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Author Topic: Listening to piano works by Bach while studying maths  (Read 12907 times)
presto agitato
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« on: October 03, 2008, 04:07:44 AM »

In your opinion which work by Bach could be a good option while i study maths.

English Suites, Partitas, Goldberg Variations??

Thanks

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rob47
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« Reply #1 on: October 03, 2008, 04:58:44 AM »

Alexis Weissenberg's bach partitas are so good that your 'maths' will suffer if you study while listening .

 I recommend studying maths while listening to Ludacris or Jigga instead
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kard
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« Reply #2 on: October 05, 2008, 02:22:54 PM »

 
Alexis Weissenberg's bach partitas are so good that your 'maths' will suffer if you study while listening .

 I recommend studying maths while listening to Ludacris or Jigga instead

 Grin 
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db05
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« Reply #3 on: October 05, 2008, 02:28:02 PM »

Alexis Weissenberg's bach partitas are so good that your 'maths' will suffer if you study while listening .

 I recommend studying maths while listening to Ludacris or Jigga instead

Either that or you get all the American Pie movies back-to-back. My idea for marathon study. It's a no-brainer, so it won't affect your brainpower. Since the music isn't as relaxing as classical, rest assured, you'll have at least 5 more waking hours.
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richard black
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« Reply #4 on: October 05, 2008, 06:07:10 PM »

Well, I dunno, I listened to Bach (and Beethoven, and Mahler, and Shostakovich and.... and....) while studying maths and that's probably why I got a lousy degree result. I recommend studying maths in silence, at least if you want to do well at maths!

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j.s. bach the 534th
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« Reply #5 on: October 05, 2008, 06:58:41 PM »

yeah, music (whether good or bad) can make it hard to study math
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alessandro
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« Reply #6 on: October 05, 2008, 08:27:42 PM »

It is hard for me to do two things at the same time.  I can't talk while making love and when I read I don't want any sound around, no music, nothing.  So if you have to study, I could not advise you, even if I was your daddy, to study with music.  But just for the sake of the topic, Bach wrote so much music, I only am familiar with a fragment of the work, the Brandenburger Concerts, I like to put them on on Sunday mornings, not too loud, are for me very enjoyable; there is a little zing of 'musak' in it, suitable as background music.  For the rest, Bach is too profound, serious, overwhelming, too good in comparison to everything else.  Another option is studying math in as much silence as possible and then having an afternoon nap with a record of the Well Tempered, eyes shut, and let the math material, while slightly being in a sleepy-dreamy state, sink down and settle in your brains.  Eventually wake up and start the whole process over again.
Anyways, good luck.
 
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richard black
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« Reply #7 on: October 05, 2008, 09:09:03 PM »

Quote
I can't talk while making love

I'm not sure that isn't more information than we needed but hey, thanks for sharing!
 Wink

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kelly_kelly
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« Reply #8 on: October 05, 2008, 09:30:08 PM »

I have really poor focus when I'm doing things I find boring (like studying math), so I need music, otherwise I'll just stare into space  Grin. For example, when I took a calculus course online, I had to have YouTube open constantly, which is why I watched about 50 videos a day. I would listen to basically anything, though.
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alessandro
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« Reply #9 on: October 05, 2008, 09:43:27 PM »

I have really poor focus when I'm doing things

There are scientist that link that quality of concentration and music, sound, business around to being socially extravert.   So, in my case, I'm more of the introvert type (I agree) and in your case you could should be (in the psychological point of view) more of an extavert.  The older version of this opposition is more gender-bound.  Man are good in focusing, chasing (Mars, Apollo, gazing at one spot etcetera) and woman are better at what one can call modernly 'multi-tasking'... 
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kelly_kelly
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« Reply #10 on: October 05, 2008, 09:59:54 PM »

There are scientist that link that quality of concentration and music, sound, business around to being socially extravert.   So, in my case, I'm more of the introvert type (I agree) and in your case you could should be (in the psychological point of view) more of an extavert.

Interesting, as I'm practically a hermit by the standards of the average 16-year-old female. But my poor focus is running away with me again. I'm currently typing this reply, listening to Bach WTC I #20, and doing my physics labs. I think I had better stop at least one of these activities  Grin.
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It all happens on Discworld, where greed and ignorance influence human behavior... and perfectly ordinary people occasionally act like raving idiots.

A world, in short, totally unlike our own.
lostinidlewonder
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« Reply #11 on: October 06, 2008, 05:38:10 AM »

They actually proved (in some university in America I don't remember) that listening to Mozart puts your brain in an Alpha state which allows you to absorb more abstract information easier. I use to listen to Mozart when I studied for exams, it did seem to help. I don't see how Bach could be much different Wink
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db05
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« Reply #12 on: October 06, 2008, 12:48:11 PM »

They actually proved (in some university in America I don't remember) that listening to Mozart puts your brain in an Alpha state which allows you to absorb more abstract information easier. I use to listen to Mozart when I studied for exams, it did seem to help. I don't see how Bach could be much different Wink


Weird because I get headaches everytime I hear Mozart. Some of my classmates hypothesized that I may be too smart for the Mozart effect. Is that even possible???
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debussy symbolism
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« Reply #13 on: October 07, 2008, 06:44:30 AM »

Weird because I get headaches everytime I hear Mozart. Some of my classmates hypothesized that I may be too smart for the Mozart effect. Is that even possible???

No, but you can be too dumb for it. Honestly, I don't know who made up the notion, but there is absolutely nothing that could make anyone smart.
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j.s. bach the 534th
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« Reply #14 on: October 07, 2008, 11:04:26 PM »

I don't see how Bach could be much different Wink


Wow, I'm not sure how to respond to this.........
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lostinidlewonder
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« Reply #15 on: October 07, 2008, 11:29:41 PM »

Wow, I'm not sure how to respond to this.........
Yeah Bach Mozart .... same stuff..... lol Smiley Not musically but in terms of brain changing effect lol.
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db05
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« Reply #16 on: October 08, 2008, 01:33:17 PM »

Honestly, I don't know who made up the notion, but there is absolutely nothing that could make anyone smart.

I thought that way, too, and concluded that the Mozart effect is a hoax.

On the other hand, studying piano and music does wonders for your brain.  Cheesy
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sauergrandson
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« Reply #17 on: October 14, 2008, 04:56:35 PM »

Well-tempered clavier.
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goldentone
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« Reply #18 on: October 16, 2008, 06:19:53 AM »

I suggest listening to Bach and immerse yourself in it before you study, instead of keeping him on in the background.  On your breaks you could put him on again and recharge.  I would go with the English Suites.  But I definitely have felt myself entering a deeper state when I've listened to the Overture No.3 Air.  Bach's orchestral works may have a more potent effect than the keyboard.
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lontano
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« Reply #19 on: March 10, 2011, 09:06:38 PM »

yeah, music (whether good or bad) can make it hard to study math
I think having something like the WTC or Goldberg or Art of Fugue playing very softly, so as not to overtake the mental work of math, yet still having a subtle influence. It would take a good bit of experimenting I'm sure, but if you're going to listen to any music while studying math I think Bach is the way to go.
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monsieurdelully
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« Reply #20 on: March 25, 2011, 10:17:11 PM »

Art of Fugue or the Musical Offering, listen to them, it works:)
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nataliethepianist
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« Reply #21 on: March 26, 2011, 03:50:15 AM »

What an interesting question! I like his Prelude and Fugues. I feel they give a sense of power and direction. I haven't tried doing my homework and listening to them (I actually think I did once), but I am sure they give motivation.

- Natalie
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