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David Campbell - piano teacher at the LCM in the 1970s (Read 2518 times)

Offline psmith_1959

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David Campbell - piano teacher at the LCM in the 1970s
« on: May 20, 2014, 09:40:15 PM »
This is my first post so apologies if this is the wrong sort of thing to ask in this forum.
In the 1970s I had some piano lessons at the London College of Music. In those days it was in Great Marlborough Street not far from the London Palladium and the Principal was William Lloyd Webber (father of Andrew). My piano teacher was a youngish gentleman called David Campbell (not to be confused with the famous clarinettist with the same name) and he was very good and taught me a lot. I lost touch with him in the 1980s and would love to make contact with him again. I've "Googled" him but can't find any reference at all to him on the internet. It's a bit of a long shot but I was wondering if anyone on here remembers him or knows where he might be now.

Offline nicholas

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Re: David Campbell - piano teacher at the LCM in the 1970s
«Reply #1 on: February 06, 2021, 12:15:05 AM »
Hello,
I'm not sure whether you'll pick up this message but I thought, out of courtesy to both you and to David, that I should give it a try.
Poor David died young, in about 1992, he was a good friend of mine and an exceptionally kind and generous individual, his family and friends, including myself, were with him to the end.
As you'll remember, David was an excellent teacher, talented in the extreme and full of enthusiasm that he passed on to his pupils. I understand that, at that time, David was the youngest teacher that the LCM had ever had and he expanded on that position by giving private piano lessons and regular seasons of music appreciation classes at the Richmond Adult College and numerous other locations: for these classes he had a most impressive following.
David's life might have been short but he certainly put it to good use, working on and researching his preferred interest, music, and freely passing on his knowledge to others: David was most fortunate in that he was able to enrich his life and that of others, with his passion for music.
I hope that this has given you at least some of the information on David that you were seeking.
With kindest regards, Nicholas

Offline psmith_1959

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Re: David Campbell - piano teacher at the LCM in the 1970s
«Reply #2 on: February 09, 2021, 11:20:03 AM »
Dear Nicholas
Thank you so much for taking the time to respond to this, especially as I had given up hoping for a reply as it was so long ago.
I am incredibly sorry to hear the sad news that David had died. But it's nice to hear that he had good friends such as yourself to support him. As you say, he was immensely talented, and a truly inspirational piano teacher, and I have such fond memories of him. I work as a freelance pianist and piano teacher, and I often hear myself echoing things to my pupils that David used to say to me! He made such a difference to my own piano playing, and to the way I teach - I very much regret losing touch with him.
Thanks once again for passing the news about David on to me - I am most grateful to know, and glad to feel that he is at peace.

Offline nicholas

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Re: David Campbell - piano teacher at the LCM in the 1970s
«Reply #3 on: February 09, 2021, 12:45:15 PM »
I'm so pleased to know that you found my reply to your message of so long ago.

How marvellous to hear that you're able to pass on some of David's enthusiasm to your own pupils: continuity in teaching and the appreciation that all good teachers can leave behind them a useful legacy is marvellous and can only enrich the musical community.

David would be so very happy and grateful to know that through you he had played a part, no matter how slight, in the progression of musical education and it is most generous of you to acknowledge that he was in some small way able to inspire you in aspects your work. I hope that, in years to come, your pupils will in turn pass on to others the love for music that you so obviously feel and have conveyed to them.

With very best wishes, Nicholas