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December 16, 2017, 11:11:28 AM *
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Schiff Horses Around in Master Class

In a piano masterclass on Schubert’s Moments Musical at The International Musicians Seminar at Prussia Cove, Andras Schiff noted, for one of his students, that, in Schubert’s time, horse-drawn conveyances were the norm instead of just a tourist attraction. Read more >>

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Author Topic: First fathers day Improvisation (video)  (Read 250 times)
nickc
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« on: June 19, 2017, 01:29:40 PM »

first fathers day.... to a beautiful but very restless newborn daughter haha. Cheers to all the Dads...

I am fond of this work as it incorporates so many unique musical Ideas, ie. contrapuntal stride piano, light musical references to Chopin, Beethoven and Bach.  Blues, Jazz and rock harmonies mixed with "classical" ideas with a hint of Scriabin/Ravel...  The piece is both serious and light hearted. An interesting mix of emotions, just like parenthood. Take care,

Nicholas

1) 0:00 Prelude to fatherhood...
2) 4:26 Introduction to...
3) 5:26 DAD
4) 7:21 Foul Fowl (a conversation with a bird)
5) 8:13 DAD... moving along





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ted
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« Reply #1 on: June 22, 2017, 05:34:48 AM »

There are several general features of your improvising which are conducive to free flow and the maintaining of interest. Firstly, you do not allow the physical aspect to dominate your idea generation; your technique appears to be controlled and subordinate to the musical impulse. While I see no reason why the haptic element ought not to be a legitimate driver of ideas, if given too much command it is inclined to outstrip music, especially in those possessing strong technique. Secondly, your phrasing and rhythm is always very clearly articulated, with each cell lucidly defined, regardless of whether it forms by similarity or contrast.

All sections I found enjoyable, particularly the stride and the fugato, which latter I felt could have been expanded a great deal more and gone on longer to good effect. Few people seem able to keep imitation baroque (for want of a better term) going as you can, so why not exploit the idiom more, perhaps with modern rhythms ? Overall, another thoroughly enjoyable improvisation.

Are you sure the best place for your recorder is sitting on the piano ? I spent a whole day testing my Zoom H2 and found the best results with it screwed on a tripod just inside the curve of the piano.

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"It's a caution, grandson !"  -  My grandmother's reaction to almost any issue of the day.
furtwaengler
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« Reply #2 on: June 22, 2017, 06:37:41 AM »

I love it. Great command of resonance, great and meaningful ornamentation. To repeat what another pianist said of Richard Goode’s recording of Beethoven’s final sonata op. 111, “He has two right hands.” It think that applies to your ambidextrous fluidity. Your are able to keep contrapuntal motivs going and sound great in every style. I heard the G minor Ballade peak in for a bit. And I was going to mention on the other thread, but beautiful instrument and a fascinating history it has with Myra Hess and all. It’s nice to see such an instrument is safe in good hands.
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Don't let anyone know where you tie your goat.
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