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Andras Schiff, Brahms and the Question of Tradition
Much attention and mention is given Sir Andras Schiff's latest remarkable recording of both Brahmsí piano concertos with the Orchestra of the Age of Enlightenment. Schiff's choice of instrument is a BlŁthner grand piano built in Leipzig around 1859, the year in which the first D minor concerto was premiered. Schiff has changed foot in his views on period instruments and the recording can be seen as an ambitious attempt to scrutinize and fully bring out the true characteristics of Brahms' works. Read more >>

Topic: Classical sonata for university entrance exam  (Read 708 times)

Offline ialbertovich

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Classical sonata for university entrance exam
on: February 08, 2021, 04:39:34 PM
Hi, I will be applying to university for piano and one requirement for the entrance exam is to play one slow and one fast movement of a classical sonata. I was thinking of playing 2nd and 4th movement of Beethoven's Sonata No.1 in F Minor or 2nd and 3rd movement of Haydn's Piano Sonata in e, No.53, Hob.XVI/34. Would one of these be a better choice than the other?

Offline ivorycherry

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Re: Classical sonata for university entrance exam
Reply #1 on: February 08, 2021, 05:04:36 PM
I generally like the Beethoven a lot more and think itís a better choice(mostly because I played all four movements). I think itís a better choice plus the 4th movement is really cool. Also I really donít like Haydn so itís kinda personal. Just an opinion but not really any advice you should follow.

Online brogers70

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Re: Classical sonata for university entrance exam
Reply #2 on: February 08, 2021, 05:37:24 PM
I love both those sonatas, but I think the Beethoven is more impressive if you can play it confidently.

Offline anacrusis

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Re: Classical sonata for university entrance exam
Reply #3 on: February 08, 2021, 11:27:08 PM
Of the slow movements, I think the Haydn is possibl a richer piece of music, but harder to pull off well. And of the fast movements, the Beethoven is more exciting if you can play that one with appropriate gusto!

Keep in mind that juries at universities hear tons of pianists with fabulous techniques at auditions, so what probably will impress them more is if you can do something moving/exciting/interesting/of a high musical quality with whatever repertoire you select. So I would advice you to pick something that suits your temperament/musical strengths.
 

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