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Author Topic: Music theory through playing piano  (Read 1369 times)
supersalms
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« on: November 20, 2014, 07:19:58 PM »

I am just starting to learn and enjoy playing piano. I came across bernhard's posts on Bach's invention and I just loved the way he was approaching it. I started learning about motives, phrases, etc. I am looking for a resource to help me understand music theory as I'm learning a new piece of music.

I have taken a music theory course in college, but I really didn't grasp it much because it wasn't really put in perspective. I find the opportunity to learn a piece, and analyze it to understand the practical aspect of music theory motivating for me to understand and really learn the piece. I hope that makes sense... So does anyone here know of a good book that would introduce music theory and piano pieces hand in hand?

Thanks all!
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chopinlover01
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« Reply #1 on: November 21, 2014, 12:34:23 AM »

livingpianovideos on youtube, they do some of that. Mostly things about technique, though, which would also benefit you immensely. What in specific are you looking for? It would help immensely with those trying to help you.
Cheers!

EDIT: I don't know why I didn't think of this earlier- Music Theory for dummies. They have in-score examples all the time. Great read, and usually pretty cheap (I got mine for $10 new). In that book, they mention other good reads, as per usual with the Dummies' series.
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theholygideons
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« Reply #2 on: November 21, 2014, 02:34:32 AM »

Intro to music theory courses are usually very surface level, try going deeper into music theory and then things will click, imho.
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supersalms
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« Reply #3 on: November 21, 2014, 04:06:09 PM »

Intro to music theory courses are usually very surface level, try going deeper into music theory and then things will click, imho.

I think this is key. I'll keep working on it.

livingpianovideos on youtube, they do some of that. Mostly things about technique, though, which would also benefit you immensely. What in specific are you looking for? It would help immensely with those trying to help you.
Cheers!

EDIT: I don't know why I didn't think of this earlier- Music Theory for dummies. They have in-score examples all the time. Great read, and usually pretty cheap (I got mine for $10 new). In that book, they mention other good reads, as per usual with the Dummies' series.

These videos seem helpful! (Things like this: "What is counterpoint?" are helpful to me in the context of what I'm working on right now)

I guess it's hard for me to pinpoint what I'm looking for in general. I'm working on inventions at the moment and I found a great book that analyzes them and I'm just working along and trying to understand the concepts they talk about that way.

I'll look into music theory for dummies and see.

Thanks all!
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theholygideons
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« Reply #4 on: November 22, 2014, 05:16:59 AM »

I think this is key. I'll keep working on it.

These videos seem helpful! (Things like this: "What is counterpoint?" are helpful to me in the context of what I'm working on right now)

I guess it's hard for me to pinpoint what I'm looking for in general. I'm working on inventions at the moment and I found a great book that analyzes them and I'm just working along and trying to understand the concepts they talk about that way.

I'll look into music theory for dummies and see.

Thanks all!
try buy theory of harmony by arnold schoenberg, that's the level you want to be at, where things will start to click.
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