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Kovacevich Plays Opus 111 and Teaches Opus 90

Stephen Kovacevich performs the first movement of Beethoven Piano Sonata No.32 in C minor opus 111 at the La Roque d’Anthéron Festival in 2004. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Rach Prelude in G minor Op. 23  (Read 1044 times)
rach3pianoconcerto
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« on: January 11, 2007, 07:53:57 AM »

hey i am in the process of learning rachmaninoffs second most popular prelude in Gminor opus 23. I am wondering if it is wise to play hands separate first to get to know the notes and where the piece is going before going hands together. I can go super super slow hands together and even doing that i am making plenty of mistakes. I am just wondering how i would approach this piece in a wise way as to not stall the learning process. What is the best way to practice this piece. I just feel like i am not getting anywhere.
Thank you very much

Regards.

-----Mike Grin
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piano sheet music of Prelude
molto-marcato
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« Reply #1 on: January 11, 2007, 09:11:09 AM »

Basically i wouldn't work on a whole piece H.S.. If you encounter a passage that is very difficult it sure can be helpful to practice H.S. . From the score ( i never played this particular prelude yet but a few others) i suggest you concentrate on a few bars, or maybe page one first to get the rythmic figure right. Practicing slowly(even super slow) is a good approach but be sure the section is not to long. In the poco meno mosso part it could be wise to practice left hand seperate. To me it looks that you need some decent pedaling in this part to hold the half notes and not produce a blurry sound. Please post a recording if possible, once you get into it.

Regards
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rach3pianoconcerto
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« Reply #2 on: January 11, 2007, 09:26:29 AM »

Thanks for the advice.  I will do my best  Grin
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rach3pianoconcerto
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« Reply #3 on: January 11, 2007, 10:01:18 AM »

Question about  the first note in bar 4.........F.........Should i land on that note with my thumb so it is easier to play the Bb chord with 3 5 fingers or would landing on that F with the 4 finger be ok?
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molto-marcato
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« Reply #4 on: January 11, 2007, 03:47:49 PM »

Maybe i'd prefer the thump because of the accent. The fourth maybe too weak to give a nice controlled accentuated tone. But for this you would have to make a fast movement, .... i'm sorry, i have to try this at home before i can decide. If you are able to move the thump easily in tempo alla marcia to F (still legato)i would prefer thump over fourth. If you encounter difficulties try the third maybe.
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rach3pianoconcerto
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« Reply #5 on: January 11, 2007, 08:08:58 PM »

I practiced that part up to tempo over and over again last night so the thumb it is. Its just that ever since i read that posting about the certain edited versions i no longer can trust that the fingerings are the most pratical. I am learning from the Baylor Rach` preludes. I heard its a pretty good one  though.

Regards

----rach
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molto-marcato
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« Reply #6 on: January 12, 2007, 10:11:29 AM »

Never trust fingering in any edition. You don't know if your hand and technique fits to the ideas of the editor  Wink.
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