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Topic: Next Piece  (Read 2199 times)

Offline cjb368

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Next Piece
on: November 27, 2020, 02:02:45 PM
Hello,
I will be starting my 4th year of piano studies in 2021.
I am self taught, except for 5 lessons my wife gave me as a gift. The lessons were good,the teacher helped me with some problems(lack of theory and flat fingers, poor pedaling and other common beginner problems) She also gave me the confidence to start Fur Elise in its entirety.
I have a decent repertoire I play
 for myself and wife( Carnagie Hall is not in my future!)
Some examples
Fur Elise
Chopin waltz in A minor
Gymnopedie
Bach Prelude in C
To a Wild Rose
Other less complicated pieces.
I just worked through Traumerei. I can play it in its entirety,it needs some work though.
My question is,I would like to give Clair De Lune a try, but I have a feeling it may be a frustrating choice.
I also really like the 2nd mvt of Beethoven's
Pathatique.
Are either of these too difficult? Are there better choices for my level.
I enjoy slower more relaxing pieces.
Thank you.
Claude

Offline pianowhisper

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Re: Next Piece
Reply #1 on: November 27, 2020, 03:01:01 PM
Hello,

I'm terrible at comparing "difficulties" of pieces since you and only you know your true struggles and capabilities. You can (and should) always play what you want in my opinion, and decide for yourself if the piece is a good choice!

Personally, I'd say the Debussy is quite more advanced than the stuff you've mentioned. It is true that once you memorize the hand positions for the arpeggios it flows (hah) very naturally, but I'd still say it is a huge leap from your current repertoire. Also for a starting Debussy piece what would you think of some of his Préludes instead? La Fille aux Cheveux de Lin is a quite approachable piece, or then one of my personal favorites, Bruyères, both being on the slower side and arguably easier than Clair de Lune.

The Beethoven to me is technically easier to tackle and I'd guess it would be similar to Traumerei although I haven't played the latter. You could also have a look at Beethoven's "easy" sonatas, Op.49/1 and 49/2 which could give you a nice "boost" in a few more technical aspects. :)

Hope this helps, good luck!
Best,
pw

Offline dogperson

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Re: Next Piece
Reply #2 on: November 27, 2020, 03:29:16 PM
I also agree that Clair de Lune is a big leap.  For future reference, you might explore
Pianosyllabus.com: you can search by composer, type, name, Grade or any combination.  ‘Grades’ are assigned by testing boards and can’t be used as ‘gospel’.  Assigning grade levels is not only inexact, but you might find a particular composer or style easier than I would. We are all different.

Offline j_tour

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Re: Next Piece
Reply #3 on: November 27, 2020, 10:55:24 PM
The Beethoven to me is technically easier to tackle and I'd guess it would be similar to Traumerei although I haven't played the latter. You could also have a look at Beethoven's "easy" sonatas, Op.49/1 and 49/2 which could give you a nice "boost" in a few more technical aspects. :)

I'm also in agreement.  Yes, it's not as though the Clair de Lune movement (or, say, one of the Arabesques) could not be played, but I suspect that could lead to more frustration at your stage.  Although you seem to have a strong work ethic, so I couldn't really say for sure.  Just depends how much effort you want to put into it, and especially how strong your arpeggios are (for both the Suite Bergamesque movement and for the second Arabesque (or "Arabesk"):  about the latter, as well as the  former, it just depends if you're up to playing two against three and some variations, in addition to the notes. 

We could talk about Brahms all day when it comes to similar challenges.

Very hard to say without knowing more about your mechanical or musical ability. 

The Beethoven movement from the Pathétique is a good choice, although that will present some novel challenges.  There's plenty of Beethoven slow movements from the middle period that can be played with even less difficulty, but I'd recommend just reading through them and finding what speaks to you and go for it.

If the Pathétique Ab major movement speaks to you, you should give it a shot, but I wouldn't underestimate it, in that it's not exactly a completely trivial or easy piece.  Relatively speaking, you know.

You will learn a lot in the process, though.  It's more difficult than the Schumann Träumerei, but not impossible if you can handle bringing out the melody in one hand while simultaneously performing accompaniment in the same hand.

Also, kind of a slow, almost meditative piece, the first movement from Op. 27 no. 1 (not the "Moonlight" but the sonata that precedes it in the same opus number).  It's fairly substantial in length, but not difficult at all, especially if you are comfortable running scales smoothly in the LH.  I think András Schiff compared it in one of his lectures on the sonatas from the UK to a kind of lullaby-type piece.

As well as from the Op 126 Bagatelles (a few of those are a bit tricky, but you can certainly work through at least a few of them without too much trouble).  Perhaps the very last one from the set you might find affinity with, and can play with a bit of effort.  Probably about the same difficulty as the Pathétique slow movement (don't be frightened by the very fast little flourish at the beginning and end [just omit it if you like:  it's just a brief scalar passage built around the authentic cadence...doesn't matter IMHO] most of the piece is rather slow and contemplative, with some interesting harmonies).  And the second-to-last one in the set you can play, as well as the first, perhaps some of the others.   The First one and the Fifth one are probably the easiest of the set, and have a simple, almost rustic feel to them (yes, the first one has a couple of fast scalar runs in the RH, but if you're not up to that, the piano police won't come for you if you play them at a speed you can do:  they're just little flourishes, more or less to épater les bourgeois!)

Good recommendations above about alternate pieces from Debussy.  I personally find the slower works of Debussy to be challenging in a musical sense, but the notes themselves are not necessarily very difficult.  Or if you really want slow, evocative, and a bit odd from Debussy, there's "Jimbo's Lullaby" from the "Children's Corner" suite, but it is a pretty strange little work.  I know some people find it a bit strange, but I like it, and you could certainly play it.  The precise rhythm would be the main technical challenge.  Quite a few choices should be available to you from the préludes and fit your tastes.

TBH while I...what do they call it in English, "The girl with the flaxen hair," I believe it's a marvelous piece, it's almost deceptive IMHO.  Yes, any child (the suite is not written to played by children, as such, but rather to amuse Debussy's sense of childhood reveries) can play the notes, but I find it complicated to make coherent music out of.

If you want something a bit different, there are a great many slower pieces scattered throughout Bach's suites and elsewhere.  For example, for a very well-known piece which you can play, just the Aria from the Goldberg Variations would fit the bill pretty well.  You might not choose to play it at the fairly brisk tempo from Gould's first recording of it, but, then again, you might.  You have some options there for interpretation. 

Also an ideal choice for doing some metronome work if you find your performance becomes a bit sluggish at times, but it's just as likely you'd have no trouble with it at all.  Good opportunity to work on subdividing if you find that's necessary.  That simple piece as well has its own little challenges, but nothing you couldn't handle.  No, I don't recommend using pedal on it, but if it's necessary to connect the bass motion in the second "half" of the aria, then so be it.

The audience need never know!

And, yes, there are several of the variations which don't feature the kind of brutal dual-manual stacked clavichord scale running, which you can also play, but I'd start with the Aria first.  In whatever fashion you like it.  Yes, you'd have a number of decisions to make, about tempo, ornamentation, and so forth, but that's most of the fun of being a musician, no? 
My name is Nellie, and I take pride in helping protect the children of my community through active leadership roles in my local church and in the Boy Scouts of America.  Bad word make me sad.

Offline cjb368

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Re: Next Piece
Reply #4 on: November 28, 2020, 01:32:10 PM
Thank you for the feedback, I will try something easier moving forward.
I practice often, but the piano is a difficult endeavor.
Ill keep those pieces for when I improve.
Thx again

Offline j_tour

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Re: Next Piece
Reply #5 on: November 28, 2020, 04:35:25 PM
Thank you for the feedback, I will try something easier moving forward.
I practice often, but the piano is a difficult endeavor.
Ill keep those pieces for when I improve.
Thx again

That's absolutely my pleasure.

I hope I didn't frighten you off the Ab movement from the Pathétique:  it does lie quite nicely under the hands, and if you have a passion for the piece, I think you not only could play it, you probably should.  Mostly, if you have a good sense of rhythm, and a bit of finger independence, you can do it.  Plus, I'm sure you've heard the piece many times, so that helps.

I'd just caution you that it's not quite as hurr-durr stupid to play as it sounds, perhaps, so I'd be ready for a few opportunities to add a few technical tricks to your bag.

ETA Oh, no here's something you didn't mention, but the Mozart D minor Rondo (I forgot the Kirchel [sp?}) number....definitely within your ability, and it encompasses a range of moods, from slow and contemplative to rather jaunty and light-hearted.  As with some of the others, there are a few little RH scalar runs based off the octatonic/diminished scale, but there's nothing that says you must play those at blinding speed.  They're not a huge part of the piece, just little moments to give a little flashy interest to the piece and demarcate some of the structure.  You could even just block those off into chords, if you wish, and get close to the same effect.

I know I kind of turned the verbal firehose on you, but that's just my way of trying to be as complete as possible.
My name is Nellie, and I take pride in helping protect the children of my community through active leadership roles in my local church and in the Boy Scouts of America.  Bad word make me sad.

Offline pianowhisper

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Re: Next Piece
Reply #6 on: November 29, 2020, 10:23:46 AM
The Beethoven movement from the Pathétique is a good choice, although that will present some novel challenges.  There's plenty of Beethoven slow movements from the middle period that can be played with even less difficulty, but I'd recommend just reading through them and finding what speaks to you and go for it.

If the Pathétique Ab major movement speaks to you, you should give it a shot, but I wouldn't underestimate it, in that it's not exactly a completely trivial or easy piece.  Relatively speaking, you know.
Also, kind of a slow, almost meditative piece, the first movement from Op. 27 no. 1 (not the "Moonlight" but the sonata that precedes it in the same opus number).  It's fairly substantial in length, but not difficult at all, especially if you are comfortable running scales smoothly in the LH.  I think András Schiff compared it in one of his lectures on the sonatas from the UK to a kind of lullaby-type piece.
Agreed. Für Elise followed by the Moonlight 1st were my entryway to Beethoven when I was a kid. The Pathétique 2nd is indeed not to be underestimated. There isn't a lot of tricky flourishes, polyrhythm, or other arguably more advanced techniques that some other slow movements from Beethoven sonatas present, but the voicing is an important feature that is hard to show with nuance on a first approach to the piece.
To the OP, just like j_tour said, if that particular movement speaks to you, go for it and I'm sure the progress will come in time.

TBH while I...what do they call it in English, "The girl with the flaxen hair," I believe it's a marvelous piece, it's almost deceptive IMHO.  Yes, any child (the suite is not written to played by children, as such, but rather to amuse Debussy's sense of childhood reveries) can play the notes, but I find it complicated to make coherent music out of.
I'd say virtually all of Debussy is somewhat complicated to make coherent music out of. ;D Still, considering all his repertoire, maybe that particular prélude can be seen as a good first entryway to his music? Of course, thinking better about them now I can see some other préludes which could pose less problem. In any case, the Suite Bergamasque and the Arabesques are indeed a little bit more advanced.
To the OP, that does not mean these "can't" be learned. It all boils down to how much you love the piece and how much effort you put into it. I'll never forget the time when I, having never played Rachmaninoff before, casually started learning his Etude-Tableau Op.39/6 ;D and it worked (and let me emphasize this: barely worked), but it is probably the last piece I'd suggest for someone to start on Rachmaninoff. lol

Good luck! Cheers,
pw

Offline j_tour

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Re: Next Piece
Reply #7 on: November 29, 2020, 11:00:42 AM
Quote from: pianowhisper link=topic=67132.msg704009#msg704009 date=1606645426I
'd say virtually all of Debussy is somewhat complicated to make coherent music out of. ;D

</shakes fist in mock anger at the sky>!

Yeah, that is probably true, what you say.

Still, there's always "Jimbo's Lullaby"!  The kids love it!  Well...none that I've met....but it's still fun and very easy to play!

Children seem to have a fantastic affinity for playing major second clusters...and yet they don't seem to care for it when others do it!  No, I have never taught kids: I suppose I could, guide them through some method books as long as I got paid, but...not very interesting to me.

Just to clarify, I was talking about the first movement from Op. 27/1, not Op. 27/2, but since you brought the C#m up....yeah, the OP can play that.  (first movement and the second only, alhough the Presto agitato is frankly not that bad....not a good choice for the OP, though!)  For me and probably many people, I and perhaps they should be rather glad to never hear or play the Op. 27/2 again, any movements, but I think the Op. 27/1 is unjustly neglected, and the first movement is unfairly neglected, as is the rest of the sonata (which also does include a sort-of slow movement.)

Easier, but less iconic than the Pathétique slow movement.  But, it's not really a complete piece of music, that movement:  the whole sonata (Op. 27/1) is kind of dove-tailed together in a few fays.  The first movement of Op. 27/1 (aka NOT the "moonlight") does stand on its own, though, and you'd enjoy playing it, I believe.  You will not finding it taxing in the least, I'd wager.

And, after my little encomium to Bach's small, tuneful pieces, certainly in WTCI and II, but also in the Inventions and Sinfonia.  I think you'd just have to read through them or listen to them and see what's appealing and reasonable to play.  I'd think all most of the latter are reasonable for the OP to play, particularly since he or she as a wild hare for slower, contemplative pieces.  As well as a good many of, at least, the préludes from Bks I and II of the WTC.  (Some of them).
My name is Nellie, and I take pride in helping protect the children of my community through active leadership roles in my local church and in the Boy Scouts of America.  Bad word make me sad.

Offline pianowhisper

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Re: Next Piece
Reply #8 on: November 29, 2020, 11:44:49 AM
</shakes fist in mock anger at the sky>!

Yeah, that is probably true, what you say.

Still, there's always "Jimbo's Lullaby"!  The kids love it!  Well...none that I've met....but it's still fun and very easy to play!

Children seem to have a fantastic affinity for playing major second clusters...and yet they don't seem to care for it when others do it!  No, I have never taught kids: I suppose I could, guide them through some method books as long as I got paid, but...not very interesting to me.

Just to clarify, I was talking about the first movement from Op. 27/1, not Op. 27/2, but since you brought the C#m up....yeah, the OP can play that.  For me and probably many people, I and perhaps they should be rather glad to never hear or play the Op. 27/2 again, any movements, but I think the Op. 27/1 is unjustly neglected, and the first movement is unfairly neglected, as is the rest of the sonata (which also does include a sort-of slow movement.)
hahaha I understand! I haven't played Debussy's Children's Corner so I can't say much on that. It's true that Jimbo's Lullaby is charming. I'd guess there are some weird rhythms to grasp at first? But overall a good option for Debussy indeed.

And I'm sorry about the Moonlight. I think I had read your reply way too fast or forgotten about the comparison when I quoted it lol. I honestly cannot agree more that at this point it has become a painfully overplayed piece. I just didn't care much for this matter when I was a kid I guess. I consider the Op.27/2 to still be a great piece of music and I had a good time with it. Being just an amateur/music lover, I think I've enjoyed it in a more "innocent" way, meaning the piece being overplayed didn't bother me much.
With that being said, no one can deny that the Op.27/1 is truly unfairly neglected, having its C#m counterpart right next to it. I played some of it in the past, not all, but I'd say the 1st movement is still a big leap in technique if we consider that Allegro section with broken arpeggios and runs. Maybe it is easier than it sounds?, I haven't played all of it. :)
All in all, absolutely, Beethoven has a lot of underplayed, brilliant sonatas and fairly approachable movements within them.

Best,
pw

Offline j_tour

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Re: Next Piece
Reply #9 on: November 29, 2020, 12:43:56 PM
Although the Rondo-form "Scherzo" kind of stands on its own from Op. 27/1 *second movement," event hough I'd probably put it at grade 4 or maybe even 5, so, sort of similar to other "intermiate-ish
 pieces (in fact the whole sonata I'd probably grade at most a "6" in the ABRSM syllabus, so, far from the most difficult, and I even think the last movement is a bit harder than the Pesto agitato from Op 27/2 (not sure, but, either equivalent or harder, but also easier in some ways) I don't think it would interest the OP, although he or she could play it!

ETA

Accidentally deleted my post.

Yes, dammit, I complete forgot the runs in thirds and minor thirds in the first movement of Op. 27/1.

Well, it's probably a little more interesting than running Czerney doing the same thing.

I don't have the energy to retype, but DAMMIT!

Completely forgot about that little bit of the opening movement.  Yeah, I sort of should takesy-backsies on that recommendation. 

Not that that little section isn't fun to play, but that would take a bit of doing, especially with some of the odd variations on those 2-handed runs.

And, no, I wasn't meaning to snark on you about Op 27/2 vs. Op 27/1:  just wanted to make sure it was clear from my end.

Clearly you know what's what about middle-period LvB, and like a bunch more. 

And, yes, you're right, "Jimbo's.L":  simple as it is, the rhythm has to be right.  I still have to concentrate a bit on the rare occasions I come back to that suite.

However, with the elephant theme, one could probably get away wilth stamping one's on the ground.  Not sure, but I like that whole suite.
My name is Nellie, and I take pride in helping protect the children of my community through active leadership roles in my local church and in the Boy Scouts of America.  Bad word make me sad.

Offline pianowhisper

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Re: Next Piece
Reply #10 on: November 29, 2020, 01:28:04 PM
I was actually referring to that section within the 1st movement where it changes from Andante (Eb major) to Allegro (C major), not really the C minor Scherzo. Those runs sound a little tricky to me, but maybe they fall more nicely under the fingers than expected.
I'd say the majority of the Andante from the 1st movement could interest the OP, and the middle C major section maybe for an extra challenge? It is a great sonata in its entirety coming to think of it...

EDIT
ahah Just saw your own edit. Yeah those are the runs I was referring to! Maybe too big of a leap for the OP but definitely a fun piece if s/he enjoys it enough to give it a try! :)

Offline j_tour

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Re: Next Piece
Reply #11 on: November 29, 2020, 02:07:27 PM
I was actually referring to that section within the 1st movement where it changes from Andante (Eb major) to Allegro (C major), not really the C minor Scherzo. Those runs sound a little tricky to me, but maybe they fall more nicely under the fingers than expected.
I'd say the majority of the Andante from the 1st movement could interest the OP, and the middle C major section maybe for an extra challenge? It is a great sonata in its entirety coming to think of it...

EDIT
ahah Just saw your own edit. Yeah those are the runs I was referring to! Maybe too big of a leap for the OP but definitely a fun piece if s/he enjoys it enough to give it a try! :)

Amazing. 

You're almost telepathic:  I don't know what I did to my post, probably somewhere in /dev/null or some crap.

No, for you, you can do the Allegro passages in thirds:  there are just some small subtleties that made them difficult for me to memorize.

And, yes, if one is of the school of thought that the slow movement is indeed a separate movement, then, indeed, it is easier than the Ab movement of the "Pathétique":  for that, as for the first movement, I'd be tempted, if I were the OP, to just edit out the transitional ideas and....well...if I were the OP, I'd still put the first movement of Op. 27/1 sort of on the back burner.

The allegro runs in thirds take a bit of doing, but it could be something to work towards.  And, of course, what better way to practice scales than in actual music?

Also, many of the variations from the beginning of Op. 26 are easier than the slow movement of the Pathétique.  Some of them are kind of tricky, but not all of them.

///////////

Yeah, we're on the same page, I'm happy to see.  (Yes, I think we agree the Scherzo from Op 27/1 is off the table:  not because the OP couldn't play it, but it doesn't to seem to fit his or her sensibilities).  It's still fun, though!

What do you think about the Mozart D minor Rondo for the OP?  (K 571?  Something like that, fairly late in Mozart's life, IIRC)?  Yeah, maybe the Alberti bass in the D maj section at the end could be a problem, but those octatonic/dim scale runs can just be substituted out if the OP isn't up to those.
My name is Nellie, and I take pride in helping protect the children of my community through active leadership roles in my local church and in the Boy Scouts of America.  Bad word make me sad.

Offline pianowhisper

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Re: Next Piece
Reply #12 on: November 29, 2020, 02:56:37 PM
Amazing. 

You're almost telepathic:  I don't know what I did to my post, probably somewhere in /dev/null or some crap.
ahahah I have no idea what happened. At first, I just only saw the first (before edit) part of your reply, I don't know if you had already edited it or not. Weird stuff from the page, but anyway...

When you mention the Op.26 it makes me sigh in wishful thinking because I absolutely love that piece and, still, for some reason whenever I tried practicing it I always found the variation with all the staccato jumps in that 1st movement so frustrating. It is far from an "astonishingly difficult" piece of music (whatever that might mean), I just couldn't commit myself enough to it.
And since we're speaking of Beethoven, to the OP I'd also maybe suggest, for future pieces:
Op.2/1, 2nd mov. (very lyrical, although presents some "fancy" ornaments here and there, but nothing too crazy)
Op.7, 2nd mov. (hauntingly beautiful and arguably not too difficult technically)
Op.10/3, 2nd mov. (maybe a bit too "deep" but it all boils down to how much you enjoy the music after all)

What do you think about the Mozart D minor Rondo for the OP?  (K 571?  Something like that, fairly late in Mozart's life, IIRC)?  Yeah, maybe the Clementi bass in the D maj section at the end could be a problem, but those octatonic/dim scale runs can just be substituted out if the OP isn't up to those.
I'm actually not familiar with this Rondo. The only one I could think of in D minor is the finale for his D minor concerto, but I doubt that's the one you're referring to. I couldn't really find the piece, if you ever come across a link or the K number I'd love to have a look myself! :)

Offline j_tour

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Re: Next Piece
Reply #13 on: November 29, 2020, 03:26:14 PM
ahahah I have no idea what happened. At first, I just only saw the first (before edit) part of your reply, I don't know if you had already edited it or not. Weird stuff from the page, but anyway...

Yeah, just one of those things, I guess.  Not intentional on my part.

Quote
When you mention the Op.26 it makes me sigh in wishful thinking because I absolutely love that piece and, still, for some reason whenever I tried practicing it I always found the variation with all the staccato jumps in that 1st movement so frustrating. It is far from an "astonishingly difficult" piece of music (whatever that might mean), I just couldn't commit myself enough to it.

I agree: some of the variations in Op. 26 are no joke. 

Even the Menuet+Trio is not a joke to play.  At least at the tempo I like.  You can hear that running voice shared between LH and RH at a rather brisk tempo.  And some nice legato thirds. 

Everybody knows the march.

The final rondo is so fun, but I wouldn't want to play it everyday.   I do try to keep that in memory just for....I don't know why....just in case I might need to play it at somebody ex tempore.

Quote
not familiar with this Rondo. The only one I could think of in D minor is the finale for his D minor concerto, but I doubt that's the one you're referring to. I couldn't really find the piece, if you ever come across a link or the K number I'd love to have a look myself! :)

Yeah, I bought about two dozen filing boxes and for once I can find something.

K397, Mozart.

I'm sure everyone's heard it, at least bits. 

Actually called a "Fantasy," as it does not have a rondo form.

I'm sure most people have heard it and possibly played through it several times.

My mistake for not being precise.
My name is Nellie, and I take pride in helping protect the children of my community through active leadership roles in my local church and in the Boy Scouts of America.  Bad word make me sad.

Offline pianowhisper

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Re: Next Piece
Reply #14 on: November 29, 2020, 03:50:59 PM
For the OP I agree probably most of the variations of Op.26 1st mov. are within reach if you like the piece! But the sonata in its entirety is full of hidden technical traps ;D

Yeah, I bought about two dozen filing boxes and for once I can find something.
K397, Mozart.
I'm sure everyone's heard it, at least bits. 
Actually called a "Fantasy," as it does not have a rondo form.
I'm sure most people have heard it and possibly played through it several times.
My mistake for not being precise.
No problem, now I know what you mean!
I haven't played the Fantasia (actually haven't played much of Mozart), but from my personal guess, I'd say it leans to a more advanced side? Probably because of the rapid scale runs and then the coda as you mentioned. But it's definitely something the OP could give a shot and it would improve a lot of his/her technique in different aspects. Most of the Fantasia remains within the "shady" definition of slow, contemplative music which is what we are trying to consider in this thread after all. :)

Offline cjb368

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Re: Next Piece
Reply #15 on: November 29, 2020, 05:30:22 PM
 Thanks for all the replies.
I like Bach Air on a G string. It seems it may help me with some skills.
Honestly, my technique is not the best. I struggle with anything that requires any speed. I practice scales etc. for a short time daily, but I'm sure I'm behind with technical ability.
I'm an older guy, and the teacher had suggested that I learn with pieces I like, as long as I keep pushing myself to try more difficult pieces now and then.
Unfortunately, most that I really want to learn, are out of reach for now. There are plenty of nice pieces in the grade 4,5 level that I probably should be looking at.
I will look at the sheets for some of the material you all have suggested and see if it's something I can handle.
Thx again

Offline j_tour

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Re: Next Piece
Reply #16 on: November 29, 2020, 09:54:56 PM
Yeah, I think, probably due to lack of sleep on my part, we got off on a bit of a tangent.

But, just talking about music and performance sort of makes its own gravy!  Very difficult to restrain oneself when it comes to pieces one has been playing for decades.

Yeah, you have a lot of good options.

The Goldberg Aria, some of the Beethoven Op. 126 Bagatelles, the Mozart Fantasía.  The slow movement from Beethoven Op. 27 no. 1 (needs a bit of editing on your part, since it sort of leads directly into the final movement of the sonata, which is great, but not what you're looking for, I don't think).

And the Ab slow movement from Beethoven's Pathétique:  it seems the consensus is that you can play it, although it *will* need some bits of attention IMHO.  I personally think it would be worthwhile for you, despite some small challenges for you to work on.  Mostl;y IMHO playing the melody and accompaniment in the same hand(s) while still being perfectly clear about the rhythm.  You might have to do some metronome work, but you can play that, certainly, if you can play all of the Für Élise "bagatelle."

A teacher would be a great help for that one, but, it will certainly take your ability a bit forward, and you might find yourself playing the whole sonata, if you like.  IMHO, if you can play the slow movement, then there's nothing else in the rest of the sonata you cannot do.  With a bit of effort, of course, and it doesn't seem it would interest you.

It's hardly starting at the most elementary Beethoven, but if you manage it, that should, IME, open quite a few doors for you to dealing with technically similar pieces from Beethoven's sonatas.  As well as a good bit of more general classical-era repertoire.

For a few examples, the theme from Beethoven's Op. 111 variations (you can look at the rest but....you'll see it's probably best not to touch), at a minimum the theme from the first movement from LvB's Op. 26, and at least a few of the variations....the list is endless, really.

ETA And as mentioned above, the Op. 10 no 3 from Beethoven:  yeah.  That might appeal to you.  You can play that specific movement, or, as well, the whole sonata if you like.  Certainly something for an aspiring pianist to be aware of.

And the various smaller pieces from Debussy.  Yes, including "La fille aux cheveux de lin."  And, of course, the infamous "Jimbo's Lullaby."  Among others.

You have lots of good options, And, yes, if you can put in the work, or perhaps you have "the knack," I wouldn't completely put Clair de lune of Debussy off the table.  You should look at the rest of the « Suite bergamesque » to put it in perspective (some of those make that movement look like a cakewalk!  Not very easy at all, as a suite, compared to just the one movement or part).  IMHO it's not terribly difficult, provided you can do some basic 2:3 melodic work (in thirds, in the RH, if I remember right) and handle the arpeggios.  You might be frustrated, but then again, you might not.  It's not what I would call a difficult piece, mechanically nor musically, but I couldn't make an informed decision for you.

Oh, if you want to attempt to convince someone to dance the tango to something very nice and very different, you can play the "Solace" of Scott Joplin.

Not classical, of course, but I think most anybody should be able to read that off the page.  Yeah, there are some spots that take a little bit of looking at, but arguably much closer to classical-era music than Debussy, much as I love Debussy's music.

EETA Honestly, the biggest help for you at this point in your life as a musician is to become an excellent sight-reader:  really the only way to decide for yourself and narrow down the choices.  Just play a bunch of, even just the suggestions here.  Perhaps at the keyboard, or perhaps not.
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Offline pianowhisper

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Re: Next Piece
Reply #17 on: November 30, 2020, 12:58:34 PM
Yeah, I think, probably due to lack of sleep on my part, we got off on a bit of a tangent.
But, just talking about music and performance sort of makes its own gravy!  Very difficult to restrain oneself when it comes to pieces one has been playing for decades.
I'd just like to add that all this discussion, even if it kinda ended up off on a tangent, IMO is very positive for both the OP and the replyers and it brings back to memory the time PianoStreet was much more alive with topics and replies. (It is unfortunate to see so many interesting threads being forgotten and not many people sharing their ideas.)

Wishing very good luck to the OP. :)
Cheers,
pw
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