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Topic: My First Polonaise  (Read 850 times)

Offline glerzhus

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My First Polonaise
on: June 15, 2023, 07:28:51 PM
i'm currently working on chopin's barcarolle(my hardest piece yet but it's going fairly well i would say(?)  :P ) and am planning on doing my first polonaise next.  i was curious what your favorite to listen to/most fun to play would be.  i'm a bit stuck on the op. 44 and op. 22 ones.  the op. 61 i love a lot but seems a bit too hard(?) and i'm not really interested in the op. 53.

also if anyone has some neat links for learning about the history/structure of a polonaise that would be fun as well  :) thank you!

Offline anacrusis

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Re: My First Polonaise
Reply #1 on: June 15, 2023, 08:15:45 PM
I really like the op 44 polonaise, it's a lot of fun to play if you like to play chords and octaves and being in the drivers seat of cascade of fiery, tumultuous, angry sounds :)

Offline quantum

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Re: My First Polonaise
Reply #2 on: June 15, 2023, 10:47:01 PM
I'd suggest going on Youtube and searching for videos of traditional polonaise dances.  It will give you an idea of the general characteristics of the dance.

The polonaise characteristics of Op 44 and 61 are mixed in with elements of concert/recital music, so it is helpful recognize a polonaise element when it surfaces. 
Made a Liszt. Need new Handel's for Soler panel & Alkan foil. Will Faure Stein on the way to pick up Mendels' sohn. Josquin get Wolfgangs Schu with Clara. Gone Chopin, I'll be Bach

Offline glerzhus

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Re: My First Polonaise
Reply #3 on: June 15, 2023, 11:04:17 PM
I'd suggest going on Youtube and searching for videos of traditional polonaise dances.
Will do  :)

i also found this analysis on 44
which was very interesting.  highly recommend his videos if even only just for his enthusiasm towards the music  ;D

Online lelle

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Re: My First Polonaise
Reply #4 on: June 16, 2023, 12:37:36 PM
Another vote for the Op 44 polonaise here, I love that piece! (plus I don't care much for Op 22 ;))

One simple thing that's good to know about the polonaise is that the 8th note followed by two 16th notes rhythm that appears everywhere needs to be played as if the 8th note is more like a dotted 8th note, and the 16ths much faster, so the rhythm becomes much sharper than what it actually says in the score.

Also regarding Op 61. It has got a few tricky passages with thirds and some unusual fingerings, but nothing that can't be overcome by good fundamentals and a bit of practice. I would not say it's a huge leap in difficulty over Op 44. Musically, however, it is a very difficult piece. It is very well structured, but can sound like a bunch of randomly improvised elements thrown together, if the pianist doesn't understand their character and purpose in the overall form and cannot hold them together in a convincing and emotionally touching narrative.

Offline glerzhus

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Re: My First Polonaise
Reply #5 on: June 16, 2023, 12:54:28 PM
yeah i'm feeling like op. 44 is going to be the pick.  my only concern is driving my neighbors nuts when i practice the part where he is hammering the keys for 2 minutes before the middle section  ;D

thanks a lot for the tip on the rhythm, appreciate that  :)

Offline bwl_13

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Re: My First Polonaise
Reply #6 on: June 16, 2023, 09:51:10 PM
I'd do Op. 44 and depending how much other stuff you're playing and how your technique is developing, maybe taking a crack at the Polonaise-Fantasie? That is definitely one of those pieces that you have to absolutely adore before attempting though, it's too hard to play if you don't love it (which I do).
Second Year Undergrad:
Bach BWV 914
Beethoven Op. 58
Reger Op. 24 No. 5
Rachmaninoff Op. 39 No. 3 & No. 5

Offline glerzhus

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Re: My First Polonaise
Reply #7 on: June 17, 2023, 01:37:44 AM
yeah i definitely wouldn't mind trying out the op. 61 to see if i can handle it, not a bad idea  ;) if you or anyone knows some particularly tough parts in the polonaise-fantasy, i'll focus on those to see. appreciate the help  :)

Offline glerzhus

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Re: My First Polonaise
Reply #8 on: June 17, 2023, 03:42:09 PM
answered my own question by finding this thread on here if anyone else is curious, here ya go  :P
https://www.pianostreet.com/smf/index.php?topic=63884.0#:~:text=Technically%2C%20I%20found%20the%20first,the%20key%20change%20to%20Ab).
if anyone else has anything else to add that's not on that link feel free though

Offline anacrusis

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Re: My First Polonaise
Reply #9 on: June 17, 2023, 05:43:13 PM
The toughest spots I can think of off the top of my head are the thirds that come early on, the sixteenth note passages that start around a page before the slow section in B major, and the final 3 pages from where the theme comes back in forte with cordal accompaniment. There may be some other double note stuff but honestly it's not that difficult if you just practice.

Offline glerzhus

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Re: My First Polonaise
Reply #10 on: June 18, 2023, 02:50:32 AM
thanks for the extra notes  :) excited for my book to get here now so i can get to work
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