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Topic: Advice (diploma recital repertoire)  (Read 2531 times)

Offline Dave_2004_G

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Advice (diploma recital repertoire)
on: December 15, 2003, 09:15:22 PM
Hey,

I was just wandering if anyone had anythoughts on possible programme for a recital diploma (equivalent to dipABRSM standard - dunno the US equivalent but it's a professional qualification!)...I think I've decided upon Pathetique for the Beethoven sonata (I could have put waldstein in but I thought it unwise - it's quite a long way above the standard of piece required), but I need another piece/collection of pieces lasting between 10-15 minutes...my teacher recommended some Brahms, and she said I should play something to improve my touch/tone - so something slow/beautiful to contrast the intensity of the pathetique....any thoughts?

Dave

Offline eddie92099

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Re: Advice
Reply #1 on: December 16, 2003, 12:43:04 AM
Shall we recommend pieces from the actual DipABRSM list?
Ed

Offline shatteringpulse

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Re: Advice
Reply #2 on: December 16, 2003, 02:58:59 AM
That, of course, depends on just HOW intense you plan on playing Pathetique!  ;)

10-15 mins more of music contrasting to Pathetique...hmmm...perhaps...

Rachmaninoff: Op. 23, No. 4 in D (This is one of the most romantic of all Rach's preludes; it will indeed display your tone--defined as whether or not you can capture the attention of the girls in the audience--as well as your mastery of the sensuous, slow triple layered over duple meter! It's also the next white key up from C minor!)

Chopin: Nocturne, Op. 9, No. 2 (E-flat is a 3rd up from C Minor--how very flowing! This nocturne lays bare how softly you can play miniature leaps of chords--and just how much ornamentation you can take!)

Liebstraum No. 3 (I'm sure Ed will enjoy the fact that Liszt is once again being mentioned! I think this competes with any of the Chopin nocturnes--anyday!)

Or you might do Funerailles by Liszt--an epic tone poem from darkness to romance to death again...it gets as intense as Pathetique, depending on how it's played, but the tone is definitely showcased!

The Schubert G-flat impomprtu!

You could also turn to Debussy--Claire de Lune, however hackneyed, can become quite refreshing--as well as "des pas sur la neige," "voiles," "la catehdral egloutie," and--"Ondine!" from books I and II

Even Rachmaninoff's G Minor prelude from op. 23 (no. 5) has one of the most gorgeous melodies in the middle that displays your ability to manage widespread arpeggios with beautiful tone in the upper register--and those darned midlde voices!

All of this is about the same level as Pathetique (Since you didn't want stuff at Waldstein's level, I assume...)

--Shattering Pulse

Offline chopiabin

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Re: Advice
Reply #3 on: December 16, 2003, 04:25:22 AM
What about a Scriabin etude (one of the slower ones)? They will really show off voicing technique AND singing tone.

Or try Chopin's nocturne in C minor, op.48, #1. It starts out relatively spare, with a beautiful singing melody in the upper register, then shows off glissando technique, chromatic octave technique, and then voicing technique in a really intense doppio movimiento. A great showpiece both technically and emotionally!

Chop

Offline Dave_2004_G

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Re: Advice
Reply #4 on: December 16, 2003, 08:50:18 PM
Thanks guys - these seem like really good suggestions, I'll have to go off and listen to some/get music!  Co-incidentally, my teacher had also recommended the rach gm prelude, but I'm not particularly fond of it aside from the middle bit - VERY rachmaninoff!

Ed - the pieces don't necesarily have to be on the DipABRSM list, since I'm going to be sitting a different exam of similar standard.

Shatteringpulse - thank you very much for those suggestions, there are quite a few of them I'm gunna have my work cut out listening to those, I'm sure it will be a pleasure though!  I've played the chopin eb nocturne no2, it's gorgeous but not sure if it's of the right level (the fact that it is alot harder to play well than alot more difficult pieces technically is another story!)...You were correct to assume I wasn't looking for anything around the level of the waldstein, I played it as a piece to push and improve my technique - I may perform it in a seperate recital at school since I think it will be a valuable performance, and it's not like I can play it but it's just not ready for performance in an exam - far too risky and I just can't play it quite well enough!

Chop - thanks as well, I have the music for the Chopin so I'll have a play!

One other suggestion I had from my teacher was Chopin's 3rd Ballade (along then with another shorter piece). I've always loved the first but it's VERY difficult and I think unsuitable with the Pathetique - how would you say the  third compares difficulty wise?  It's still a beautiful piece!

Dave

Offline Dave_2004_G

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Re: Advice
Reply #5 on: December 16, 2003, 09:15:00 PM
Well I've just had a though - perhaps something in a key such as Gb major or eb major would be a good idea - the patetique hints at alot of modulations to such keys (mostly db), and seems to be not like a battle between good and evil (how horribly cheesy!) but does indeed display well the juxtaposition between the turmoil in Beethoven's life and the beauty which he saw around him - even in the Grave there are hints at serenity, and everybody knows the second movement!  

Anyway in the end the home key of c minor and turmoil and storm seems to win through - perhaps something like the schubert gb impromptu would be a good combination (I've just listened to it by the way and it's beautiful!), ending this time in a 'serene' key as it were after going through the minor key in the middle

Appropriate do you think?  A recital based (sort of) around light and dark?  You do get marks for programming....

Dave

Offline shatteringpulse

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Re: Advice (diploma recital repertoire)
Reply #6 on: December 16, 2003, 10:44:07 PM
I did a post on the ultimate light/dark program, it's in the "ultimate 75 min program" post if you want to check it out.

Remember, if you are programming, you have to balance the light and dark--you can't have "moderate" darkness with "blazing" light or "abyssal" darkness with "moderate" light--so I think you are on the right track with the Impromptu,it's just about right--

On the Chopin Ballades, you are correct when you assume that they do not flow well with Pathetique. And if you are going to expend the effort to learn one of them, make it the Gm or the Fm--haha--but that, of course, is just an opinion.
--Shattering Pulse
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