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Jeux D'eau (Read 2462 times)

Offline SteveK

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Jeux D'eau
« on: May 10, 2003, 06:06:45 PM »
I just joined soundclick.com and added Ravel's Jeux d'eau to it; you can download mp3's here! Though I am still working on the piece, I recorded it on a Steinway (9 foot) from 1893. http://www.soundclick.com/bands/2/stephenkoppmusic.htm
How do you like the sound of the piano??? It belongs to an old gentleman who lives near by; he told me I can use his piano whenever I want!
"And you probably thought I'd play badly?" - Sergei Rachmaninoff.

Offline SteveK

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Re: Jeux D'eau
«Reply #1 on: May 10, 2003, 06:17:34 PM »
Oh I almost forgot! I'm also going to add Chopin's Polonaise op. 53 and and his Scherzo no. 2, op. 31! Unfortunately I don't have time now because--- I'M TOO BUSY!!!!! :o ;D

Take care everyone,
Stephen
"And you probably thought I'd play badly?" - Sergei Rachmaninoff.

Offline steinway23

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Re: Jeux D'eau
«Reply #2 on: May 13, 2003, 04:50:20 AM »
hi stephen,
im currently learning the ravel jeux deau as well. I have gotten most of the notes already but executing the piece never seems a secure thing for me like how you will play a beethoven sonata. Maybe its impressionistic music; i dont know. Could you recommend me a good way of practising this piece how do i work on bar 6 and bar 38 to 47? thanks...
a detailed description will be helpful.

Offline SteveK

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Re: Jeux D'eau
«Reply #3 on: May 13, 2003, 04:56:45 PM »
In bar 6, the scales that you see are whole-tone scales. The last scale is very fast, so you can take a little bit of time there.
From bars 38-47, your right hand at the top note should sound, but also the 32nd notes very even. You can see at the top where it says "le chant un peu en dehors". Therefore the top notes in the right hand should be heard more. Also make sure that when playing both hands, the rhythm should be very precise.
"And you probably thought I'd play badly?" - Sergei Rachmaninoff.

Offline steinway23

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Re: Jeux D'eau
«Reply #4 on: May 19, 2003, 07:50:59 AM »
Hi steph, thanks for writing back.
my teacher assigned this piece to me. I often wondered what is the exact proper way to practise this piece because it really isnt easy.

could you share with me how you started off with this piece and what was the approach you adopted to learn and practise this piece? thanks a million

Offline SteveK

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Re: Jeux D'eau
«Reply #5 on: May 19, 2003, 09:36:02 PM »
The reason I started playing Jeux d'eau is that my teacher suggested I play it. Here how I practice: When I have trouble with some segments of this piece, I regroup. You can find different ways to prepare your fingers ahead when jumping, crossing your finger over your thumb, closing your hand, etc. As you play this piece, you can picture in your mind waves of waters.
Have a great day,
Stephen.
"And you probably thought I'd play badly?" - Sergei Rachmaninoff.

Offline eddie92099

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Re: Jeux D'eau
«Reply #6 on: August 03, 2003, 06:29:54 AM »
Try listening to Martha Argerich's recording, it is inspirational. Also listen to Le jeux d'eau a ville d'este by Liszt, which Ravel's Jeux d'eau  is based on,
Ed

Offline Ktari

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Re: Jeux D'eau
«Reply #7 on: August 03, 2003, 07:14:35 AM »
Actually, Ravel did NOT base his piece on Liszt's -there are significance differences that suggest this (I did a research paper on Ravel) they just happen to have the same theme. That's like saying, because... oops. It's so late at night, I can't even think of any examples!!! But here goes, generally: just because some medieval dude wrote a song about, say, castles, and then some romantic dude did, you can't really say the second composer BASED it on the first...

sorry for the rant, hehe, I fell in love with Ravel while writing the paper

btw, for Jeux d'Eau, I didn't have too many problems learning it, so I'm not sure: technically, get all the notes first (choose a measure and start counting staff lines and sharps #) and then get that grounding first. For me, I had the most problems with the rubato/timing of things (you'll notice the recordings out there differ wildly in length) -experiment with this, but most importantly, keep it flowing, don't let it get choppy or too slow. Then when you have the technical base, start adding imagery -what is happening at a certain time? can you work in some contrast? that was the funnest..er most fun, part for me ^^
~Ktari

Offline eddie92099

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Re: Jeux D'eau
«Reply #8 on: August 04, 2003, 09:20:43 AM »
Sorry I must not have explained myself clearly enough. I didn't mean Ravel based it on the Liszt like for example Grieg's Piano Concerto on Schumann's! What I meant is the Liszt provided an inspiration for Ravel's,
Ed

Offline ignaceii

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Re: Jeux D'eau
«Reply #9 on: February 28, 2014, 09:05:09 PM »
I worked on it to for a wile, but didn't know how to tackle certain passages. I find it very difficult.
It asks for a good teacher, and as I don't have one, I try it myself.
But I had to leave it, it's pretty long to.
I stepped back to the sonatine. Not to be underestimated to. French music overall is not easy.
Stylistic German and French music are 2 completely different worlds.