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Author Topic: Guitar chords against Chopin's music  (Read 733 times)
stillofthenight
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« on: February 26, 2016, 11:30:17 PM »

Hello, I am trying to put guitar chords against some of my favorite Chopin pieces to play on my guitar. I am interested in the underlying chord progressions that make up the piece. However, I have a pretty hard time trying to pick the correct chord to place in the measures that best fits a tonal harmony framework.

I am interested in the underlying chords for Nocturne No.72

Is it sensible or practical to even do this? I am in a sense treating it like a piece of popular music where you would open the book and see a lot of chords above the measures. I am not trying to play melodies at the same time due to obvious difficulties...I just want the sole chords that sound the best in voice leading etc.
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iansinclair
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« Reply #1 on: March 04, 2016, 01:56:17 AM »

It would be perfectly possible.  Indeed, if your guitar technique is good enough it might be a very acceptable approach!  That is, I presume you are referring to Op. 72 No. 1 (posthumous)?  That has a very clear melody line -- which is highly repetitious.  For chord analysis, I would look first, though, to the left hand and simply use those chords.  For example.  The first two measures are e minor.  Third is b minor/g major.  Fourth is b major/e minor.  And so on.  It does get a bit complicated, and, of course, there are extra notes which are not in the chord but which contribute greatly to the effect of the piece.  The right hand can be played -- if you are using classical technique -- as written.

Have fun!
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Ian
pencilart3
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« Reply #2 on: March 04, 2016, 03:10:29 AM »

Spare me. Please.
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stillofthenight
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« Reply #3 on: June 12, 2016, 07:31:40 AM »

Is there any textbooks or professional accurate contextual analysis of the Chopin Nocturnes? I am  looking so I can easily know the chords that are passing by.

If so , what are some good books or resources?

Thanks.
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