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Chopin Preludes – New Urtext Sheet Music

Written partly during Chopin’s catastrophic wintertime stay on Majorca, the 24 Preludes, opus 28, are some of the composer’s most mysterious works. Schumann said of them: “They are sketches, beginnings of études, or, so to speak, ruins, individual eagle pinions, all disorder and wild confusions.” Read more >>

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Author Topic: Piano arrangment of Carl Orff's Carmina Burana  (Read 10518 times)
pianoplayjl
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« on: February 16, 2012, 05:55:02 AM »

Anyone got the sheet music for it? preferably around 7-8th grade standard.

JL
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quantum
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« Reply #1 on: February 16, 2012, 11:20:28 AM »

Not sure about the copyright status of it.  There is a two piano version done by Wilhelm Killmayer in 1956 and authorized by Orff.  

I've performed the whole thing, and would say the piano parts are RCM 10 - ARCT in difficulty.  

Are you looking for all movements or selected ones?  1st movement O Fortuna is the one that is well known.  
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Made a Liszt. Need new Handel's for Soler panel & Alkan foil. Will Faure Stein on the way to pick up Mendels' sohn. Josquin get Wolfgangs Schu with Clara. Gone Chopin, I'll be Bach
pianoplayjl
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« Reply #2 on: February 16, 2012, 11:37:25 AM »

Exactly, I was looking for O fortuna. I don't mind 2 pianos version. Does that also mean a piano duet? I could do with one too.

But if you have a solo piano version of Fortuna, I would be very grateful. If it were around 7-8th grade standard, even better. But a 2 pianos version is Ok.

JL
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49410enrique
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« Reply #3 on: February 16, 2012, 01:13:53 PM »

i have the solo transciption of the entire thing but the excerpt you're looking for is surely in there among the rest of the work, i dn't know about the grade but i'll upload it to my media fire and shoot it to you so you can look at it if you decide to buy it you can preview it to make sure it is around the right grade. from the initial looks of it it's not that bad. really really nice good solo writing for a choral plus orch to piano transcription.

its by chumachenco as heard on  this album if you're interested in buying a recording of it
http://www.classicsonline.com/catalogue/product.aspx?pid=257753 you can click into it and it will play a few seconds of each section so you can preview the sounds

sheets
http://www.sheetmusicplus.com/title/Carmina-Burana/1203166

10% off coupon code good till april 3 2012
 "Welcome10percent"

publisher released preview images below (not mine as in these shouldbn't violate copyright rules since they put these out in their marketing)




 



* 1203166.jpg (34 KB, 450x590 - viewed 651 times.)

* 1203166_01.jpg (62.68 KB, 450x625 - viewed 2547 times.)

* 1203166_02.jpg (54.98 KB, 449x608 - viewed 1401 times.)

* 1203166_03.jpg (53.68 KB, 449x606 - viewed 1160 times.)
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quantum
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« Reply #4 on: February 16, 2012, 05:05:57 PM »

Those samples look pretty faithful to the original. 
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Made a Liszt. Need new Handel's for Soler panel & Alkan foil. Will Faure Stein on the way to pick up Mendels' sohn. Josquin get Wolfgangs Schu with Clara. Gone Chopin, I'll be Bach
kuska
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« Reply #5 on: April 15, 2017, 07:25:04 PM »

How would you rate the grade of Chucamenco version? It looks quite advanced.
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phillip21
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« Reply #6 on: April 15, 2017, 08:52:06 PM »

I have that arrangement, and I think it is extremely difficult and needs large hands.  If I remember rightly it also requires the very low notes that are only available on high-end concert instruments
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kuska
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« Reply #7 on: April 15, 2017, 10:00:17 PM »

yeah, thanks, that's what I was afraid of Wink Anyway, good to have something to look forward to  Grin
Found one recorded by P. Barton

Love it.
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musikalischer_wirbelwind_280
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« Reply #8 on: April 18, 2017, 01:49:13 AM »

Man, I both hate and love that arrangement!!

I hate it because it often does require some pretty large hand spans. But to be fair, that's a complaint I could make of dozens more pieces; it's truly sad and disappointing, albeit understandable, that no piano firm, at least to my knowledge, has ever made pianos with keyboards especially designed to let people with small hands play 9ths and 10ths at least...

Back to the Chumachenco arrangement, I love it because it's truly faithful to the original work and, in my most humble opinion Cool, does full justice to it! Like Wagner is supposed to have said of Liszt's piano solo arrangement of his "Tannhäuser" Overture, it's "like a wonderful dream come true".  Smiley
And while most of it (including the "O Fortuna", of course) is very difficult to play unless you possess a formidable technique, there's still a few sections that are relatively easy and lots of fun, too, like "Fortune plango vulnera", "Omnia sol temperat", "Chramer, gip die varwe mir", "Chume, chum, geselle min", "Amor volat undique" and "In trutina mentis dubia", one of my favorites.

Very best,
M.W.
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kuska
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« Reply #9 on: April 18, 2017, 09:39:29 AM »

And while most of it (including the "O Fortuna", of course) is very difficult to play unless you possess a formidable technique, there's still a few sections that are relatively easy and lots of fun, too, like "Fortune plango vulnera", "Omnia sol temperat", "Chramer, gip die varwe mir", "Chume, chum, geselle min", "Amor volat undique" and "In trutina mentis dubia", one of my favorites.

Thanks for the insight. Precious. I've already purchased the set. It should take a couple of days to ship it from UK but hopefully, should be here by next Wednesday. I haven't even dreamt that I'd be able to play this right now (even in the past I think the most advanced piece I was learning was Beethoven's Pathetique and it was far from completed) but I'd definitely try to sort out some of the excerpts anyway. But now you gave me hope that there're some easier pieces in the set as well  Cool
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musikalischer_wirbelwind_280
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« Reply #10 on: April 18, 2017, 05:58:11 PM »

My pleasure. Wink You can believe me when I tell you you won't regret spending those bucks on this arrangement, it's definitely worth it.

When I first found out about it, I was only looking for a piano solo arrangement of the "O fortuna", not because it was the only section I cared about, since as you know, that entire work is a gold mine, but because I just didn't think it possible that anyone had actually taken the time to arrange the whole thing for piano, solo or otherwise. But there you go!

I think I might have made a bit of a blunder including the "Fortune plango vulnera" among those relatively easy sections of the work, because the second half of it is pretty demanding, both because of those big jumps involving chords and octaves, as well as the tempo, but it's true I found the first half easy enough, on the other hand (pun most definitely intended!). The others I mentioned are definitely easier, and like I said, they're still lots of fun, too!

I also appreciate the fact that, not infrequently, Chumachenco writes down the name of the particular instrument that you're trying to evoke in certain passages, a little like Liszt did with his transcriptions of the 9 Beethoven symphonies, so that, just to name a couple of examples, you get the annotation "quasi marimba" at the very beginning of the exquisite "Veris leta facies" and a somewhat funny "legato, quasi Soprano" ,at the beginning of the famous (...or infamous?) "Dulcissime".  Cool

Hope you get your hands on it real soon! And cheers for that vid, by the way, I had never watched that one, it's a pretty good rendering of the "O fortuna"! Here's the first part of the three that make up Chumachenco's own recording of the whole work, if you're interested:
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