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Topic: Why the emphasis on recognition?  (Read 1080 times)

Offline journeyyourmind

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Why the emphasis on recognition?
on: June 08, 2006, 05:41:21 AM
It seems that there are many musicians on this forum and others(and in the music community period) that seem to only play their instrument because they consider themselves good or technically superior to most. There seems to be such a focus on whether or not you will make as a concert pianist and that if you don't become uber famous, or don't play "better" than everyone else that you have somehow failed or not achieved what you want.
    I myself think that if one could persue music in anyway at all, whether that is performing, teaching, composing, conducting etc. that one is extremely lucky to be able to do music for a living as opposed to some other tedious work. I know many many musicians who make more than enough money to pay the rent and buy their goods who are not extremly famous or widely recognized, but who simply enjoy their lifestlye that they are so privelaged to have. This is what it's all about isn't it? 
   It definitely takes hard work, but anyone who really wants to, and has musical talent, is perfectly capable of dedicating a large portion of their life to music and still be able to live comfortably, have a family etc. It just becomes frustrating when such a large amount of musicians lose sight of what they really love and focus so much on being better than others. It sure is nice to be considered gifted/technically superior, but it is nicer to be able to follow your passion.
   Anyways...I just had to let out some words that hopefully got through to some people. I personally have wondered the topic myself, and have realized that I am very lucky just for the experiences I've had and know that I will have. Remember, you ARE special just to be a musician, it is all about your own endeavor, not the opinion of others or the prestige you can get.

Offline gyzzzmo

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Re: Why the emphasis on recognition?
Reply #1 on: June 08, 2006, 06:05:41 AM
probably same as with any job. Recognision makes the change of making more money bigger. And people like it to make more and more money, even if they already got loads.
1+1=11

Offline pianistimo

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Re: Why the emphasis on recognition?
Reply #2 on: June 08, 2006, 11:04:10 AM
it's funny.  when i first went to get a music degree - i majored in performance - but what i really did was mostly teaching when it came to making money.  but, the performance aspects are what keep some of us going.  it's more thrilling.  exciting.  u get adrenaline rush.  it's like mountainclimbing for some.  they freeze their noses and extremities but do it again and again.  that's how it is for some people.

i like having the idea that i can play a whole recital without looking at the music.  not to impress people - but more to impress myself that i can actually do this at my age.  not that age matters - but when u've been doing something a long time (which u love) - u don't want to be just good.  u want to be excellent.

i think if ur a good performer u can also be a good teacher.  but, then again, there have been some very good teachers that don't perform much.  it's all what u personally want.  it's a personal goal.  not something a university makes u want more or less.  whether i take more classes or not will not deter me from playing more professionally. 

making a cd would be just as exciting as performing - probably - but, i WOULD like to play a piano concerto.  no teacher could deter me from that goal.  they'd just be stepped on and walked over.  no one can tell u - don't climb the mountain.  it's too steep.  u might forget ur place in the music and be all embarrassed.  well, at my age - i've already had embarrassement from other things.  i know how to handle it.  i'd just politey say 'can we start again from measure such and such.'  noone cares if ur perfect (unless u charge an arm and a leg).  in which case - i'd play for free just to get the experience.  but, no highschool orchestra for me.  i want the philadelphia orchestra. 

Offline jas

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Re: Why the emphasis on recognition?
Reply #3 on: June 08, 2006, 11:35:14 AM
I'm not interested in becoming a famous pianist, to be honest. It's not that I wouldn't like to, but I'm realistic enough to know it's not going to happen. Too lazy. :) I love playing the piano, and if I start forcing myself to practice lightning-fast thirds, octaves, etc. I'll just stop enjoying it, and I don't want that to happen. I'm competent enough and I'm happy with that. I'm more interested in music history (well, mostly piano history). But I'd have to start wearing tweed and I'm not sure how I feel about that... ;D
 

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