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Pianostreet calculus group (Read 6608 times)

Offline rachmaninoff_forever

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Pianostreet calculus group
« on: October 10, 2012, 02:05:30 AM »
Okay so...  This is how it is...

I noticed that there are a few people who are taking some form of calculus in here, and some of us, I need help. 

So I thought of creating this group!  Because some of us, I are too afraid to approach our teachers.

And for those of you in geometry or trig, feel free to post your questions here as well.
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Offline faulty_damper

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #1 on: October 10, 2012, 06:53:04 AM »
Dude, just ask your teacher.  It's not gay to ask a teacher for help.  Sheesh! ::)  Grow up!

Offline rachmaninoff_forever

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #2 on: October 10, 2012, 11:28:50 AM »
Dude, just ask your teacher.  It's not gay to ask a teacher for help.  Sheesh! ::)  Grow up!


What the freaking heck are you talking about?!
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Offline faulty_damper

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #3 on: October 10, 2012, 03:23:01 PM »
Quote
Because some of us, I are too afraid to approach our teachers.

Go on, grasshopper, ask! ;D

Offline lloyd_cdb

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #4 on: October 10, 2012, 04:00:17 PM »
I tutor calc. and stats.  If you need help feel free to message me or just post here, I'll try to keep an eye on this.
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Offline fftransform

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #5 on: October 10, 2012, 07:55:16 PM »

Offline rachmaninoff_forever

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #6 on: October 11, 2012, 01:33:39 AM »
I tutor calc. and stats.  If you need help feel free to message me or just post here,

Favorite three people on piano street:

1.  lloyd_cdb
2.  J Menz
3.  Everyone else


No but thank freaking god!  I freaking have a D in that class!  My highest test grade was a freaking 75%  and on my last test, my teacher wrote, "see me please".

Oh no...  When a teachers writes, "see me please", you know she's preparing you form something!  Everyone in the class is waay smarter than me so if I ask her questions, she's probably gonna flame me soo hard!  This is PRECISELY the reason why I don't like talking to honors or AP teachers. 

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Offline ajspiano

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #7 on: October 11, 2012, 01:36:59 AM »
Favorite three people on piano street:

1.  lloyd_cdb
2.  J Menz
3.  Everyone else


What?! if you're going to assert that we are the same person you have to rate us (me) equally. I'm hurt.

On topic though, if you ask your teacher for help, and they fail to do so or give you crap you can probably have them severely reprimanded if you make an appropriate complaint to the right person..   assuming you are not a turd in class.

Personally I was a turd to my maths teacher, she hated me - and it was mutual.

Offline rachmaninoff_forever

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #8 on: October 11, 2012, 01:43:00 AM »
What?! if you're going to assert that we are the same person you have to rate us (me) equally. I'm hurt.


I think that J Menz is the original personality. 

Besides, I like that one better.
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Offline ajspiano

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #9 on: October 11, 2012, 01:47:06 AM »


I think that J Menz is the original personality. 

Besides, I like that one better.


He is nicer than me...  however...


Name:   j_menz
Posts:   2064 (7.759 per day)
Position:   PS Silver Member
Date Registered:   January 19, 2012, 12:21:22 AM

Name:   ajspiano
Posts:   1705 (5.059 per day)
Position:   PS Gold Member
Date Registered:   November 09, 2011, 12:25:27 AM

..now what are you going to do to support your pathetic arguement?

Offline rachmaninoff_forever

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #10 on: October 11, 2012, 01:53:23 AM »

Name:   j_menz
Posts:   2064 (7.759 per day)
Position:   PS Silver Member
Date Registered:   January 19, 2012, 12:21:22 AM

Name:   ajspiano
Posts:   1705 (5.059 per day)
Position:   PS Gold Member
Date Registered:   November 09, 2011, 12:25:27 AM

..now what are you going to do to support your pathetic arguement?

Hmmmmmm...  There's only one explanation for this!


J Menz's personality split before November 9, 2011, and the second personality just made the account before the first one!

 8)
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Offline j_menz

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #11 on: October 11, 2012, 02:42:50 AM »
My feelings are that if one can't tell the difference between 1 and 2, one's maths problems are more fundamental than the odd issue with AP Calculus.  ::)

Oh, and see your teacher and ask the questions you want. It's their job, and you may well be surprised how helpful they are. 
"What the world needs is more geniuses with humility. There are so few of us left" -- Oscar Levant

Offline rachmaninoff_forever

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #12 on: October 11, 2012, 03:24:51 AM »

Oh, and see your teacher and ask the questions you want. It's their job, and you may well be surprised how helpful they are. 

Nah dude, those guys are scary.
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Offline j_menz

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #13 on: October 11, 2012, 03:29:13 AM »
Nah dude, those guys are scary.

No, they're not. They are teachers, who want you to learn and believe they can help you do that.

They will be scary if you don't let them know that you have not understood something and just keep turning in wrong answers. They will be scary if you just don't try. 

They won't be scary if you ask for their help.

"What the world needs is more geniuses with humility. There are so few of us left" -- Oscar Levant

Offline rachmaninoff_forever

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #14 on: October 11, 2012, 03:41:27 AM »
No, they're not. They are teachers, who want you to learn and believe they can help you do that.

They will be scary if you don't let them know that you have not understood something and just keep turning in wrong answers. They will be scary if you just don't try.  

They won't be scary if you ask for their help.



Noooooooooooooo you don't understand!  They're sooooo freaking scary!

Regular teachers are okay.  Honors and AP teachers are like freaking monsters!
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Offline werq34ac

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #15 on: October 11, 2012, 03:41:37 AM »
I mean I'm willing to help out but wouldn't calcchat.com be a better place to find help? All of the kids in our class use calcchat. Perhaps a little too much..
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Offline rachmaninoff_forever

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #16 on: October 11, 2012, 03:45:59 AM »
I mean I'm willing to help out but wouldn't calcchat.com be a better place to find help? All of the kids in our class use calcchat. Perhaps a little too much..

Never herd of it.
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Offline j_menz

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #17 on: October 11, 2012, 04:08:10 AM »
Noooooooooooooo you don't understand!  They're sooooo freaking scary!

Regular teachers are okay.  Honors and AP teachers are like freaking monsters!

I suspect I have had more, and more advanced, teachers than you, so I do not accept that I do not understand.

More advanced teachers are used to more advanced students, and advanced students ask if they do not understand something. In many ways, it is indeed how they became advanced students.
"What the world needs is more geniuses with humility. There are so few of us left" -- Oscar Levant

Offline rachmaninoff_forever

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #18 on: October 11, 2012, 04:18:25 AM »
I suspect I have had more, and more advanced, teachers than you, so I do not accept that I do not understand.

More advanced teachers are used to more advanced students, and advanced students ask if they do not understand something. In many ways, it is indeed how they became advanced students.

I don't like those teachers because I think they're really mean and if you don't understand something they'll get mad at you if they think it's basic.

I've known this from personal experience throughout my high school career.  So I've learned to avoid them.

And even in class, if the teacher asks the student body something, I don't say a word!  Because that one time you're wrong you feel like everyone's flaming you in their heads.  
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Offline j_menz

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #19 on: October 11, 2012, 04:26:29 AM »
I think they're really mean and if you don't understand something they'll get mad at you if it's like really basic.

You mean as in something you really should have asked about earlier, but didn't? And so they have been wasting their time for the past however long assuming you knew this and teaching you new stuff that is based on that assumption? As in they have effectively wasted the whole however long because you didn't tell them?

Quelle surprise that they might be a bit miffed.  ::)
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Offline ajspiano

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #20 on: October 11, 2012, 05:06:10 AM »
I can relate to the "mean teacher" experience (perhaps slightly different to rach's though)..  personally I had more than one absolute prick of a teacher during highschool. Vindictive, bullying people. I was picked on by teachers because I didn't conform to the typical student mould.

Many of my classes were a colossal waste of my time because teachers were unwilling or unable to handle students as individuals rather than as an entire class, most evidently in maths.

..that doesn't seem likely in this case though.

Offline faulty_damper

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #21 on: October 11, 2012, 07:08:28 AM »
I don't like those teachers because I think they're really mean and if you don't understand something they'll get mad at you if they think it's basic.

I've known this from personal experience throughout my high school career.  So I've learned to avoid them.

And even in class, if the teacher asks the student body something, I don't say a word!  Because that one time you're wrong you feel like everyone's flaming you in their heads.  

Avoidance is a natural response to a negative stimuli.  However, in schooling, it's absolutely critical that you avoid your avoidance response.  Otherwise, you'll be on an online piano forum asking for help. ;)

What you MUST LEARN is self-advocacy.  This is the most important life skill in American culture.  This means that you speak up for yourself, even against those you don't like or who don't like you.  If you do this, you'll gain the respect of the person and more importantly, you'll respect yourself.

This is something I very recently realized that I didn't have.  All of my life, my parents raised me to "listen to the teacher" and "don't talk back".  This was, and still is, very bad advice in the United States.  But I don't blame my parents because they weren't born here.  However, now that I am aware of it, it is my responsibility to correct this deficit.

I'm not young anymore.  I can't use excuses that would be accepted by others if I were a teenager.  So I must change my behavior even though I am uncomfortable and feel anxious about it.  This is something you must learn to do.  You'll regret it if you don't.

Gook Lucd! 8)


Offline rachmaninoff_forever

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #22 on: October 11, 2012, 12:06:57 PM »
You mean as in something you really should have asked about earlier, but didn't?

No.  >:(
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Offline starlady

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #23 on: October 11, 2012, 01:33:34 PM »

Rach4, do not be afraid of math teachers.  They are just like piano teachers: they have the JOB of teaching you, and they want to do that job, and with some students they have try different approaches before they find the one that works.   
You know how often someone talks in this forum about some problem with their piano teacher?  Then you know that the advice is always: confront! Talk it out with the scary teacher and you'll see they're not really that scary!!  From your internet behaviour I don't think you are a very shy person (and that's leaving your stalking of Valentina Lista out of it), so go for it. 

And if you really panic, remember that she/he gets paid to teach you.  Really.

--s.

Offline werq34ac

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #24 on: October 11, 2012, 11:19:09 PM »
Calcchat is really good. Try it.
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Offline rachmaninoff_forever

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #25 on: October 12, 2012, 01:50:25 AM »
Let f be the function defined by f(x) = sin^2x - sinx for x is between 0 and 3pi/2


a.  find the x intercepts of f

b.  write the equation of any horizontal tangents of f

c.  find the intervals on which f is incereasing

d.  sketch an accurate graph of f'(x) and explain how that graph can help you answer (c).
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Offline faulty_damper

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #26 on: October 12, 2012, 02:00:18 AM »
I can't answer the problem because I never took calculus but when you figure it out, be sure to practice it by repeating the steps.  It's just like piano practice.  It should be memorized.  Then you can simply apply it to other problems.

Offline chopin2015

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #27 on: October 12, 2012, 02:04:13 AM »
physics=calculus+trig

physics>calculus
physics>trig

"Beethoven wrote in three flats a lot. That's because he moved twice."

Offline rachmaninoff_forever

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #28 on: October 12, 2012, 02:09:42 AM »
I'm not going to bed until I finish this.


Okay so for a, the x intercepts are at where X equals 0, pi, and pi/2.
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Offline chopin2015

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #29 on: October 12, 2012, 02:14:09 AM »
Email people, kind sir. I am probably the youngest here, but I have had a couple of years of audio school, physics, electronics, acoustics, etc. but the guy who said he's a tutor in calc sounds legitimate. Good luck!
"Beethoven wrote in three flats a lot. That's because he moved twice."

Offline ajspiano

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #30 on: October 12, 2012, 02:17:38 AM »
but the guy who said he's a tutor in calc sounds legitimate.

I think fftransform's actual profession is mathematician..   I vaguely remember him saying that once, and he certainly used some fairly technical maths terminology to have a crack at me in a thread a few months back..

Offline rachmaninoff_forever

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #31 on: October 12, 2012, 02:21:07 AM »
OOOOOOOOOOOH dude I got it!  It took me 35 minutes, but that's okay!  I'm going to send him a personal message now.
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Offline chopin2015

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #32 on: October 12, 2012, 02:26:18 AM »
I think fftransform's actual profession is mathematician..   I vaguely remember him saying that once, and he certainly used some fairly technical maths terminology to have a crack at me in a thread a few months back..

indeed, quite resourceful!

Have fun, Rach_forevs
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Offline outin

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #33 on: October 12, 2012, 05:23:39 AM »
Rach:

If it's any consolation, 25 years ago I could have done that in a heatbeat. Now? All gone, hardly know what you are talking about. But still I am doing pretty well in my professional life. The math problems I encounter are on the level of counting percentage and understanding basic statistical functions.

So just stuck with it now, ask for help, get proper grades and then forget about it, learn to do something you enjoy and that comes to you easier and be happy with the rest of your life  :D

Offline lloyd_cdb

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #34 on: October 12, 2012, 03:56:55 PM »
Let f be the function defined by f(x) = sin^2x - sinx for x is between 0 and 3pi/2


a.  find the x intercepts of f

b.  write the equation of any horizontal tangents of f

c.  find the intervals on which f is incereasing

d.  sketch an accurate graph of f'(x) and explain how that graph can help you answer (c).

not sure if you've gotten the rest of it yet:

b) horizontal tangents exist where the derivative of the equation is equal to zero.

f(x) = sin(x)^2 - sin(x)
f'(x) = sin(2x) - cos(x)

solve for f'(x) = 0

sin(2x) - cos(x) = 0
sin(2x) = cos(x):      since sin (2x) = 2sin(x)cos(x),

2sin(x)cos(x) - cos(x) = 0
cos(x)[2sin(x) - 1] = 0

so cos(x) = 0, and/or 2sin(x) - 1 = 0, between 0 and 3pi/2

pi/2, 3pi/2 ............. pi/6, 5pi/6

c) The line is increasing at points in which f'(x) > 0. I'm not sure if there is a better way to do this, but since the tangential lines are zero at (pi/6, pi/2, 5pi/6, 3pi/2), just pick an arbitrary number between each of these intervals (as well as the 0 to pi/6 interval). If the result is positive, that is an increasing interval.

d) every x intercept of f'(x) is a horizontal tangent of the original equation which you found in b).  f'(x) represents the rate of change of the original equation, so anywhere the graph of f'(x) is above y=0 the original function is increasing.
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Offline werq34ac

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #35 on: October 14, 2012, 03:38:23 PM »
indeed, quite resourceful!

Have fun, Rach_forevs

Didn't you say you were in college? How old are you?

not sure if you've gotten the rest of it yet:

b) horizontal tangents exist where the derivative of the equation is equal to zero.

f(x) = sin(x)^2 - sin(x)
f'(x) = sin(2x) - cos(x)

solve for f'(x) = 0

sin(2x) - cos(x) = 0
sin(2x) = cos(x):      since sin (2x) = 2sin(x)cos(x),

2sin(x)cos(x) - cos(x) = 0
cos(x)[2sin(x) - 1] = 0

so cos(x) = 0, and/or 2sin(x) - 1 = 0, between 0 and 3pi/2

pi/2, 3pi/2 ............. pi/6, 5pi/6

c) The line is increasing at points in which f'(x) > 0. I'm not sure if there is a better way to do this, but since the tangential lines are zero at (pi/6, pi/2, 5pi/6, 3pi/2), just pick an arbitrary number between each of these intervals (as well as the 0 to pi/6 interval). If the result is positive, that is an increasing interval.

d) every x intercept of f'(x) is a horizontal tangent of the original equation which you found in b).  f'(x) represents the rate of change of the original equation, so anywhere the graph of f'(x) is above y=0 the original function is increasing.

I think the derivative is wrong. Wouldn't it be f'(x)=2sinxcosx-cosx? Either way, you need a cosx somewhere in that first term.
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Offline rachmaninoff_forever

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #36 on: October 14, 2012, 03:47:01 PM »
Didn't you say you were in college? How old are you?

I think the derivative is wrong. Wouldn't it be f'(x)=2sinxcosx-cosx?

You can simplify it.  
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Offline rachmaninoff_forever

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #37 on: October 14, 2012, 03:47:58 PM »
not sure if you've gotten the rest of it yet:

b) horizontal tangents exist where the derivative of the equation is equal to zero.

f(x) = sin(x)^2 - sin(x)
f'(x) = sin(2x) - cos(x)

solve for f'(x) = 0

sin(2x) - cos(x) = 0
sin(2x) = cos(x):      since sin (2x) = 2sin(x)cos(x),

2sin(x)cos(x) - cos(x) = 0
cos(x)[2sin(x) - 1] = 0

so cos(x) = 0, and/or 2sin(x) - 1 = 0, between 0 and 3pi/2

pi/2, 3pi/2 ............. pi/6, 5pi/6

c) The line is increasing at points in which f'(x) > 0. I'm not sure if there is a better way to do this, but since the tangential lines are zero at (pi/6, pi/2, 5pi/6, 3pi/2), just pick an arbitrary number between each of these intervals (as well as the 0 to pi/6 interval). If the result is positive, that is an increasing interval.

d) every x intercept of f'(x) is a horizontal tangent of the original equation which you found in b).  f'(x) represents the rate of change of the original equation, so anywhere the graph of f'(x) is above y=0 the original function is increasing.

I got that but it took me a freaking hour...
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Offline chadbrochill17

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #38 on: October 14, 2012, 04:43:30 PM »
Oh how I love Calculus. Once you get the hang of it, it makes math so much more awesome. I'm a junior in college now and I have used calculus in all my physics and I took up to differential equations in math. I know this point was already pressed earlier, but TALK TO YOUR TEACHER. You don't understand how much of a difference it makes. Once you get over that hurdle as early as you can, you will be able to talk to all of your teachers with confidence. And trust me, you also want to be able to do this for your college professors.

But I like this thread idea. I think if anyone, not just Rach, has math issues we should get them to come here.

Offline rachmaninoff_forever

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #39 on: October 14, 2012, 05:02:07 PM »
TALK TO YOUR TEACHER

I have a test on implicit differentiation and chain rule tomorrow. 

If I do well on it, then I won't consult my teacher.  However if I bomb it, then maybe I'll send a proxy to talk to her.
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Offline faulty_damper

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #40 on: October 14, 2012, 06:07:08 PM »
Just to back Rach4 on why he's scared of talking to his teacher, I've had negative experiences with talking to teachers. 

I once spoke to a Japanese teacher about my test (59%) only to have her make me cry.  She communicated (but didn't say explicitly) to get the hell out of her office, I'm' stupid, and I'm wasting her time.  I did all I could not to burst into tears while sitting in the chair as she was staring me down.  A short while later, as I was driving to work, I told my co-worker what happened and my eyes exploded. :'(

Some people just shouldn't be teachers.

Offline rachmaninoff_forever

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #41 on: October 14, 2012, 07:13:20 PM »
Just to back Rach4 on why he's scared of talking to his teacher, I've had negative experiences with talking to teachers. 

I once spoke to a Japanese teacher about my test (59%) only to have her make me cry.  She communicated (but didn't say explicitly) to get the hell out of her office, I'm' stupid, and I'm wasting her time.  I did all I could not to burst into tears while sitting in the chair as she was staring me down.  A short while later, as I was driving to work, I told my co-worker what happened and my eyes exploded. :'(

Some people just shouldn't be teachers.

There there... *pats on back* it's okay now...

Hey, somebody get him a tissue!

No but yeah, basically the same thing happened last year with my math teacher!  The first day of school he tried to kick me out of class because he thought I was stupid.  He was like, 'Hey kid, you're not good enough.  Drop out of CATA and take something else.  What the freaking heck?!  I felt sooooooo salty!!!  He did that in front of everyone too what the heck?!  Then after that he gave a speech about how he thinks everyone is sufficient enough to be in my class!  I was sooo freaking mad!!!!!


No but yeah, you guys don't understand.  Seeing these teachers are scary.






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Offline faulty_damper

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #42 on: October 15, 2012, 01:57:32 AM »
That was the third, and last, time I went to see her in her office and it was the last time I ever spoke to her about anything.  She had her doctorate in pedagogy! :o  And speaking as a teacher, she couldn't teach.  The sad thing was that she was well-respected by her colleagues simply because of her education.  She was newly hired for tenure-track professorship at the time.

But fearing teachers is something I learned when I was in middle school.  I was smarter than some of my teachers (more inquisitive, expected in depth answers) and for me to question them, they felt insecure and attempted, successfully, to shut me down.  After a going through a couple of these kinds of teachers, I simply stopped asking questions to all of my teachers.

This is the important part about why teachers behaved the way they did toward me: for some reason, people think I'm very smart. If I ask the question, they become insecure.  If someone else asks the same question, they don't feel threatened.  The difference is probably in that I expect a much better answer than they provide.

Offline chadbrochill17

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #43 on: October 15, 2012, 05:48:31 AM »
Then I am deeply sorry for your experiences. A good teacher will spend every minute it takes to make sure a student is understanding the material. The stories you two have told I think are worthy enough of bringing it to the principal or president's attention. Seriously.
High school is the diving board to your higher education so without a solid foundation, and that includes confidence in the material and confidence in yourself, you are going to flop.

I know it's probably too late at this point, but can you switch teachers? Or maybe if you're a junior you can find the teachers that have great reputations and try and get in their class for next year?

Offline rachmaninoff_forever

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #44 on: October 15, 2012, 12:05:12 PM »


I know it's probably too late at this point, but can you switch teachers? Or maybe if you're a junior you can find the teachers that have great reputations and try and get in their class for next year?

I'm a senior, and I can't switch.
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Offline lloyd_cdb

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #45 on: October 15, 2012, 12:51:22 PM »
I think the derivative is wrong. Wouldn't it be f'(x)=2sinxcosx-cosx? Either way, you need a cosx somewhere in that first term.


2sinxcosx = sin(2x).  I find it easier to derive it to the second function, just makes more sense in my head, might just be memorized from the frequency it's used.  It needed to be expanded anyway to solve for zero, so it didn't matter too much.

Not every teacher cares about the student's performance.  Some only care about their performance review.  I've had classes dumbed down so that people who had no idea what was going on could still get a top score.  I've also had classes where the teacher expected everyone to understand word for word what they were teaching (I failed that class, along with half the other students).  I tore my shoulder in college and tried to withdraw from a math class because I couldn't write.  My professor said "too bad, use a computer".  If anyone has ever taken Linear Algebra and tried to type out 20 problems of matrices with one hand (or even typed out any math), you can appreciate how much longer it takes than writing...  :'(
I've been trying to give myself a healthy reminder: http://internetsarcasm.com/

Offline rachmaninoff_forever

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #46 on: October 15, 2012, 11:59:44 PM »
God damn it she called my parents and told me to come see her 7:30 every morning!

 :'( :'(
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Offline j_menz

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #47 on: October 16, 2012, 12:07:23 AM »
God damn it she called my parents and told me to come see her 7:30 every morning!

 :'( :'(

Evidently she cares about you and your results. Make ther most of the opportunity.
"What the world needs is more geniuses with humility. There are so few of us left" -- Oscar Levant

Offline rachmaninoff_forever

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #48 on: October 16, 2012, 12:08:18 AM »
Evidently she cares about you and your results. Make ther most of the opportunity.

This is gonna be terrible...
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Offline j_menz

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Re: Pianostreet calculus group
«Reply #49 on: October 16, 2012, 12:11:28 AM »
This is gonna be terrible...

Nah.  Initially awkward and uncomfortable, but ultimately all good.
"What the world needs is more geniuses with humility. There are so few of us left" -- Oscar Levant