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Topic: Beethovenīs sonata 101 (1st mov) turn question  (Read 1809 times)

Offline pianinha

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Beethovenīs sonata 101 (1st mov) turn question
on: February 19, 2017, 10:53:15 AM
So here is my pet peeve....

The turn is right in the start...

Common ways as followed by wikipedia is as such ( we all hate wikipedia)

Following the wikipedia rule, the turn should be done closer to the next B.....but most pianists play the turn as if it is above the 1st tempo.

Not sure if you get me.

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Offline mike_lang

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Re: Beethovenīs sonata 101 (1st mov) turn question
Reply #1 on: May 01, 2017, 12:41:28 PM
So here is my pet peeve....

The turn is right in the start...

Common ways as followed by wikipedia is as such ( we all hate wikipedia)

Following the wikipedia rule, the turn should be done closer to the next B.....but most pianists play the turn as if it is above the 1st tempo.

Not sure if you get me.



It's a vocal gesture . . . needs a little more time. Think about how a singer would do it, especially having to ascend an octave afterward . . .

Offline lmpianist

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Re: Beethovenīs sonata 101 (1st mov) turn question
Reply #2 on: May 15, 2017, 05:30:38 AM
It shouldn't be timed in any precise/mechanical way.  This entire passage is very tender/lyrical, so think about how the turn contributes to the overall shape.  Let it sing.  But, be careful not to have what I think Tovey described as annoying mannerisms in the tempo... there are only two ritards marked in the entire movement, so whatever you're doing, don't exaggerate it or draw too much attention to it.  This movement is deceptively difficult, almost in the extreme, to play musically and to play well.  I've been working on it, plus the other three, for 8 months now, and I still have problems getting a good performance out of the first movement that I'm satisfied with.  In a way the fugue is easier.  Keep at it.
 

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