away, I'd say. Is this piece simply too hard for me? I hope not, because I like it more than anything I've played yet. Contrapuntal music is really fun!

Jim
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piano sheet music of Invention
communist
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« Reply #1 on: August 30, 2009, 03:23:25 PM »

Maybe you should put it aside a little while. I think I learned it when I was playing slightly harder pieces than what you said you played. So wait a little while and do scales.

Good luck!
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iroveashe
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« Reply #2 on: August 30, 2009, 04:35:14 PM »

I don't think it's too hard for you, the main difficulty in this type of pieces is when you start them hands together, once you get the coordinates it's pretty easy. Something that helps me a lot with Bach Inventions, especially coordination and speed is changing rhythms, for example if you have:
http://hosted.drpic.com/AGZ9SWV6TC

You play:
http://hosted.drpic.com/5T6BWAYVOE

That works for me when I already have the sections memorized.


Check this 2 threads to see if they help:

http://www.pianostreet.com/smf/index.php/topic,2714.msg23310.html#msg23310

http://www.pianostreet.com/smf/index.php/topic,7664.msg77057.html#msg77057
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"By concentrating on precision, one arrives at technique, but by concentrating on technique one does not arrive at precision."
Bruno Walter
jcabraham
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« Reply #3 on: August 30, 2009, 09:30:36 PM »

I don't think it's too hard for you, the main difficulty in this type of pieces is when you start them hands together, once you get the coordinates it's pretty easy. Something that helps me a lot with Bach Inventions, especially coordination and speed is changing rhythms, for example if you have:
http://hosted.drpic.com/AGZ9SWV6TC

You play:
http://hosted.drpic.com/5T6BWAYVOE

That works for me when I already have the sections memorized.

Funny, my teacher just told me the exact same thing an hour ago. Great minds....
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bestpianosoftware
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« Reply #4 on: September 07, 2009, 09:08:49 PM »

You have achieved more than you can give yourself credit for.  You have also worked harder than the some of us.  So give yourself a pat on the back.  Good job.  Wink
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theodore
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« Reply #5 on: September 16, 2009, 02:52:01 PM »

A  practical device keeping  ones place is to  fold a stiff piece of cardboard, making it into a music stand. Then place it or tape it very very close and just above the keys.  You will then see both your fingers and the music score at a glance. It will also give you an greater awareness of the physical fingering as you will see both your penciled markings and your fingers at the same time.
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go12_3
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« Reply #6 on: September 17, 2009, 06:46:56 PM »

Simple answer:  As long as you want it to   Cool
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Today is the day I live and love,Tomorrow is day of hope and promises...
soitainly
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« Reply #7 on: September 17, 2009, 06:54:18 PM »

 I think a lot of people have problems with Bach. It is hard music to memorize. I am primarily a guitarist and we speak of memory lapses Bach always is part of the conversation. You say your problems aren't physical so I would suggest analysing the music as deeply as you can. If you can name all the harmonies/chords and think of self verbal ques it might be easier to keep track of where you are and are heading. I am struggling with Bach too, but I like the music too much to just outright give up.
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lukyfela1
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« Reply #8 on: May 26, 2010, 11:12:44 PM »

in response: you need to spend at least an hour in Memorization techniques ...

Fingering is fingering.  Look at different editions for suggestions. Other than that place your hand over the area of the notes and develop your own fingering. make notations, and stick to it. Of course it must be comfortable for you.

Watch the pro's as they play and you will find that their fingering is centered on the center of each phrase.  It took me a long time to realize that., but once I did, I was able to sight read and memorize a lot quicker.
I think it took me a week to do the # 1.  and yes, I do play the 2 part inventions all the way through, and then the 3 part.
a hint, if you are having problems.  Leave it, do something else, and then go back to it.
Our subconscious mind does work whether we're asleep or awake...give it some time to react and help you do what you want. hope this helps.,

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