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The Hidden Theme in Schumann's Kinderszenen (Read 309 times)

Offline fredviner

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The Hidden Theme in Schumann's Kinderszenen
« on: July 29, 2021, 07:26:11 AM »
Hi everyone, hope you're well. Very excited to share my latest video on the hidden theme in Schumann's Kinderszenen. Would love to hear what you all think - there's a lot to dispute with this one!


Sheet music to download and print: Kinderszenen by Schumann



Offline lelle

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Re: The Hidden Theme in Schumann's Kinderszenen
«Reply #1 on: July 29, 2021, 08:24:02 AM »
I didn't have any expectations when I clicked but I thought the video was great!

I would agree that most of the motivic connections are probably intentional. The composers of the time were, after all, expert craftsmen, and motivic connections or basing a big work on one basic motif were often used to create a large qauntity of varied material while keeping a sense of unity. That descending fourth being everywhere is not just a coincidence.

The only thing I think one can argue about regarding this is just details about exactly where the rising sixth and descending fourth are hidden in some instances.  :P

EDIT: Regarding motivic connections - Beethoven was big on those and learned it from Haydn, and Schumann would have studied and admired Beethoven's work.


Offline nightwindsonata

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Re: The Hidden Theme in Schumann's Kinderszenen
«Reply #2 on: July 29, 2021, 05:25:14 PM »
Good work! I agree with your assertion, these kinds of motivic and structural interrelations are often central to the conception of unified bodies of work like the Kinderszenen. You should look at the late Brahms piano pieces if you haven't already. They're so tightly composed that I'm sure there are some interconnections between pieces.
Program:
Rachmaninoff Cello Sonata
Bach Prelude and Fugue in A flat
Beethoven The Hunt Sonata
Brahms Op. 119
Florence Price Clouds

Offline fredviner

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Re: The Hidden Theme in Schumann's Kinderszenen
«Reply #3 on: July 30, 2021, 07:28:15 AM »
I didn't have any expectations when I clicked but I thought the video was great!

I would agree that most of the motivic connections are probably intentional. The composers of the time were, after all, expert craftsmen, and motivic connections or basing a big work on one basic motif were often used to create a large qauntity of varied material while keeping a sense of unity. That descending fourth being everywhere is not just a coincidence.

The only thing I think one can argue about regarding this is just details about exactly where the rising sixth and descending fourth are hidden in some instances.  :P

EDIT: Regarding motivic connections - Beethoven was big on those and learned it from Haydn, and Schumann would have studied and admired Beethoven's work.

Thank you so much! Very pleased you enjoyed it :)

I'm inclined to agree - I think the fact that he wrote these works in such a short space of time meant these thematic ingredients and melodic shapes were likely whirling around his head during the compositional process, either consciously or not.

You'd be welcome to share your comment on the video itself - I'm hoping to spark more debate in the YT comments of my videos :D

Offline fredviner

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Re: The Hidden Theme in Schumann's Kinderszenen
«Reply #4 on: July 30, 2021, 07:28:56 AM »
Good work! I agree with your assertion, these kinds of motivic and structural interrelations are often central to the conception of unified bodies of work like the Kinderszenen. You should look at the late Brahms piano pieces if you haven't already. They're so tightly composed that I'm sure there are some interconnections between pieces.

Thank you! :)

I adore the late Brahms piano pieces - any in particular you had in mind?

Offline nightwindsonata

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Re: The Hidden Theme in Schumann's Kinderszenen
«Reply #5 on: August 01, 2021, 09:51:44 PM »
Thank you! :)

I adore the late Brahms piano pieces - any in particular you had in mind?

Well I would like to hear your take on the Op. 119, since I'm studying them at the moment!
Program:
Rachmaninoff Cello Sonata
Bach Prelude and Fugue in A flat
Beethoven The Hunt Sonata
Brahms Op. 119
Florence Price Clouds