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No Great Music Without Great Tension

Anthony Tommassini, classical music critic for The New York Times, invites us all to a mini-lecture at the piano on dissonance. With a series of examples by well known composers, Tommassini elaborates on one of the most crucial components in Western music. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Liszt - Études d´exécution transcendante  (Read 201 times)
aszer97
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« on: September 01, 2017, 05:48:13 PM »

Hey,
I' m really into the transcendental etudes, although i know that they are far away from what I'm able to play(at least until now Cry ). I rather see them(especially no.4 - Mazeppa) as a goal I maybe never reach. Nevertheless I want beginn them by studying the no.3 - Paysage. This piece seems (at least in comparison to the rest) relatively easy or rather playable to me.
Unfortunately I have no teacher at the moment, because I study abroad, but I'm reading books about piano technique & music-theory.
I would consider myself as intermediate, maybe early-advanced, but to estimate my level, here are the last pieces i learned:

- Liszt S136 no.1 & no.4
- Beethoven op. 2 no.1
- Bach Präludium & Fuge BWV 884
- Bach French Suite 817

- and  currently working on the fuge in c minor BWV 847

Do you think no.3 is manageable for me?

I'm sure such Questions are not rare and maybe there are stupid, but:
I really want to improve my technique on a lonterm-view in a way to be able to play all of these studies one day(in the distant future). How is it possible to reach such a level or at least master the step from my level to a more advanced level where pieces like chopin etudes or the Waldstein sonata are within the range of playable pieces - more Liszt S.136 Etudes? Czerny ?

Thanks for your answers and helpful tipps!
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chopinawesome
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« Reply #1 on: September 02, 2017, 06:00:10 AM »

Why don't you try TE no.3 first and see if it is hard?
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Schumann Kreisleriana Op.16
Scriabin Sonata No.4 Op.30
Rach Op.42
Prok Toccata
Future:
-Resume Ravel Concerto G
-Bach BWV 831
-Chopin Concerti 1 and 2
-Maybe Beethoven waldstein
aszer97
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« Reply #2 on: September 02, 2017, 10:22:15 AM »

Hey,
I have already sight-readed through the first page hands seperate and it doesn't seem to be very hard(except some big intervalls in the left hand). But in the past I often had the problem, that I began to study something I thought I could handle and weeks later I stopped, because I realized thats its out of my league (for example Chopin op. 10 no.3). I think, that maybe this is the reason why I doesn't seem to get any better. It was very depressing to invest so much time in something I couldn't finish, due to my own misjudgement. In this case I'm very unsure, thats the reason why I'm asking.

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visitor
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« Reply #3 on: September 02, 2017, 11:58:13 AM »

Hey,
I have already sight-readed through the first page hands seperate and it doesn't seem to be very hard(except some big intervalls in the left hand). But in the past I often had the problem, that I began to study something I thought I could handle and weeks later I stopped, because I realized thats its out of my league (for example Chopin op. 10 no.3). I think, that maybe this is the reason why I doesn't seem to get any better. It was very depressing to invest so much time in something I couldn't finish, due to my own misjudgement. In this case I'm very unsure, thats the reason why I'm asking.


Yoiu should not just be  learning pieces from the beginning amd especially for assessment to see if ready you should isolate various sections and good start and learn piecdes from the end and work way back to front

Let's say you habe a 100 measure work
You might start and do mm 60 to 80 and also 40 to 60, then maybe 20 to 40

Then say 80 to 100,then put them together 40 to 100, then go back and learn the beginning say1 to 20 and finally put it all together....
Just saying, it helps you not fall into the trap of always having the earliest first parts of the music super solid, and then the end is a total mess For a while....also this allows memory stations in performance, if you were to crash on stage you won't burn, you can improve a transition  and skip to next section and keep going, or worst case scenario you just start the next closest section if that stops you from heaven forbid, stopping completely and going back to the beginning of a piece and start over...
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