Piano Forum



Enfant Terrible or Childishly Innocent? – Prokofiev’s Complete Piano Works Now on Piano Street
In our ongoing quest to provide you with a complete library of classical piano sheet music, the works of Sergey Prokofiev have been our most recent focus. As one of the most distinctive and original musical voices from the first half of the 20th century, Prokofiev has an obvious spot on the list of top piano composers. Welcome to the intense, humorous, and lyrical universe of his complete Sonatas, Concertos, character pieces, and transcriptions! Read more >>

Topic: Chopin nocturne  (Read 1710 times)

Offline jono

  • PS Silver Member
  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 28
Chopin nocturne
on: February 28, 2005, 09:36:21 PM
Hi
How difficult would you say that chopin's nocturne op. 9 nr. 1 is, compared to other of his nocturnes? And do you think it is overplayed? How overplayed?
Thanks  /Jono
Listening to Debussy is like having a midnight bath in a lukewarm augustlake

Offline Rockitman

  • PS Silver Member
  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 83
Re: Chopin nocturne
Reply #1 on: February 28, 2005, 09:47:39 PM
I'm currently working on this one.  I'm not an advanced player so have not tackled the bulk of his nocturnes yet.   I do have 4 others in the bag and this one is maybe a bit trickier than them.  (9-2,  72-1, 15-3 and Posthumous).  At first I was daunted by the right hand runs against the walking left hand eighthnotes on the first and last page, but as they say, practice makes perfect, and it is getting much easier.  That, really, is the only technical difficulty of the piece that I can see.  The very beautiful middle movement with the right hand octaves is really quite easy and repetitive. 

Offline SteinwayTony

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 531
Re: Chopin nocturne
Reply #2 on: February 28, 2005, 09:59:11 PM
The right hand runs against the more constant left hand part is one of my favorite aspects of the nocturnes.  When the notes and rhythm in the left hand is solid, the right hand comes somewhat naturally (though this is not to underestimate decent fingering andmeticulous phrasing).

Offline dinosaurtales

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1138
Re: Chopin nocturne
Reply #3 on: February 28, 2005, 11:26:24 PM
I'm currently working on this one.  I'm not an advanced player so have not tackled the bulk of his nocturnes yet.   I do have 4 others in the bag and this one is maybe a bit trickier than them.  (9-2,  72-1, 15-3 and Posthumous).  At first I was daunted by the right hand runs against the walking left hand eighthnotes on the first and last page, but as they say, practice makes perfect, and it is getting much easier.  That, really, is the only technical difficulty of the piece that I can see.  The very beautiful middle movement with the right hand octaves is really quite easy and repetitive. 

Boy!  You guys have bigger hands than me!  i had to give up on this one BECAUSE of that middle section.  Right hand octaves are killers for me, and I had trouble "walking" them appropriately withoiut killing my forearm and wrist.
So much music, so little time........

Offline Rockitman

  • PS Silver Member
  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 83
Re: Chopin nocturne
Reply #4 on: March 01, 2005, 12:14:34 AM
Dinosaursan,  you must focus on relaxation.   Much too much tension Dinosaursan. 
You get to use sustain pedal throughout also, so don't fret too much on "walking the octaves".  Hit em all with 1-5 if you have to.   Feel the relaxation of this movement,  it's like a lullaby.   

Offline dinosaurtales

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1138
Re: Chopin nocturne
Reply #5 on: March 01, 2005, 12:38:40 AM
ah, Rokitmansan.  My teacher is EVIL and MAKES me do these vile things.  I attempted the zen approach to the nocturne and was raked over the coals. 

She is now making me work on a Ballade just to put me in my "place"
So much music, so little time........

Offline Rockitman

  • PS Silver Member
  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 83
Re: Chopin nocturne
Reply #6 on: March 01, 2005, 02:12:55 AM
Piano teachers are like dominatrixes.   They both bring you pain and you pay for it to boot!   But they both know what's good for you, you bad bad boy you.
I just hope for your sake the ballade isn't the Ballade of Davey Crockett.

Daveyyyyyy, Davey Crocket, king of the wild frontierrrrr. 

Just think, when you master that one, you can say "I kilt that baar with ma bare hands!"

Remember Dinosaursan,  wax on wax off.

Offline allchopin

  • PS Silver Member
  • Sr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 1171
Re: Chopin nocturne
Reply #7 on: March 01, 2005, 02:28:22 AM
Jono,
From my impressions only, this nocturne is played enough because it is the first of the set and thus a good starting point, but I feel that it is relatively underplayed.  More often played is the Db, C minor (Op. 48), the posthumous', #2 in Eb, and E minor.  I would say that this is the easiest nocturne next to the E minor and posthumous C minor.  It was my first  :)
A modern house without a flush toilet... uncanny.

Offline rodrk352

  • PS Silver Member
  • Jr. Member
  • ***
  • Posts: 35
Re: Chopin nocturne
Reply #8 on: March 02, 2005, 04:42:59 AM
    The melodies in Opus 9 No. 1 sound like a Venetian gondola song. The first theme is very tender and restrained, but the piece really takes wing in the second section, an impassioned declaration of love under the moonlight. The women must have swooned when Chopin first played this one.
     This piece is dedicated to the pianist Camille Moke Pleyel. She is the woman who was engaged to the composer Hector Berlioz. While he was staying in Italy (he had won the Prix de Rome) she met the successful manufacturer of pianos, Pleyel. With her mother's approval, she dumped the penniless Berlioz and decided to marry Pleyel instead. This caused Berlioz to snap, and he returned to France in a rage with the intention of a double murder/suicide.         
     Fortunately, he came back to his senses and went on to finish the score to the "Symphonie Fantastique."     
For more information about this topic, click search below!
 

Logo light pianostreet.com - the website for classical pianists, piano teachers, students and piano music enthusiasts.

Subscribe for unlimited access

Sign up

Follow us

Piano Street Digicert