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Topic: "the Pianist"  (Read 2043 times)

Offline ponecorleone

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"the Pianist"
on: March 01, 2005, 04:09:23 PM
 i just saw the film "the pianist" and i thought it was brilliant, whats the piece at the end called, chopin waltz?
what do you think of the piano playing?

Offline SteinwayTony

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Re: "the Pianist"
Reply #1 on: March 01, 2005, 04:11:16 PM
At the very end?  With the orchestra?  That's the Polonaise from the Andante Spianato and Grande Polonaise, Op. 22.  It is a beautiful piece indeed, but man, talk about random things to orchestrate.

Brody took a crash course because Polanski insisted that the actor play.  I've heard the first Ballade played much better, but you have to hand it Brody for learning it so quickly (and playing it at a below-freezing temperature).

Offline ponecorleone

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Re: "the Pianist"
Reply #2 on: March 01, 2005, 04:17:27 PM
yes, i didnt think it was a real orchestra piece. i hate playin in the cold but now i have some good exercises to get rid of that. i seem to find that all the pieces i really want to leaern, with a few exeptions are chopin.  think i should learn some other composers?

Offline SteinwayTony

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Re: "the Pianist"
Reply #3 on: March 01, 2005, 04:23:33 PM
No, you got confused:

The piece he plays in the house for the Nazi officer is the first Ballade in G minor, Op. 23.

The piece he plays with the orchestra at the end is the Polonaise.  And it is, indeed, a "real" piece for piano and orchestra.

Definitely try some other composers.  If you like Chopin, chances are you'll like the Brahms piano pieces in the later opus numbers (76, 116, 118, 119), or maybe some Schumann.  Rachmaninoff's shorter works (op. 3) may interest you as well.  If you're feeling adventurous (and a tad suicidal), check out the Brahms sonatas.

Offline chopiabin

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Re: "the Pianist"
Reply #4 on: March 01, 2005, 04:37:00 PM
You're telling me that Brody is the one who played the Ballade? Why don't they ever show his face and hands at the same time? They always show either hands or face, but not both!! And if he took a "crash course" and is able to learn the first Ballade, then find me that teacher right NOW!!!!!!!!

Offline jas

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Re: "the Pianist"
Reply #5 on: March 01, 2005, 06:51:19 PM
You're telling me that Brody is the one who played the Ballade? Why don't they ever show his face and hands at the same time? They always show either hands or face, but not both!! And if he took a "crash course" and is able to learn the first Ballade, then find me that teacher right NOW!!!!!!!!
He didn't. I checked the end credits because I was thinking the same thing! It gives a pianist's name, anyway. If Brody had really played it they'd probably have included some shots where you can actually see that it's him playing, as a way of saying, "Hey! Look, it's really him!" like they did with the Nocturne at the beginning. But you're right -- it cuts between his face and hands, which seems pretty conclusive to me.
And from a practical point of view, I just don't think a complete non-pianist would be capable of it. The presto con fuoco bit was fast even by usual standards (at least, the ones I've heard).

Jas

Offline SteinwayTony

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Re: "the Pianist"
Reply #6 on: March 01, 2005, 08:40:57 PM

 He didn't. I checked the end credits because I was thinking the same thing! It gives a pianist's name, anyway.

That's because Brody didn't play the Grande Polonaise; some Polish guy did.

Offline Alfonso Van Worden

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Re: "the Pianist"
Reply #7 on: March 01, 2005, 09:05:21 PM
If you liked the Andante Spianato you should(or MUST) get Horowitz´s recording , along with Michelangeli´s recording I think you´re going to enjoy them. (Trust me).
Music should not be "Ur-text" , it should be "Ur-spirit"            
                                         -Dinu Lipatti

Offline galonia

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Re: "the Pianist"
Reply #8 on: March 02, 2005, 11:13:24 AM
Brody took a crash course because Polanski insisted that the actor play. I've heard the first Ballade played much better, but you have to hand it Brody for learning it so quickly (and playing it at a below-freezing temperature).

Brody didn't play, but it's true he took piano lessons because Polanski felt he would look more authentic at the piano if he had actually had some lessons.

Offline pianowelsh

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Re: "the Pianist"
Reply #9 on: March 04, 2005, 12:22:45 PM
Think the nocturne in C# was played by Spielmann ( a historical performance)?! and the others by a contemporary polish guy i forget who

Offline SteinwayTony

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Re: "the Pianist"
Reply #10 on: March 04, 2005, 03:01:37 PM
Think the nocturne in C# was played by Spielmann ( a historical performance)?! and the others by a contemporary polish guy i forget who

Szpilman didn't play in the movie at all.  On the official soundtrack he plays an A minor mazurka, of which the sound quality is terrible. 
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