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What Does a Pianist See?

In this video, eye-tracking glasses are used to show exactly where the gaze of a pianist is directed while playing. A professional concert pianist and his student take turns using the glasses, revealing interesting facts about how experience makes a great difference in terms of effective eye movement, both when playing from memory and from a piano score. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Mozart - Ah! Vous dirai je maman, 12 Variations  (Read 11687 times)
ai1888
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« on: November 05, 2013, 06:51:18 PM »

Just me struggling with this piece. My problems were to keep a steady tempo, and to achieve speeds that most pianists do.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dNPlfkaocvU
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piano sheet music of 12 Variations on
arjunish2006
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« Reply #1 on: November 07, 2013, 10:32:42 PM »

Anyone? ...Bueller?
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awesom_o
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« Reply #2 on: November 07, 2013, 11:15:18 PM »

Good work, ai1888!

I enjoyed your rendition.

Your problems are all in your head.

It sounded as though you tried to play the entire piece as though a metronome were ticking beside you.

Relax! Sing each part of the music with the beauty that it warrants! Don't worry about playing it at speeds other pianists play at!

Your work here should be between you and Mozart alone. What other pianists do is irrelevant to what you do.

Learn to play with a tempo that is steady, yet flexible as well. This will help your playing to develop greater intensity of feeling. Right now it sounds just a bit stiff. 

Rubato!

Well done though.
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arjunish2006
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« Reply #3 on: November 08, 2013, 05:22:52 PM »

Thanks awesome_o. Those are very good advice and suggestions. Learning to sing each part certainly works when I am practicing, but when I am recording, I am under constant pressure to play the right notes, that it takes precedence over the quality of music.

You say learn to play steady yet flexible. How does one do that?

Thanks again for the feedback!
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awesom_o
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« Reply #4 on: November 08, 2013, 06:19:16 PM »

Thanks awesome_o. Those are very good advice and suggestions. Learning to sing each part certainly works when I am practicing, but when I am recording, I am under constant pressure to play the right notes, that it takes precedence over the quality of music.

You say learn to play steady yet flexible. How does one do that?

Thanks again for the feedback!


Recording music is something that you should leave until you are extremely advanced.
What you are doing here isn't really recording. It's you giving a practice performance on video.

You need to learn that there really is no such thing as constant pressure to play the right notes.

The quality of the music MUST take precedence over the quality of the 'performance'.

Steady yet flexible=good rubato.

I would recommend improvisation as one of the best ways of developing your understanding of rubato.
 

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