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mozart technique (Read 15675 times)

Offline sonata76

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mozart technique
« on: May 03, 2007, 12:00:14 AM »
hi quick question.would you say ronda alla turca is good for technique?my right forth and fifth fingers are weaker than my left.any help would be appreciated.

Offline shortyshort

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Re: mozart technique
«Reply #1 on: May 03, 2007, 09:44:11 AM »
not sure, but i had fun learning it. I had to learn a lot of new techniques to get it to sound right.
If God really exists, then why haven't I got more fingers?

Offline counterpoint

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Re: mozart technique
«Reply #2 on: May 03, 2007, 09:55:06 AM »
hi quick question.would you say ronda alla turca is good for technique?my right forth and fifth fingers are weaker than my left.any help would be appreciated.

Perhaps they are not weak enough to play this piece...?  ::)
If it doesn't work - try something different!

Offline rc

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Re: mozart technique
«Reply #3 on: May 03, 2007, 06:36:21 PM »
Sure, it uses those fingers...

But you don't need any kind of permission to learn ronda alla turka, you don't need to learn it for the purpose of working specific fingers.  You can learn it because you want to and it's a great piece of music.  You want to play it don't you?

Go for it.  Make sure everything sounds even and proper.  Learn it to your best abilities and hold no regrets.

Offline counterpoint

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Re: mozart technique
«Reply #4 on: May 03, 2007, 07:23:18 PM »
Sure, it uses those fingers...

What I wanted to say: it's very hard to play this and similar pieces with strong fingers!
I know what I say, because I have played quite a long time with strong fingers, and this piece was very, very hard for me. Now I play with relaxed fingers: now it's much easier to play - and it sounds much better.
If it doesn't work - try something different!

Offline rc

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Re: mozart technique
«Reply #5 on: May 04, 2007, 02:43:18 AM »
Oh, I was referring to the OP there...  But I'm glad you clarified, your post was pretty vague - flew right over my head :D

Offline stevetrug

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Re: mozart technique
«Reply #6 on: May 04, 2007, 09:38:37 PM »
What I wanted to say: it's very hard to play this and similar pieces with strong fingers!
I know what I say, because I have played quite a long time with strong fingers, and this piece was very, very hard for me. Now I play with relaxed fingers: now it's much easier to play - and it sounds much better.

I'm just coming to the same realisation. Good to hear someone else had the same challenge with it. Like all Mozart, it's so hard to make it sound really good.

Offline pseudo.naivete

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Re: mozart technique
«Reply #7 on: May 06, 2007, 06:11:04 AM »
Like all Mozart, it's so hard to make it sound really good.

I agree... I memorized this piece but then gave up playing it because I couldn't make justice to the music.
"The kid who swallows the most marbles doesn't grow up to have kids of his own."
--George Carlin

Offline pianowolfi

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Re: mozart technique
«Reply #8 on: May 06, 2007, 08:31:31 AM »
I don't know what you're talking about, I rarely use 4-5 in this piece. For instance I play the beginning 4-3-2-1-3   4-3-2-1-3   4-3-2-1-4-3-2-1-4-3-2-1-3  1-3  123 24 13 24 123 24 13 24    and so on. Ok harpsichordists would probably laugh about this fingering, but I don't care.

Offline amelialw

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Re: mozart technique
«Reply #9 on: May 25, 2007, 06:15:35 PM »
I would'nt say Rondo Alla Turca is that technical, anyway everyone plays it :P try another sonata if u really wanna build up your 5th finger
J.S Bach Italian Concerto,Beethoven Sonata op.2 no.2,Mozart Sonatas K.330&333,Chopin Scherzo no.2,Etude op.10 no.12&Fantasie Impromptu

Offline nightingale11

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Re: mozart technique
«Reply #10 on: May 25, 2007, 08:16:07 PM »
Hi, Sonata76

have a look here:

http://www.pianostreet.com/smf/index.php/topic,17052.msg182714.html#msg182714

and here:

http://pianoforum.net/smf/index.php/topic,2851.msg24984.html#msg24984
(Introduction to romantic pieces how technique is specific to pieces)

Offline priscilla_leen

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Re: mozart technique
«Reply #11 on: June 02, 2012, 04:53:33 PM »
To make the 4th and 5th finger stronger, start not compromising the 2 fingers. Always make sure they stand firm on their fingertips, means when you press down on the finger joints, they won't collapse.

When practising running notes and thrills, play them from knuckles, practise to play from knuckles first. Make sure the palm is in C shape, then by lifting up the fingers high and play loud in the beginning with firm fingertips, until the knuckles can be felt and the pianist feel in total control of the fingers. Don't compromise on this part especially the pianist has weak "bridge". Don't lock up your wrists, if not knuckles won't have strength.

BUT To play running notes smoothly (only later on): don't lift up finger higher than the surface of keyboard, so that the fingers can run.

When playing octaves and chords, the top note must be louder than the bottom note. Keep whole arm relax and free from tension always.

Slowly with a lot of time, conscious and patience, you will be able to overcome. In order to develop a new habit, you have to keep conscious and alert at all times, and practise it slower for fully control.

That's all, wish you all the best luck!

Offline pytheamateur

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Re: mozart technique
«Reply #12 on: June 02, 2012, 09:41:25 PM »
I don't know what you're talking about, I rarely use 4-5 in this piece. For instance I play the beginning 4-3-2-1-3   4-3-2-1-3   4-3-2-1-4-3-2-1-4-3-2-1-3  1-3  123 24 13 24 123 24 13 24    and so on. Ok harpsichordists would probably laugh about this fingering, but I don't care.

I use a similar fingering.  It works well.  I thought it's quite conventional though.
Beethoven - Sonata in C sharp minor, Op 27 No 12
Chopin - Fantasie Impromptu, Nocturn in C sharp minor, Op post
Brahms - Op 118, Nos 2 & 3

Offline pytheamateur

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Re: mozart technique
«Reply #13 on: June 02, 2012, 09:43:20 PM »
I don't know what you're talking about, I rarely use 4-5 in this piece. For instance I play the beginning 4-3-2-1-3   4-3-2-1-3   4-3-2-1-4-3-2-1-4-3-2-1-3  1-3  123 24 13 24 123 24 13 24    and so on. Ok harpsichordists would probably laugh about this fingering, but I don't care.
Beethoven - Sonata in C sharp minor, Op 27 No 12
Chopin - Fantasie Impromptu, Nocturn in C sharp minor, Op post
Brahms - Op 118, Nos 2 & 3