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The Women Behind Chopin’s Music

Chopin revolutionised the nature of piano music composed both technically and emotionally but the actual musical instrument that provided his greatest source of inspiration was the female voice. In this documentary marking the 200th anniversary of Chopin’s birth, pianist and trailblazer James Rhodes explores not only the Polish master’s music but also his complex relationships with women. Read more >>

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Author Topic: Post your recent music/piano investment-purchases  (Read 72517 times)
outin
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« Reply #650 on: March 19, 2016, 09:45:28 AM »

My recent piano purchases:

Now that was a bit sad Sad

I actually ordered a couple of scores the other day thanks to you...suddenly realized I own neither the Berceuse nor the Barcarolle in decent print form, even though they are my great favorites. It might take a while (like a decade) until I dare attempt either, but I can always listen to you!
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My summer projects: Scarlatti K87, K466, K109, Scriabin op74 preludes, Chopin Waltz 69-2 and Berceuse. And just exploring more music...
huaidongxi
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« Reply #651 on: April 08, 2016, 09:03:43 PM »

from a friends of the public library sale, sixty u.s. cents per score.  the dust on some of these was a hundred years old, possibly older.  please comment if you have any familiarity with the works named, as I have virtually none, the Bartok excepted.  thanks again to all who take the time to read and respond.

Gottschalk (pub. Oliver Ditson), "the Dying Poet", (pub. National Music) "the Last Hope" ; Scarlatti-Tausig "Pastorale" sonata G major ; Leschetizky (ded. a la Reine Elisabeth de Roumanie) "Barcarola" op.39 no.1 ; Bartok (edito musica Budapest) "First Term at the Piano" ; R.Strauss (Universal Ed.) "Traum durch di Daemmerung" op.29 no.1 ;'theorisch-praktische Klavier-Schule' von Hugo Riemann, op.39 vol.5, bilingual, Exercises in the use of the Pedal ; piano arr. by Gordon Jacob of Bach, "Jesu, joy of man's desiring" (Oxford Univ.Press) ; and four old Schirmer's editions, Clementi, 'Gradus ad Parnassum' (edit. Carl Tausig) ; Koehler 'Practical Method for the Pianoforte' Book One (edit. Scharfenberg, Oesterle) ; Czerny 'Thirty New Studies in Technics Op. 849' (Buonamici) ; Czerny Legato and Staccato Fifty Studies op.335 (Buonamici).



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briansaddleback
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« Reply #652 on: April 08, 2016, 09:08:10 PM »

Pictures at an Exhibition Mussorgsky sheet music $7 , there's this Keyboard Concepts piano store nearby and on occasion I go there to check out all the pianos about an hour I look around and tinker around , so I always buy a cheap sheet music before I do that so I feel like I am patronizing the business rather than just look like Im loitering.
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Work in progress:

Rondo Alla Turca
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« Reply #653 on: April 10, 2016, 07:44:46 AM »

Beethoven concerti 3 and 4, as well as the second Chopin about 2 months ago.
Other than that, Finale 2014 was a great purchase about a year ago too.
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« Reply #654 on: April 18, 2016, 12:43:53 PM »

struck rare music gold. got a clean/new old stock vintage spiral bound book of the complete music/score-transcriptions of Duke Ellington's complete Sacred Jazz concerts. Big scanning project in the works for me but it's an almost irreplaceable score , so if something happened to my hard copy, i need a clean PDF of it as back up due to how impossible it is to find these scores/books on the used book scene.

FYI about the music. *pretty stoked to start learning/reading through these
AllMusic Review by Richard S. Ginell  [-]
Though Duke Ellington called his first concert of sacred music "the most important thing I've ever done," it might have been more accurately called the most controversial thing he had ever done -- even more so than the so-called "Controversial Suite." The year was 1965; institutions of all kinds, including organized religion, were under fire; even Time magazine dared to run a cover with the legend "Is God Dead?" In response to progressive members of the clergy, jazz musicians like Ellington, Lalo Schifrin, Vince Guaraldi, and a bit later, Dave Brubeck took up the challenge of fusing Christian texts with jazz -- and no project had a higher profile, nor drew more fire, than Ellington's. Conservatives called it a blasphemous attempt to sully religion with jazz; radicals thought it was a sellout on bended knee to organized religion. Yet this first concert, the best of the three that Ellington was to organize in the last nine years of his life, holds up stunningly well today. It's actually a patchwork of this and that from several stages of Ellington's career, going all the way back to "Come Sunday" from "Black, Brown and Beige" (which is heard twice in vocal and instrumental versions) and including material from the 1963 show My People. More than that, the concert taps into Ellington's roots in showbiz and African-American culture as well as his evidently deep religious faith, throwing it all together in the spirit of universality and sealing everything with the stamps of his musical signatures. Ellington's attempt to grab his audience directly by the scruffs of their necks is apparent immediately in "In the Beginning God," where the commanding bass-baritone of Brock Peters describes a primordial universe without modern trappings: "No poverty, no Cadillacs, no sandtraps, no mudpacks...no bottom, no topless...no birds, no bees, no Beatles...." There's even a snazzy number for jazz band, chorus, and tap dancer (Bunny Briggs), "David Danced Before the Lord With All His Might," where "Come Sunday"'s tune appears for the third time. Gospel singer Esther Marrow swings as hard as the band on "Tell Me It's the Truth" and a setting of "The Lord's Prayer" -- and gives "Come Sunday" one of its most soulful treatments on record. The Ellington band still had many of its legendary soloists on hand to testify, including Johnny Hodges, Paul Gonsalves, Harry Carney, Cootie Williams, and returning from the '50s band, Louie Bellson driving hard on the drums. But none of the ingredients would matter in the end if the material wasn't as strong as it is, recorded live in New York's Fifth Avenue Presbyterian Church.


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indianajo
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« Reply #655 on: April 18, 2016, 03:37:49 PM »

Congratulations Visitor on the Ellington scores.  
I never even heard of this concert.  I have great sympathy for the controversy of sacred jazz. I've been banned from soloing or originating any piece at my church.  Probably because I play too many notes, and worse, the deadly dotted quarter - eighth syncopated ones.  Keith Green or George Winston anybody? Certainly not!
So there is hope of a "new song" with notes faster than whole notes, in heaven? Halleluja!
I missed the Duke here on earth. When I was making $8 an hour he never came south of Dallas.  Pity. I did get to hear Count Basie at the Houston Collisseum about 1975, a high point.  
To stay on topic, my most recent purchase was a $140 KSM27 Shure microphone, to make the second of a set. I looked for mikes this good I could afford for 46 years.   I might record one of these days, after my rotator cuff tendon heals back. I will be 6 weeks immobilized in a sling the CMA tells me.  So I guess I'm buying my arm back Tomorrow. 
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visitor
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« Reply #656 on: April 18, 2016, 04:37:06 PM »

Congratulations Visitor on the Ellington scores.  
I never even heard of this concert.  I have great sympathy for the controversy of sacred jazz. I've been banned from soloing or originating any piece at my church.  Probably because I play too many notes, and worse, the deadly dotted quarter - eighth syncopated ones.  Keith Green or George Winston anybody? Certainly not!
So there is hope of a "new song" with notes faster than whole notes, in heaven? Halleluja!
I missed the Duke here on earth. When I was making $8 an hour he never came south of Dallas.  Pity. I did get to hear Count Basie at the Houston Collisseum about 1975, a high point.  
To stay on topic, my most recent purchase was a $140 KSM27 Shure microphone, to make the second of a set. I looked for mikes this good I could afford for 46 years.   I might record one of these days, after my rotator cuff tendon heals back. I will be 6 weeks immobilized in a sling the CMA tells me.  So I guess I'm buying my arm back Tomorrow. 

thanks. will hope to post impressions on the scores as i read them and scan/archive .
i don't understand why everything has to a controversy.

as for the concerts, my book shows there were 3, here is an original of one of them


yeah, i feel you on never being at the right place/right time to hear/experience something you think might be/might have been great . sorry to hear about your injury. be conservative, slow healing leads to fast recovery, don't over do it, re injury is not fun Cool Cool
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visitor
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« Reply #657 on: June 06, 2016, 03:55:15 AM »

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outin
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« Reply #658 on: June 06, 2016, 05:43:15 AM »



I really love this one! If I had been given such pieces as a child, maybe I wouldn't have been so eager to quit the piano Smiley

I just got these:
Miaskovsky "Song and Rhapsody


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« Reply #659 on: June 06, 2016, 10:20:39 AM »

I really love this one! If I had been given such pieces as a child, maybe I wouldn't have been so eager to quit the piano Smiley

I just got these:
Miaskovsky "Song and Rhapsody



i have such a long list of things to get haha Cheesy
..lol. i have a soft spot for music for children, but not the watered down  stuff in progressive courses" but the through composed works by serious talented composers....i had the Casella on a wish list for a while but had slowed my aquisition of them for some time, so catching up.
 lovely little things cannot wait to sit down and read them.

coincidentally i just posted some recordings of miakovsky the other day on one of the scriabin threads! call me super jelly, i do not have any hard copy miakovsky Cry
where did you find that?, your proximity to russia and firmer soviet states  can give you access to some phenomenally rare music. good job outin!!!!!


picked up the Diamond Sonata 1, had scanned a long time ago but qated a hard copy and its out of print i believe so when a new old stock one turned up, i jumped on
it. it is compared some to the beethoven op 110, here is a review of it from the recording review

CD Review
The Rosalyn Tureck Collection

Volume 3, Première Performances
David Diamond: Piano Sonata #1
Luigi Dallapiccola: Two Studies for Violin & Piano *
William Schuman: Piano Concerto (revised 1942)
Rosalyn Tureck, piano
* Ruggiero Ricci, violin
Saidenberg Little Symphony Orchestra/Daniel Saidenberg
VAI VAIA1124 62:26


Summary for the Busy Executive: That girl can play.

These days, we tend to think of Tureck as a Bach specialist, and I suspect at least some of us mistrust this exclusivity. After all, Bach doesn't provide the Romantic keyboard pyrotechnique of a Liszt or a Rachmaninoff, and there was indeed a relatively prominent Mozartean who simply hadn't the fingers to perform anyone else. We forget that at the outset of her career, Tureck played everything – Beethoven, Chopin, the operatic paraphrases of people like Godowsky – the stuff of the young virtuoso in the Thirties and Forties. She also played her share of then-contemporary music. Typical of Tureck, contemporary music was not simply the way to get noticed, before one then had the career security to settle into a lifetime of "safe" programming. She strongly believed in performers and composers talking to each other and founded at least one concert series devoted to contemporary music. Besides, Tureck didn't need to get noticed. People noticed her. Diamond composed the magnificent piano sonata heard on this CD uncommissioned and unasked, simply because Tureck's playing inspired him. As William F. Buckley remarked, the only thing wrong with Tureck's dedication to Bach was that it deprived us of her Brahms and Chopin. Now VAI Audio has released at least three CDs documenting Tureck's earlier career, and we can hear for ourselves what the clamor was about.

The best work on the CD – for me, the Diamond – belongs to that somewhat obscure category, the American Piano Sonata. With the exceptions of the Ives Second, the Griffes, the Barber, and the Carter, I can't think off the top of my head of anything approaching the status of repertory classic. The Diamond and the Talma Second would, in a better world, be better known. Both set out for the monumental and pretty much hit what they aim at. Diamond has acknowledged the influence of the late Beethoven sonatas, and one can easily see the resemblances to the Op. 110, with Diamond's conflation of two movements in one and extended fugue. Diamond gives us, in fact, two fugues, one as the peroration of the first movement and the second (a double fugue) a summing up of the entire sonata. The composer had counted Tureck's Bach recitals among his best concert experiences, and when he began the sonata with Tureck in mind, the one thing he knew for sure was that there would be a fugue. The entire sonata alternates between the declamatory and the contrapuntal. Tureck plays the bejabbers out of it – a huge tone that "calls the meeting to order" and a panoply of "touch." As with her Bach playing, you have the feeling that she can emphasize any line she wishes and that she has decided to bring out the structurally most important ones. The recording makes it clear that Tureck has absorbed the work into her bones; it is assured, free, and powerful. Tureck's performance lets a première sound like an instant classic – an account at a level most composers would sell their souls for. Diamond must have been thrilled.


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outin
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« Reply #660 on: June 06, 2016, 11:51:30 AM »

i have such a long list of things to get haha Cheesy
..lol. i have a soft spot for music for children, but not the watered down  stuff in progressive courses" but the through composed works by serious talented composers....i had the Casella on a wish list for a while but had slowed my aquisition of them for some time, so catching up.
 lovely little things cannot wait to sit down and read them.

coincidentally i just posted some recordings of miakovsky the other day on one of the scriabin threads! call me super jelly, i do not have any hard copy miakovsky Cry
where did you find that?, your proximity to russia and firmer soviet states  can give you access to some phenomenally rare music. good job outin!!!!!


I was killing time in Helsinki after piano shopping so I went to the Ruslania book store. Just picked a couple of scores that looked interesting. Usually I just order things through their website. Not all are good enough print for my eyes though.

I then listened to the M piece in yt and it's actually really nice!
I have this bad habit of collecting scores that I cannot play  Grin
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visitor
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« Reply #661 on: June 06, 2016, 12:03:57 PM »

I was killing time in Helsinki after piano shopping so I went to the Ruslania book store. Just picked a couple of scores that looked interesting. Usually I just order things through their website. Not all are good enough print for my eyes though.

I then listened to the M piece in yt and it's actually really nice!
I have this bad habit of collecting scores that I cannot play  Grin
i see. yeah the rulania site is pretty much one of the only reliable places to source some of the soviet print stuff.

i too collect far more than i have time or currently capable to play, it's alright though, always hope for the future!

I hope the Casella pieces grow on me, i would like to play through the lot along w several other collections of children's works (I will work to a lot of Yuyama stuff later this year). Right now my time is dedicated to some odds and ends = jazz rearrangements of a few standards which i will be doing for a long time/foreseeable future.

I also just started on a suite of neo impressionistic pieces by concert pianist (and very humble composer- so humble in both regard for his own playing and composing skill that he remains virtually unknown) Michel Block. His french suite is really pretty incredible i cannot wait to record it and share  Smiley


btw do take a listen to Michel Block's Scriabin sonata no 2, i will post in the scriabin thread. although I love certain players in general for specific composers there are exceptions and Block's rendition of the no2 is i feel one of the finest and most underrated recorded.


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chopinlover01
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« Reply #662 on: June 07, 2016, 01:48:28 AM »

I have this bad habit of collecting scores that I cannot play  Grin
I'll take any you don't want! Wink
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outin
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« Reply #663 on: June 07, 2016, 06:12:58 AM »

I'll take any you don't want! Wink

I'm keeping them for my retirement. Maybe I'll be capable enough by then Smiley
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My summer projects: Scarlatti K87, K466, K109, Scriabin op74 preludes, Chopin Waltz 69-2 and Berceuse. And just exploring more music...
chopinlover01
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« Reply #664 on: June 07, 2016, 11:03:55 PM »

I'm keeping them for my retirement. Maybe I'll be capable enough by then Smiley
Damn Scandinavians, being able to retire before 93...
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« Reply #665 on: June 08, 2016, 05:00:38 AM »

Damn Scandinavians, being able to retire before 93...
Still not a Scandinavian  Roll Eyes
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My summer projects: Scarlatti K87, K466, K109, Scriabin op74 preludes, Chopin Waltz 69-2 and Berceuse. And just exploring more music...
visitor
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« Reply #666 on: June 08, 2016, 10:55:45 PM »


basically got the book just for this piece. cannot get it out of my head.

this kid's playing blows my mind. also that the composer was only 18 when he wrote that prelude..  pretty wild
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chopinlover01
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« Reply #667 on: June 09, 2016, 05:10:39 PM »

Still not a Scandinavian  Roll Eyes
Isn't Finland counted as part of Scandanavia? At least the general region.
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« Reply #668 on: June 10, 2016, 06:27:45 AM »

Isn't Finland counted as part of Scandanavia? At least the general region.
No, it shouldn't be.
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outin
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« Reply #669 on: June 13, 2016, 04:34:59 PM »

Today I found a bunch of older piano sheet music in a second hand book store for just a few euros. Some are German or French publications, but half are Soviet era Russian and some have only cyrillic letters that I need to study more in depth before I can tell all the composers Smiley

Among them there's a children's album by G.Sviridov (17 pieces), sonatinen by Beethoven, Mozart sonata k570, 2 russian albums with 4-hand pieces by several composers some of which I am yet to figure out, Gounod's piano arrangement of Bach C major prelude,  couple of waltzes by Strauss, op 367, 410, Ravel 5 4-hand pieces for children, Saint-saens Carnival des Animaux, Grieg's Norwegian Dances op 35, C.M.vWeber op 65, and a rather mysterious album that looks playable, but completely in Russian and none of the composers names look familiar...

EDIT: After a short self-study in Russian I translated the last book as "Popular film music arranged for piano". Mostly composers I've never heard of but could find references to some of them:
I.Dunajewskij, A.Pahmutova, T.Hrennikov, A.Babayev (found his wonderful trio in Youtube...still have quite a few names to transliterate...but I'd rather listen to this piece now)
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« Reply #670 on: July 21, 2016, 07:44:36 PM »

finally found a rare edition with new/modern typset (and non cyrilic) of a couple Kossenko etudes I'm working on as well as a Korchmareff (Kortchmaryov)  piece that I haven't seen anywhere. pretty stoked.
 Cool
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« Reply #671 on: July 21, 2016, 09:10:23 PM »

I just bought Bach's Toccata and Fugue in D minor arranged by Cory Hall. It's far easier than Busoni's yet reasonably faithful to the original. Nicely fingered, and he also has a tutorial for the Toccata on YT. It will be a while before I can manage the Fugue, anyway!
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chopinlover01
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« Reply #672 on: July 21, 2016, 11:18:35 PM »

Doesn't Paul Barton also have an arrangement of that? I'd rather buy scores from someone who isn't a deluded narcissist.

In actual purchases, I bought a volume of Respighi. Pictures (and hopefully recordings!) to come.
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« Reply #673 on: July 21, 2016, 11:43:35 PM »

Doesn't Paul Barton also have an arrangement of that? I'd rather buy scores from someone who isn't a deluded narcissist.

In actual purchases, I bought a volume of Respighi. Pictures (and hopefully recordings!) to come.

Haha, well he might, but I went to college with Cory--didn't seem like that way back then, and since I know him, I thought I'd support him.
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« Reply #674 on: August 09, 2016, 02:12:16 PM »

lessons   Smiley
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« Reply #675 on: June 16, 2017, 12:33:45 AM »

Just pulled the trigger on this.
Final Fantasy Piano XV Collections
Score sheets/sheet music book. Just released and am excited to get in there and play around and learn them


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« Reply #676 on: June 20, 2017, 02:24:48 AM »

Granblue Fantasy Piano Collections

Nabbed up some new fare by Nobuo  Uematsu, got the sheet music book and grabbed the audio album to it as well. Playing is good as I believe Duke of Pianeet is featured on the cd (his Alkan recordings are awesome so he makes quick work of these tracks)
Yamaha  does fantasic work on the print playing and binding quality of thes books

 


There are better tracks and transcriptions but this in is still kinda nice
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« Reply #677 on: June 24, 2017, 08:55:39 PM »

A La Francaise by Remi Bouchard
Moonlight in Vermont  solo transcription
R Vaughn Williams solo transcription of Linden Lea (lovely arr by Harold Perry)
Moments in a Child's World by Richard Faith.
Solo transcription of that awesome Tango by Jacob  Gade, Jalousie, arr by Henry Levine
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« Reply #678 on: June 25, 2017, 11:14:40 AM »

lessons   Smiley

me too. signed up for lessons at a conservatory last week. quite nervous though, as i may have acquired bad habits (my previous teachers didn't seem to observe how i played..)
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« Reply #679 on: June 25, 2017, 12:01:40 PM »

me too. signed up for lessons at a conservatory last week. quite nervous though, as i may have acquired bad habits (my previous teachers didn't seem to observe how i played..)
dont be nervous, your teacher.is not there.to judge or out to get you but help you improve. Congrats on making it a priority and worijng to get better
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