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Pianist Magazine Celebrates 100 Issues

Not only Claude Debussy and Leonard Bernstein celebrate centennials this year, but also the London based Pianist Magazine which celebrated its 100th issue on January 26. Pianist Magazine is one of the most widespread and appreciated sources in the international piano world today. We called the magazine’s editor Erica Worth not only to congratulate, but also to ask her a couple of questions. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Beethovenīs sonata 101 (1st mov) turn question  (Read 678 times)
pianinha
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« on: February 19, 2017, 10:53:15 AM »

So here is my pet peeve....

The turn is right in the start...

Common ways as followed by wikipedia is as such ( we all hate wikipedia)

Following the wikipedia rule, the turn should be done closer to the next B.....but most pianists play the turn as if it is above the 1st tempo.

Not sure if you get me.



* turn.jpg (44.26 KB, 410x323 - viewed 12 times.)

* transferir.jpg (31.3 KB, 214x179 - viewed 12 times.)
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michael_langlois
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« Reply #1 on: May 01, 2017, 12:41:28 PM »

So here is my pet peeve....

The turn is right in the start...

Common ways as followed by wikipedia is as such ( we all hate wikipedia)

Following the wikipedia rule, the turn should be done closer to the next B.....but most pianists play the turn as if it is above the 1st tempo.

Not sure if you get me.



It's a vocal gesture . . . needs a little more time. Think about how a singer would do it, especially having to ascend an octave afterward . . .
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lmpianist
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« Reply #2 on: May 15, 2017, 05:30:38 AM »

It shouldn't be timed in any precise/mechanical way.  This entire passage is very tender/lyrical, so think about how the turn contributes to the overall shape.  Let it sing.  But, be careful not to have what I think Tovey described as annoying mannerisms in the tempo... there are only two ritards marked in the entire movement, so whatever you're doing, don't exaggerate it or draw too much attention to it.  This movement is deceptively difficult, almost in the extreme, to play musically and to play well.  I've been working on it, plus the other three, for 8 months now, and I still have problems getting a good performance out of the first movement that I'm satisfied with.  In a way the fugue is easier.  Keep at it.
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